Tag Archives: massachusetts

Music on Mondays (11-6-17)—Lost on a desert island, 1967

The Music Chronicles of Russel Ray

My Lost On A Desert Island music collection would have 28 songs from 1967 on it, 12 by The Beatles. Sadly, original Beatles songs are not available as videos on YouTube. Seems to me like someone is losing a lot of money since YouTube pays royalties when one watches a video.

I tried making private Beatles videos but it takes a while to make them and even longer to upload them to YouTube, so I’m giving up on that venture. In future Music on Mondays posts, I’ll just list the songs by The Beatles and you’ll have to search them out on your own. Here are the 12 from 1967:

  1. All You Need Is Love—Peaked at #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart.
  2. Eleanor Rigby—The B side of the Yellow Submarine single yet still made it up to #11 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart.
  3. Good Day Sunshine—Released as the B side to the Jukebox only single Here, There, And Everywhere.
  4. Got To Get You Into My Life—Not released as a single until 1976, 10 years after being released on the Revolver album and six years after The Beatles broke up. Made it up to #7 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1976.
  5. Hello, Goodbye—Peaked at #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart
  6. Here, There, and Everywhere—Released as a Jukebox only single in 1996.
  7. I Am The Walrus—Released as the B side of the Hello, Goodbye single.
  8. Penny Lane—Released with Strawberry Fields Forever as a double A-side single. Peaked at #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart.
  9. Strawberry Fields Forever—Released with Penny Lane as a double A-side single. Peaked at #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart.
  10. The Fool On The Hill—Released as the B side of the Jukebox only single Magical Mystery Tour in 1996.
  11. Yellow Submarine—Peaked at #2 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart.
  12. Your Mother Should Know—From the Magical Mystery Tour album. Not released as a single.

Following are the other 16 songs from 1967 that I would take with me if there were a possibility of being lost on a desert island.

Bottle Of Wine by The Fireballs
#9 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

Daydream Believer by The Monkees
#1 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

Get Together by The Youngbloods
#62 hit on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1967
by hit #5 when re-released in 1969

Harry Rag by The Kinks
From the album Something Else

Let’s Go To San Francisco by The Flowerpot Men
Did not chart in the United States but made it to #1 in Britain

Massachusetts by The Bee Gees
#11 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

San Francisco (Be Sure To Wear Flowers In Your Hair) by Scott McKenzie
#4 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

She’s A Rainbow by The Rolling Stones
#25 hit on the Billboard Hot 100
Quite possibly my favorite song by the Stones

Somebody To Love by Jefferson Airplane
#5 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

The 59th Street Bridge Song (Feelin’ Groovy) by Harpers Bizarre
#13 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

Tuesday Afternoon by The Moody Blues
#24 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

The Beat Goes On by Sonny & Cher
#6 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

Nights In White Satin by The Moody Blues
#103 on the Billboard Hot 100 “Bubbling Under” chart
but made it to #2 upon its re-release in 1972

Windy by The Association
#1 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

White Rabbit by Jefferson Airplane
My favorite by Jefferson Airplane.
I could listen to Grace Slick sing all day long.
#8 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

Who Will Answer? by Ed Ames
#19 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

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The Geisel Library at the University of California San Diego

Today happens to be the birthday of Theodor Seuss Geisel, more famously known simply as Dr. Seuss. In honor of Dr. Seuss, today is also National Read Across America Day, a reading initiative created by the National Education Association. Although Geisel was born in Springfield, Massachusetts in 1904, he died right here in La Jolla in 1991.

La Jolla, California

All pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Geisel and his wife, Helen, moved to La Jolla shortly after World War II, and it was from La Jolla that he wrote his most popular works:

  • If I Ran the Zoo (1950)
  • Horton Hears a Who! (1955)
  • If I Ran the Circus (1956)
  • The Cat in the Hat (1957)
  • How the Grinch Stole Christmas (1957)
  • Green Eggs and Ham (1960)
  • One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish (1960)

Sadly, Geisel’s first wife, Helen, committed suicide on October 23, 1967, over her husband’s affair with Audrey Stone Dimond, whom he married on June 21, 1968. Geisel had no children with either of his two wives, but he and Audrey spent almost a quarter of a century contributing to literacy nationwide, as well as the programs of the library at the University of California San Diego.

Geisel died of throat cancer on September 24, 1991, and on December 1, 1995, the University of California San Diego renamed the University Library Building to the Geisel Library in honor of Audrey and Theodor Seuss Geisel. It ranks as one of the most unique buildings in San Diego. Here are some pictures that I took on March 2, 2011:

Geisel Library at the University of California San Diego

Geisel Library at the University of California San Diego

Geisel Library at the University of California San Diego

All pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

The library has thirteen floors of which only 12 are usable. Eight floors are in the skyscraper, two are underground, and there is no third floor if you’re in the elevator. The third floor is simply an emergency exit that allows people in the skyscraper to evacuate without having to go down through the subterranean floors.

Since it is a skyscraper, one would not think to go down in order to go up:

Geisel Library at the University of California San Diego

All pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Parts of the library are actually underground. I didn’t realize it until I was leaving the library, but this part that I was walking on is the roof of part of the library:

Geisel Library at the University of California San Diego

All pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

The crooked wall you see at the right in the picture above looks like this:

Geisel Library at the University of California San Diego

Geisel Library at the University of California San Diego

All pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Interestingly, there was a Dr. Hans Seuss who also lived in La Jolla at the same time. Dr. Hans Seuss was an internationally renowned chemist and nuclear physicist, and a founding faculty member of the University of California San Diego in 1958. The United States Postal Service confused Dr. Hans Seuss and Theodor Seuss Geisel, regularly delivering to Dr. Hans Seuss mail that was addressed to Geisel’s Dr. Seuss.

The Dr. Seuss Collection, housed in the Geisel Library, is the world’s largest repository of Geisel’s original drawings, sketches, and manuscripts. Dr. Hans Seuss’s private collection is also housed in the Geisel Library, forever linking the two Seusses.

Geisel Library at the University of California San Diego

This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat