Tag Archives: presidio hill san diego

San Diego Historical Landmarks—#4: Presidio of San Diego site, part 1

San Diego Historical Landmarks

San Diego Historical Landmark #4 is the site of the Presidio of San Diego.

Presidio of San Diego site

San Diego Presidio Site
Soldiers, sailors, Indians, and Franciscan missionaries from New Spain occupied the land at Presidio Hill on May 17, 1769 as a military outpost. Two months later, Fr. Junipero Serra established the first San Diego mission on Presidio Hill. Officially proclaimed a Spanish Presidio on January 1, 1774, the fortress was later occupied by a succession of Mexican forces. The Presidio was abandoned in 1837 after San Diego became a pueblo.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Only ruins of the Presidio remain, simple bumps in the ground:

Site of the Presidio of San Diego

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

A walk around the surround grounds finds many items of interest, such as a statue of “The Indian” by Arthur Putnam (1873-1930)….

The Indian, by Arthur Puinam, in San Diego California

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

….a statue of “The Padre,” also by Arthur Putnam….

"The Padre" by Arthur Putnam in San Diego California

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

….and a hugemonstergiganticreallyreallybig cross made out of bricks:

The Cross in Presidio Park in San Diego California

The Cross in Presidio Park in San Diego California

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Wouldn’t it be neat if we discovered that the bricks are from an old building in the area? Sadly, I could find nothing about the cross other than what is told on a plaque at the base:

In this ancient Indian village of Cosoy
Discovered and named San Miguel by Cabrillo in 1549
Visited and christened San Diego de Alcala by Vizcaino in 1602
Here the first citizen
Fray Junipero Serra
Planted civilization in California
Here he first raised the cross. Here began the first mission.
Here founded the first town, San Diego, July 16, 1769
In memory of him and his works. The Order of Panama 1913.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Just across the street from the ruins of the Presidio is the Junípero Serra Museum, one of the most familiar landmarks in San Diego.

Junipero Serra Museum in San Diego California

Junipero Serra Museum in San Diego California

Junipero Serra Museum in San Diego California

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

The Junípero Serra Museum is often mistaken for Mission Basilica San Diego de Alcalá—indeed, for many years, I counted myself among the mistaken.

The Serra Museum was built in 1928-1929 for the purpose of housing the collection of the San Diego Historical Society (now named the San Diego History Center), which was founded in 1928. William Templeton Johnson was the architect and used Spanish Revival architecture to resemble the early missions that once dominated the Southern California landscape.

Following are three pictures from the Museum’s collection of the Museum in 1929:

Architect’s elevation drawingElevation of the Junipero Serra Museum in San Diego California

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Project completedJunipero Serra Museum in San Diego California

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Dedication DayDedication day of the Junipero Serra Museum in San Diego California

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Prior to the Great Recession, the Museum was open seven days a week. Now, sadly, it is open only on weekends.

There are other markers from the past, and I’m sure I missed some because they are located in strange places, places which probably weren’t so strange many decades ago. An example is this tree, possibly as old as the ruins:

Presidio Hill in San Diego California

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

See the crooked gravestone-like marker at the right of the trunk? Obviously I had to go see what it said:

Presidio Hill in San Diego California

Dedicated in memory of
Father Francisco Palou
Biographer of Fr. Serra

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

I also discovered a huge statue of a man on a horse:

Presidio Hill in San Diego California

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

The plaque on the base is in Spanish:

DONADO A LA CIUDAD DE SAN DIEGO
POR EL SEÑOR LICENSIADO
GUSTAVO DIAZ ORDAZ
PRESIDENTE DE LA REPUBLICA MEXICANA
NOVIEMBRE DE 1970

Wikipedia tells me that Gustavo Diaz Ordaz (1911-1979) was president of Mexico from 1964 to 1970. That, however, doesn’t explain anything about this statue and why it is there. Research for another day….

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

As I said earlier, the Junípero Serra Museum is open only on Saturdays and Sundays. I went a couple of weeks ago, and in my next posting about San Diego Historical Landmarks, I’ll take you inside the Museum. It’s quite beautiful and should not be missed if you make a trip to Presidio Hill.

The San Diego Presidio Site is also California Registered Historic Landmark #59. Considering that this is where California was founded, what 58 sites could be more important?

Junipero Sera Museum in San Diego California

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

For the introductory blog post
to San Diego’s historical landmarks,
click on San Diego’s Historical Landmarks.

For previous posts in the
San Diego Historical Landmarks series,
go here.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

Need a unique gift? Have Bare Wall Symdrome?
Visit Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos at Fine Art America.
photograhic art taking pictures making art

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San Diego Historical Landmarks—#3: Fort Stockton

San Diego Historical Landmarks

San Diego Historical Landmark #3 is the site of Fort Stockton. From afar, all you see is a flag:

Site of Fort Stockton in San Diego, California, marked by a flag

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Fort Stockton was originally named Fort DuPont and is located on Presidio Hill. It has expansive views of Mission Valley, Old Town San Diego, the San Diego Harbor, and the Pacific Ocean, accounting for its strategic importance during the Mexican-American War of 1846-1848.

View from Presidio Hill

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

View from Presidio Hill

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

The square doohickey in the picture immediately above is the carriage for an old cannon. The cannon is on display in the Serra Museum a few hundred yards away. It was cast in 1783, bears the coat of arms of King Carlos III of Spain, the name “El Jupiter,” and a Latin phrase which translates as “Beware the King’s Thunderbolts.” I will endeavor to get a picture of the cannon this weekend.

Presidio Hill is where the first European settlement in Alta California was established in 1769. The Spanish occupied Presidio Hill until Mexico gained its independence in 1821. By the time war broke out between Mexico and the U.S. in 1846, Presidio Hill had been abandoned.

At the beginning of the Mexican-American War, in July of 1846, U.S. forces numbering 160 from the USS Cayne took San Diego and re-established a military outpost on Presidio Hill, naming it Fort DuPont after the Cayne’s captain, Samuel F. DuPont.

Ten days after capturing San Diego, DuPont and the majority of his men sailed the Cayne north to successfully take Los Angeles, leaving behind just forty men in San Diego. A Mexican offensive which began in Los Angeles in September 1846 made its way south to San Diego. By October, San Diego once again belonged to the Mexicans. Three weeks later, though, the Americans recaptured San Diego for the second time.

Old Fort Stockton in San DiegoIn November 1846, Commodore Robert Stockton, commander of the American Pacific Squadron, sailed the USS Congress into San Diego Bay. His troops took over Fort DuPont, renamed it Fort Stockton, and strengthened its defenses. Fort Stockton changed hands several times between American troops and Mexican troops during the war. When the war ended in 1848, Fort Stockton was abandoned.

Plaques, monuments, and the flag mark the spot where Fort Stockton once stood. All evidence of its existence, however, has faded into history.

Several of the plaques and monuments remind us that the famed Mormon Battalion arrived at Fort Stockton in on January 29, 1847. Originally consisting of 500 men and about 80 women and children, they had left Council Bluffs, Iowa on July 16, 1846, a grueling 2,000-mile march to San Diego. They had come as their patriotic duty to help in the war effort. But the war in California was over by the time of their arrival. Nonetheless, their patriotism and march are unparalleled in the annals of history.

Mormon Battalion plaque at Fort Stockton in San Diego

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Mormon Battalion plaque at Fort Stockton in San Diego

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Mormon Battalion plaque at Fort Stockton in San Diego

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Monument to the Mormon Battalion at Fort Stockton in San Diego

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Monument to the Mormon Battalion at Fort Stockton in San Diego

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Monument to the Mormon Battalion at Fort Stockton in San Diego

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Mormon Battalion plaque at Fort Stockton in San Diego

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Mormon Battalion plaque at Fort Stockton in San Diego

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Fort Stockton is San Diego Historical Landmark #3 and California Registered Historic Landmark #54.

Fort Stockton in San Diego

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Old Glory at Fort Stockton historical site in San Diego

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

For the introductory blog post
to San Diego’s historical landmarks,
click on San Diego’s Historical Landmarks.

For previous posts in the
San Diego Historical Landmarks series,
go here.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

This post approved by
This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

Need a unique gift? Have Bare Wall Symdrome?
Visit Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos at Fine Art America.
photograhic art taking pictures making art