Tag Archives: let it be

Music on Mondays (11-27-17)—Lost on a desert island, 1970, part 1

The Music Chronicles of Russel Ray

My Lost On A Desert Island music collection would have 53 songs from 1970 on it, 8 by The Beatles, all from Let It Be. I’m pretty sure Let It Be ranks as my #2 Beatles album behind Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. Original Beatles songs are not available as videos on YouTube so I cannot provide any links to such videos. I leave it to you to search out Beatles videos or simply put on your own music and start singing! Here are the 8 from 1970:

  1. Two Of Us
  2. Across The Universe
  3. Let It Be
  4. I’ve Got A Feeling
  5. One After 909
  6. The Long & Winding Road
  7. For You Blue
  8. Get Back

Following are the next 23 songs from 1970 that I would take with me if there were a possibility of being lost on a desert island. With the breakup of The Beatles, this was the year that I started exploring darker, heavier music, much to the chagrin of my wise old grandmother. She understood Let It Be and The Long & Winding Road. Not so much Deep Purple and Black Sabbath.

25 Or 6 To 4 by Chicago
#4 hit on the Billboard Hot 100
Chicago’s first song to reach the Top 5

Bridge Over Troubled Water by Simon & Garfunkel
#1 hit on the Billboard Hot 100
Won the 1971 Grammy for “Record of the Year” and “Song of the Year”

Cecilia by Simon & Garfunkel
#4 hit on the Billboard Hot 100
I always wanted to date a Cecilia so I could sing this to her.

Colour My World by Chicago
Released twice, both times as the B side to other singles
Make Me Smile in 1970 and Beginnings in 1971
The first non-classical song that I learned on the piano.
video

Easy Come, Easy Go by Bobby Sherman
#9 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

El Condor Pasa (If I Could) by Simon & Garfunkel
#18 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

Ma Belle Amie by The Tee Set
#5 hit on the Billboard Hot 100
Until I went to YouTube for this blog post,
I had no idea that this was a “Gay Tune.”
Should I turn in my Gay Card?

The Boxer by Simon & Garfunkel
#7 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

Spirit In The Sky by Norman Greenbaum
#3 hit on the Billboard Hot 100
Forty years later I won a music trivia contest by being able
to name this song after just 3 notes.

Love Grows (Where My Rosemary Goes) by Edison Lighthouse
#5 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

Come & Get It by Badfinger
#7 hit on the Billboard Hot 100
Written by Paul McCartney.

Shilo by Neil Diamond
#24 hit on the Billboard Hot 100
My aunt in Los Angeles introduced me to Neil Diamond in 1968.

Hitchin’ A Ride by Vanity Fare
#5 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

Add Some Music To Your Day by The Beach Boys
#64 hit on the Billboard Hot 100
One of my favorite songs about music.

Go Back by Crabby Appleton
#36 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

Ride Captain Ride by Blues Image
#4 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

Gimme Dat Ding by The Pipkins
#9 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

Black Knight by Deep Purple
#66 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

Evil Woman by Black Sabbath
#19 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

Wicked World by Black Sabbath
From their eponymous debut album

Lookin’ Out My Back Door by Creedence Clearwater Revival
#2 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

Who’ll Stop The Rain? by Creedence Clearwater Revival
#2 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

I Heard It Through The Grapevine by Creedence Clearwater Revival
#43  hit on the Billboard Hot 100
The single was 3:50; it’s this 11:11 album version that really turns me on.

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Music on Mondays (10-9-17)—Cathy’s Clown is Downtown at the House of the Rising Sun

The Music Chronicles of Russel Ray

My favorite songs list is coming along nicely. I think this list also might tell me what my favorite albums are. For example, four songs off of “Bridge Over Troubled Water” by Simon & Garfunkel made the last. However, eight songs off of “Let It Be” by The Beatles made the list. I like both albums but after listening to them one right after the other, yeah, I like “Let It Be” more. It doesn’t hurt, of course, that I already know that The Beatles are my top group of all time….

One of my commenters last week said that he detected a theme, something about death and war. Hmmmm. It was the 1950s with an undeclared war called the “Korean Conflict,” as opposed to World War I, World War II, Civil War, Revolutionary War, Vietnam War, War of 1812. But out of the five songs last week, only two had anything to do with war. Nonetheless, considering that the United States and its immediate predecessor, thirteen colonies, have been in existence for 241 years and at war for 224 of those 241 years, it shouldn’t be any surprise that there are some good war songs and anti-war songs.

Today’s post will be the last time that I group several years together, 1960-1964. My music collecting started in 1965, and my favorites list definitely shows that. So without further ado, let’s start 1960-1964 with, uh, two war songs:

“Ballad of the Alamo” by Marty Robbins, 1960—My youngest uncle who introduced me to Gogi Grant on last week’s list also introduced me to Marty Robbins via his “More Greatest Hits” album of 1961. I can tell you that Marty definitely is my favorite country singer.

“Sink The Bismarck” by Johnny Horton, 1960—Johnny made last week’s list with “The Battle Of New Orleans.” I might have to see if there is something in Johnny’s background that made him sing about specific incidents in war or if he just had a general interest like me.

“Cathy’s Clown” by The Everly Brothers, 1960—The Everly Brothers will have quite a few songs on my favorites list. This probably is my favorite of theirs. I have been singing this since I first heard it many decades ago.

“Downtown” by Petula Clark, 1964—We didn’t have country music in northern Utah where I lived from 1961-1965 so I didn’t hear this song, or anything by Petula, until I went to live with my wise old grandmother in deep South Texas in December 1965. Another one from my youngest uncle.

“House Of The Rising Sun” by The Animals, 1964—I first heard this song on KLOL FM out of Corpus Christ, Texas, in March 1973. Some friends and I were driving from Kingsville to Alice to buy booze for our senior prom. The drinking age was 18 but Kingsville and Kleberg Country were dry, so it was a 20-mile drive to get real booze. I was 18, so I had the privilege of buying a lot of booze for friends. The rights of passage and the price of admission to the In Crowd.

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