Tag Archives: fauna

Zoey the Cool Cat’s birthday presents

Cats

Zoey the Cool Cat has been celebrating her birthday today. We adopted her from the El Cajon Animal Shelter on September 21, 2007, and the vet said she was about a year old, so we use September 21, 2006, as her birthday.

We couldn’t celebrate September 21 because I was feeling really bad. When I can’t even listen to The Beatles, you know I’m sick….

For her birthday she got a new sack….

Zoey the Cool Cat in her new sack

She was so happy, for an hour or so….

That was when she discovered that I also had a new box for her….

Zoey the Cool Cat in her new box

The little queen loves her sacks and boxes, especially if they are placed on the bed. Here are some pictures of past sacks and boxes:

Zoey the Cool Cat in her new sack

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Zoey the Cool Cat

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Zoey the Cool Cat

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Zoey the Cool Cat

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Zoey the Cool Cat

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Zoey the Cool Cat, Olympic boxing champion

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Zoey the Cool Cat, Olympic boxing champion

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

 I'm Zoey the Cool Cat, and I approve this post

Need a unique gift?
Visit Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos at Fine Art America.

photograhic art taking pictures making art

Advertisements
Unknown pet

But what is it?

Gene Mundt, mortgage lender with Chicagoland Mortgage Lending in Joliet, IllinoisThis post is dedicated to Gene Mundt, the guy with the money if you want to buy a home, i.e., he’s a mortgage lender with Chicagoland Mortgage Lending in Joliet, Illinois. I have known Gene for about three years through a real estate professional networking site. I highly recommend him for anyone needing some money to buy a home in Illinois. He might even be licensed in other states, so if you need mortgage money, contact Gene. If he can’t help you, I’ll bet he can point you to someone who can.

Dedications are my way of trying to provide a little extra Google juice for people I have come to know and respect over the years.

Picture of the moment

I’ve been interesed in living, breathing organisms (other than people) since I was very young. I’ve had all sorts of pets — snakes, lizards, cats, dogs, pigs, cows, horses, monkey, all kinds of birds, hamsters, fish, iguana, rats, mice, ant farm, spiders, ferret.

There is at least one pet that I haven’t had, and it looks like this:

Unknown pet

Unknown pet

That pet was at the house where I was doing a home inspection this morning. No one knew what it was and the sellers were not there to tell us. I loved its big ears! It appeared to be friendly but, of course, I didn’t want to test that appearance by sticking my fingers too close. It’s a great climber, too; it had no problem climbing up the wire sides of its cage.

But what is it? I have no idea.

This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

If you don’t attract the birds you want, switch bird feed

Picture of the momentThe plants in my gardens were planted for one of three specific reasons:

  • They use little water (cactus and native vegetation)
  • They attract butterflies
  • They attract birds, specifically hummingbirds

In order to attract other birds, I supplement the plants with bird feeders. The feed that I had been using was attracting house finches (which I love) and mourning doves (which I can take or leave).

House finch (Carpodacus mexicanus)
House finch

Mourning doves (Zenaida macroura)Mourning doves

A few days ago when I went to Walmart to get some more feed, there was a
40-pound bag on sale for just $17.44. I couldn’t resist it even though I had never used that brand before.

The house finches and mourning doves still come around, but I’m now being visited by bluebirds and cedar waxwings.

Western bluebird (Sialia mexicana)
and three
Cedar waxwings (Bombycilla cedrorum)
Bluebird and three cedar waxwings

That western bluebird, a female, doesn’t look too happy that she’s outnumbered by the three cedar waxwings.

Find other posts in my Picture of the Moment series by clicking on the logo at the upper right.

This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

Sea lion posing for the camera

Picture of the momentThere are two places to see seals and sea lions in San Diego, one in La Jolla and one at the north end of San Diego Bay near the submarine base. La Jolla is easier and less expensive to get to, but the ones near the submarine base are usually much more active. Unfortunately, in order to get to the ones near the submarine base, you have to either have a boat, rent a boat, or go on some sort of cruise.

Here’s an alpha male sea lion that posed for me recently when I went on a whale watching cruise:

Sea lion in San Diego Bay near the submarine base

 

Seals and sea lions are very similar in appearance, but there is one sure way you can tell the difference: sea lions have external ear flaps; seals don’t.

Pictures taken by Russel Ray using a Canon 550D.
Post-processing done in Corel PaintShop Pro X4.

Find other posts in my Picture of the Moment series by clicking on the logo at the upper right.

This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

Why do we get excited….

Picture of the momentWhy do we get excited….

I go at least once a week to the Zoo or Safari Park. With all the interesting animals there — komodo dragon, elephants, giraffes…. — why do we get excited when we see a wild rabbit?

Wild rabbit at the San Diego Zoo's Safari Park

Wild rabbit at the San Diego Zoo's Safari Park

Moms, dads, kids, and me! were standing around taking pictures of the little rabbit, which I’m pretty sure is a cottontail.

Pictures taken by Russel Ray on January 30, 2012, using a Canon 550D.
Post-processing done in Corel PaintShop Pro X4.

Find other posts in my Picture of the Moment series by clicking on the logo at the upper right.

This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

Location, location, location….

Picture of the momentLocation, location, location…

This is the first in my Picture of the Moment series. You’ll always be able to identify this series by the logo in the upper right corner. This series is more picture, less text.

 

Buoy with seagulls and seals

 

The seagulls have the view;
the seals are closer to the swimming pool.

 

x marks the spot

 

Pictures taken by Russel Ray on January 27, 2012, using a Canon 550D.
Post-processing done in Corel PaintShop Pro X4.

 

This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

Mother of thousands

Russel Ray Photos logo

When I was a young lad growing up in Kingsville, Texas, my wise old grandmother gave me a little plot of land in a bad location where I could have my own little garden. Since it was such a bad location (no rain and very hot), I determined that the best things to grow in my little garden were cactus and succulents.

Cactus didn’t appeal to my wise old grandmother because of the thorns. However, she told me I could grow what I wanted.

I went with a friend and his parents down to McAllen, in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas, one weekend to pick some cactus and succulents from a cactus farm there. That was in 1967. I came home that day with an interesting plant that has now been in my gardens for 45 years. It was a Kalanchoe daigremontiana, and what attracted me to it were the little plantlets growing along the edges of all its leaves (see Wikipedia). One of its common names is mother of thousands. Each little plantlet that falls off the leaves grows into its own plant, so after a couple of years, you could indeed have many thousands of plants.

Many plants that reproduce by vegetative propagation don’t bloom since they don’t need seeds. I had never seen the mother of thousands bloom until a couple of days ago when I was exploring my own neighborhood here, a neighborhood where I have lived for five years. The mother of thousands also has thousands of blossoms on a stalk with a huge inflorescence, and I found several of them blooming. I wondered what it took to get them to bloom, but Wikipedia says that flowering occurs sporadically if at all.

Following are four pictures of the many blossoms on the inflorescence — side, top, bottom, and dead flowers covered with raindrops.

Mother of thousands flower head from the side

Mother of thousands flower stalk from the top

 

Mother of thousands flower stalk from below

 

Mother of thousands dead flowers covered with raindrops

 

The mother of thousands is native to Madagascar, and all parts of the plant are poisonous. Pets generally know this, but inquisitve youth who are still in the put-anything-in-their-mouths stage might find the little leaf plantlets tasty.

Courtesy of Margaret Rome, a real estate agent in Baltimore, Maryland, I was reminded by a phone call while I was writing this post that today would have been my wise old grandmother’s 101st birthday; she died in 2003. If you want to buy or sell a home in the Baltimore area, do it with Margaret Rome!

 

This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat