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Music on Monday (12/23/2019)—All the machines say, “We’re okay!”

The Music Chronicles of Russel Ray

Excel tells me that I have in my rock & roll music collection 4,260 digital files totaling 1,594 hours, 16 minutes, and 2 seconds. Some of them are individual songs and some are albums.

By listening to my collection for a mere 10 hours each and every day, it only takes me 159 days, 25 minutes, and 36 seconds to listen to everything. Done. Start over. I should disclose that I listen to my collection in chronological order.

File #4,261 will be “Software” by Grace Slick released in 1984.

Grace Slick was the first female rock ‘n’ roll singer whom I liked. I listened to “White Rabbit” and “Someone To Love” by Jefferson Airplane until my wise old grandmother thought that I was in love with a white rabbit. I stayed with Grace through her years with the Jefferson Starship and Starship, only recently discovering that she had four solo albums:

        1. Manhole – 1974 – Peaked at #127 on the Billboard album chart
        2. Dreams – 1980 – Peaked at #32
        3. Welcome to the Wrecking Ball! – 1981 – Peaked at #48
        4. Software – 1984 – Did not chart

I listened to all four albums yesterday. Surprisingly, I didn’t really like Manhole, Dreams, or Welcome to the Wrecking Ball!

Software, though, got my attention. Here’s the track listing:

        1. “Call It Right Call It Wrong”
        2. “Me and Me”
        3. “All the Machines”
        4. “Fox Face”
        5. “Through the Window”
        6. “It Just Won’t Stop”
        7. “Habits”
        8. “Rearrange My Face”
        9. “Bikini Atoll”

“All the Machines” was released as a single, and it is my favorite song on the album.

I was going to include the lyrics, but Musixmatch, the world’s largest collection of song lyrics, has the wrong lyrics. Since they are the world’s largest collection of song lyrics, everyone else has copied them and cited Musixmatch as their source. I think I have something to do later today….

The reviews of “All the Machines are not good. They had comments such as

        1. dated
        2. not your typical Grace Slick
        3. what happened to Grace Slick
        4. synthesizer heavy

I completely agree, but I don’t find any of those to be bad.

Anyway, here it is:

Music on Mondays (11-6-17)—Lost on a desert island, 1967

The Music Chronicles of Russel Ray

My Lost On A Desert Island music collection would have 28 songs from 1967 on it, 12 by The Beatles. Sadly, original Beatles songs are not available as videos on YouTube. Seems to me like someone is losing a lot of money since YouTube pays royalties when one watches a video.

I tried making private Beatles videos but it takes a while to make them and even longer to upload them to YouTube, so I’m giving up on that venture. In future Music on Mondays posts, I’ll just list the songs by The Beatles and you’ll have to search them out on your own. Here are the 12 from 1967:

  1. All You Need Is Love—Peaked at #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart.
  2. Eleanor Rigby—The B side of the Yellow Submarine single yet still made it up to #11 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart.
  3. Good Day Sunshine—Released as the B side to the Jukebox only single Here, There, And Everywhere.
  4. Got To Get You Into My Life—Not released as a single until 1976, 10 years after being released on the Revolver album and six years after The Beatles broke up. Made it up to #7 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1976.
  5. Hello, Goodbye—Peaked at #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart
  6. Here, There, and Everywhere—Released as a Jukebox only single in 1996.
  7. I Am The Walrus—Released as the B side of the Hello, Goodbye single.
  8. Penny Lane—Released with Strawberry Fields Forever as a double A-side single. Peaked at #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart.
  9. Strawberry Fields Forever—Released with Penny Lane as a double A-side single. Peaked at #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart.
  10. The Fool On The Hill—Released as the B side of the Jukebox only single Magical Mystery Tour in 1996.
  11. Yellow Submarine—Peaked at #2 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart.
  12. Your Mother Should Know—From the Magical Mystery Tour album. Not released as a single.

Following are the other 16 songs from 1967 that I would take with me if there were a possibility of being lost on a desert island.

Bottle Of Wine by The Fireballs
#9 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

Daydream Believer by The Monkees
#1 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

Get Together by The Youngbloods
#62 hit on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1967
by hit #5 when re-released in 1969

Harry Rag by The Kinks
From the album Something Else

Let’s Go To San Francisco by The Flowerpot Men
Did not chart in the United States but made it to #1 in Britain

Massachusetts by The Bee Gees
#11 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

San Francisco (Be Sure To Wear Flowers In Your Hair) by Scott McKenzie
#4 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

She’s A Rainbow by The Rolling Stones
#25 hit on the Billboard Hot 100
Quite possibly my favorite song by the Stones

Somebody To Love by Jefferson Airplane
#5 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

The 59th Street Bridge Song (Feelin’ Groovy) by Harpers Bizarre
#13 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

Tuesday Afternoon by The Moody Blues
#24 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

The Beat Goes On by Sonny & Cher
#6 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

Nights In White Satin by The Moody Blues
#103 on the Billboard Hot 100 “Bubbling Under” chart
but made it to #2 upon its re-release in 1972

Windy by The Association
#1 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

White Rabbit by Jefferson Airplane
My favorite by Jefferson Airplane.
I could listen to Grace Slick sing all day long.
#8 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

Who Will Answer? by Ed Ames
#19 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

Music on Mondays (1-2-17)—Hit me with a shot of Black Velvet

The Music Chronicles of Russel Ray

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

A couple of years ago one of my employees asked me who my favorite female singers were. He had noticed that my huge collection of music was pretty much devoid of female singers other than the occasional hit, such as “The Wayward Wind” by Gogi Grant.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Since that time I have continued adding to my digital music collection by going through “Top Pop Singles” by Joel Whitburn. Page by page. Song by song. Listening to those songs on YouTube. If a song doesn’t make a hit with me within 30 seconds, I move on. Occasionally I find a song that I really like, such as “Black Velvet” by Alannah Myles.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

When I find something I really really like, such as “Black Velvet,” I will go to Wikipedia and look up that artist’s discography and listen to more of the artist’s music. I bought Alannah’s first album, “Alannah Myles,” but that was it.

This process has resulted in me adding some female singers to my collection.

I discovered The Bangles beyond “Manic Monday” and “Walk Like An Egyptian.” I now have a complete collection of The Bangles’ music.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

I also discovered Bananarama, beyond “Venus,” which I had never liked anyway because it was a cover of the #1 hit by the Shocking Blue in 1970. I was 15 in 1970 and big into music, so a cover of that song 16 years later didn’t make it with me.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Listening to Bananarama’s version of “Venus” in 2016 with more of an open mind caused me to actually like it, and that caused me to check into Bananarama’s discography, of which I now have a complete collection, too.

They are not my favorite favorite female singer(s), though. That honor still belongs to Joan Jett.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Other favorite female singers that always have been well-represented in my music collection: Grace Slick (Jefferson Airplane & Jefferson Starship), Karen Carpenter, Stevie Nicks & Christine McVie (Fleetwood Mac and as solo artists).

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Other female singer(s) that I have discovered using my new technique: Bonnie Tyler, Laura Branigan, Adele, and Pat Benatar.

I have several songs and albums by the first three but not a complete collection of any of their music.

With Pat Benatar, however, I now have a complete collection of her music. She might be my #2 favorite female singer now behind Joan Jett.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat