Tag Archives: creedence clearwater revival

Music on Mondays (11-27-17)—Lost on a desert island, 1970, part 1

The Music Chronicles of Russel Ray

My Lost On A Desert Island music collection would have 53 songs from 1970 on it, 8 by The Beatles, all from Let It Be. I’m pretty sure Let It Be ranks as my #2 Beatles album behind Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. Original Beatles songs are not available as videos on YouTube so I cannot provide any links to such videos. I leave it to you to search out Beatles videos or simply put on your own music and start singing! Here are the 8 from 1970:

  1. Two Of Us
  2. Across The Universe
  3. Let It Be
  4. I’ve Got A Feeling
  5. One After 909
  6. The Long & Winding Road
  7. For You Blue
  8. Get Back

Following are the next 23 songs from 1970 that I would take with me if there were a possibility of being lost on a desert island. With the breakup of The Beatles, this was the year that I started exploring darker, heavier music, much to the chagrin of my wise old grandmother. She understood Let It Be and The Long & Winding Road. Not so much Deep Purple and Black Sabbath.

25 Or 6 To 4 by Chicago
#4 hit on the Billboard Hot 100
Chicago’s first song to reach the Top 5

Bridge Over Troubled Water by Simon & Garfunkel
#1 hit on the Billboard Hot 100
Won the 1971 Grammy for “Record of the Year” and “Song of the Year”

Cecilia by Simon & Garfunkel
#4 hit on the Billboard Hot 100
I always wanted to date a Cecilia so I could sing this to her.

Colour My World by Chicago
Released twice, both times as the B side to other singles
Make Me Smile in 1970 and Beginnings in 1971
The first non-classical song that I learned on the piano.
video

Easy Come, Easy Go by Bobby Sherman
#9 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

El Condor Pasa (If I Could) by Simon & Garfunkel
#18 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

Ma Belle Amie by The Tee Set
#5 hit on the Billboard Hot 100
Until I went to YouTube for this blog post,
I had no idea that this was a “Gay Tune.”
Should I turn in my Gay Card?

The Boxer by Simon & Garfunkel
#7 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

Spirit In The Sky by Norman Greenbaum
#3 hit on the Billboard Hot 100
Forty years later I won a music trivia contest by being able
to name this song after just 3 notes.

Love Grows (Where My Rosemary Goes) by Edison Lighthouse
#5 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

Come & Get It by Badfinger
#7 hit on the Billboard Hot 100
Written by Paul McCartney.

Shilo by Neil Diamond
#24 hit on the Billboard Hot 100
My aunt in Los Angeles introduced me to Neil Diamond in 1968.

Hitchin’ A Ride by Vanity Fare
#5 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

Add Some Music To Your Day by The Beach Boys
#64 hit on the Billboard Hot 100
One of my favorite songs about music.

Go Back by Crabby Appleton
#36 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

Ride Captain Ride by Blues Image
#4 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

Gimme Dat Ding by The Pipkins
#9 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

Black Knight by Deep Purple
#66 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

Evil Woman by Black Sabbath
#19 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

Wicked World by Black Sabbath
From their eponymous debut album

Lookin’ Out My Back Door by Creedence Clearwater Revival
#2 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

Who’ll Stop The Rain? by Creedence Clearwater Revival
#2 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

I Heard It Through The Grapevine by Creedence Clearwater Revival
#43  hit on the Billboard Hot 100
The single was 3:50; it’s this 11:11 album version that really turns me on.

I'm Zoey the Cool Cat, and I approve this post

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Music on Mondays (11-20-17)—Lost on a desert island, 1969

The Music Chronicles of Russel Ray

My Lost On A Desert Island music collection would have 22 songs from 1969 on it, 4 by The Beatles, all from Abbey Road. Original Beatles songs are not available as videos on YouTube so I cannot provide any links to such videos. I leave it to you to search out Beatles videos or simply put on your own music and start singing! Here are the 4 from 1969:

  1. Come Together
  2. Something
  3. Maxwell’s Silver Hammer
  4. Here Comes The Sun

Following are the other 18 songs from 1969 that I would take with me if there were a possibility of being lost on a desert island.

A Boy Named Sue by Johnny Cash
#2 hit on the Billboard Hot 100
Johnny Cash’s only Top 10 hit

And When I Die by Blood, Sweat & Tears
#2 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

Cold Turkey by Plastic Ono Band
#30 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

Cotton Fields by Creedence Clearwater Revival
A non-charting single released in 1982

Day Is Done by Peter, Paul & Mary
#21 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

Dear Diary by The Moody Blues
From the album On The Threshold Of A Dream

Honky Tonky Women by The Rolling Stones
#1 hit on the Billboard Hot 100
Kept Johnny Cash from having a #1 hit

I Can Hear Music by The Beach Boys
#24 hit on the Billboard Hot 100
One of my favorite songs by The Beach Boys

In The Year 2525 (Exordium & Terminus) by Zager & Evans
#1 hit on the Billboard Hot 100
Probably my favorite song from 1969

Laughing by The Guess Who
#10 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

Lazy Day by The Moody Blues
From the album On The Threshold Of A Dream

Make Your Own Kind Of Music by Mama Cass Elliot
#36 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

Marrakesh Express by Crosby Stills & Nash
#28 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

Pinball Wizard by The Who
#19 hit on the Billboard Hot 100
Other than chess and 42, I have never been much of a games person.
I did, however, play a lot of pinball at the Dixie Chicken during my college days at Texas A&M University, 1973-1977.

Sugar, Sugar by The Archies
#1 hit on the Billboard Hot 100
And they weren’t even a real group!

Sweet Caroline by Neil Diamond
#4 hit on the Billboard Hot 100
Probably my favorite song by Neil Diamond

These Eyes by The Guess Who
#6 hit on the Billboard Hot 100
Their first Top 10 hit in the United States.

Undun by The Guess Who
#22 hit on the Billboard Hot 100

I'm Zoey the Cool Cat, and I approve this post

Music on Mondays (8/21/17)—I don’t believe in the sun

The Music Chronicles of Russel Ray

With all the fascination about the eclipse today, I couldn’t help but wonder why so many Republicans and Regressives didn’t call predictions about the eclipse’s path and its totality as fake news like they do with climate change, vaccines, evolution. Even at the age of 62, I always find myself amazed at people….

Here are seven sun & moon songs from my music collection:

“Eclipse” by Pink Floyd, 1973
When the sun is eclipsed by the moon

“Silver Age” by Pet Shop Boys, 1999
Earthquakes predicted and someday soon,
a total eclipse of the sun and the moon

“Total Eclipse” by The Alan Parsons Project, 1977

“Here Comes The Moon” by George Harrison, 1979
Everybody’s talking up a storm

“Bad Moon Rising” by Creedence Clearwater Revival, 1969
I see trouble on the way. I see bad times today.

“I Don’t Believe in the Sun” by The Magnetic Fields, 1999
I don’t believe in the sun.
How could it shine down on everyone and never shine on me?

I'm Zoey the Cool Cat, and I approve this post

Music on Mondays (4-10-17)—This isn’t what the governmeant

The Music Chronicles of Russel Ray

Currently in my non-classical music collection I have 1,438 hours 18 minutes and 17 seconds of music. I listen to it in chronological order and average about 10 hours a day, which means it takes me just over 143 days to listen to it all. Just after midnight 13 hours ago, I started listening to 1972. Here are the 1972 albums in my collection in the order in which I will sing along:

  1. Bang by Bang
  2. Mother/Bow to the King by Bang
  3. America by America
  4. Loose by Crazy Horse
  5. Baby I’m-A-Want You by Bread
  6. Paul Simon by Paul Simon
  7. Harvest by Neil Young
  8. Rockin’ by The Guess Who
  9. Bare Trees by Fleetwood Mac
  10. Joy by Apollo 100
  11. Thick as a Brick by Jethro Tull
  12. Machine Head by Deep Purple
  13. On Record by April Wine
  14. Rio Grande Mud by Z Z Top
  15. Mardi Gras by Creedence Clearwater Revival
  16. Demons & Wizards by Uriah Heep
  17. Exile on Main Street by The Rolling Stones
  18. Honky Chateau by Elton John
  19. Blue Oyster Cult by Blue Oyster Cult
  20. Foghat by Foghat
  21. School’s Out by Alice Cooper
  22. Living in the Past by Jethro Tull
  23. Toulouse Street by The Doobie Brothers
  24. Eagles by The Eagles
  25. Obscured by Clouds by Pink Floyd
  26. All Together Now by Argent
  27. Straight Shooter by James Gang
  28. Chicago V by Chicago
  29. Trilogy by Emerson Lake & Palmer
  30. Seven Separate Fools by Three Dog Night
  31. The Slider by T Rex
  32. Summer Breeze by Seals & Crofts
  33. Black Sabbath Vol 4 by Black Sabbath
  34. Phoenix by Grand Funk
  35. Close to the Edge by Yes
  36. At Crooked Lake by Crazy Horse
  37. Barnstorm by Joe Walsh
  38. Fresh by Raspberries
  39. Loggins & Messina by Loggins & Messina
  40. Guitar Man by Bread
  41. To Whom It May Concern by Bee Gees
  42. Can’t Buy A Thrill by Steely Dan
  43. Homecoming by America
  44. Seventh Sojourn by The Moody Blues
  45. The Magician’s Birthday by Uriah Heep
  46. They Only Come Out at Night by The Edgar Winter Group
  47. REO-TWO by REO Speedwagon

When I turned 18 on March 11, 1973, 33 of my friends gave me a surprise birthday party. All of them knew that I played the piano and the violin, and sang, and that I loved music, so many of my birthday gifts involved music. Some of them went together to pool their money and buy me albums. Previously all I had were 45 singles. The first three albums in my collection came from this birthday party: Black Sabbath Vol 4 by Black Sabbath, Machine Head by Deep Purple, and Seventh Sojourn by The Moody Blues. Those three albums were the start of the beginning of the end; I was off to the races collecting albums instead of singles.

So which is my favorite? Whichever one I’m currently listening to.

I do have some many favorite songs, though. Here are just five of them:

“This Isn’t What the Governmeant” by Bread

“Duncan” by Paul Simon

“Listen to the Music” by The Doobie Brothers

“Witchy Woman” by The Eagles

“Abaddon’s Bolero” by Emerson Lake & Palmer

Thanks for stopping by! See you next time!

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This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

Music on Mondays (2-6-17)—Normal people don’t

The Music Chronicles of Russel Ray

When I get sad, depressed, and suicidal (my dad committed suicide), I try to do something unusual, or I sleep, or I read, or I shop, or I disappear.

Yesterday, I disappeared. I’m back.

I drove 573 miles yesterday in search of unique locations in which to take pictures and videos of trains.

Here’s a cool railroad tunnel that I found yesterday, used by Metrolink on its journey from Los Angeles east to Lancaster and Palmdale.

Metrolink railroad tunnel

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

I had a lot of music with me, as always, but I didn’t have any train songs. Interesting.

Since I was on a search for interesting, unique locations, I thought I’d post a couple of interesting, unique songs about trains.

First up is “The Carrollton March” by Philip Antony Corri. He was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, began composing in 1802, helped found the London Philharmonic Society and the Royal Academy of Music, and by the 1820s, had adopted the name Arthur Clifton and settled in Baltimore, Maryland.

“The Carrollton March” is the earliest known “train song,” having been copyrighted on July 1, 1828. Clifton composed it to commemorate the July 4 groundbreaking of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. It’s a solo piano piece here but I don’t know if it was originally solo piano or if it was transposed by the pianist here.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

This next one, “Cross Tie Walker” by Creedence Clearwater Revival, was very much me in my youth. I still walk the cross ties occasionally although getting caught doing so can be a significant fine.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Here’s a picture I got last month in a lonely, forsaken place where I was talking the cross ties. I was out near the border with Mexico, so I got stopped five times by the Border Patrol. After all, normal people don’t walk abandoned railroad tracks out in the desert near the Mexican border………..

Walking the ties

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

Music on Mondays (11-2-15)—Don’t go walkin’ in the woods alone

The Music Chronicles of Russel Ray

Music always has been a significant part of my life since my mom played the piano and organ, her parents played the violin and flute, and I played the piano and violin, as well as sang. Although I have an appreciation for classical music, I prefer full orchestra over solos, duos, trios, quartets, quintets, sextets, and octets.

When I was introduced to The Beatles in late 1965, I fell in love with pop music. After I graduated from Texas A&M University, I set out to own all of the singles and albums that had made it to #1 on the Billboard charts during the rock ‘n’ roll era, generally said to have started in 1955, the same year I was born. That led me to Casey Kasem (1932-2014) and his American Top 40 weekly broadcast, as well as books by Joel Whitburn documenting the Billboard charts.

Music trivia became a part of my life, so much so that I won several weekly happy hour music trivia contests in Houston and College Station during the ’80s.

Two areas of music trivia I always have found interesting: “one-hit wonders” and “most #2 hits without having a #1 hit.”

Creedence Clearwater Revival held (and probably still holds) the record for most #2 hits without having a #1 hit with five #2’s: Proud Mary, Bad Moon Rising, Green River, Travelin’ Band, and Lookin’ Out My Back Door. They also had a #3, #4, #6, and #8. I have a complete Creedence Clearwater Revival discography; I like their music since it’s easy to sing along.

Another group on the “most #2 hits without having a #1 hit” list is Sam the Sham & The Pharoahs, with two #2 hits: Wooly Bully and Lil’ Red Riding Hood. I always liked Lil’ Red Riding Hood and just discovered that it was not in my digital music collection. It is now.

This song, while building on Charles Perrault’s fairy tale “Little Red Riding Hood,” is more about the man with concealed sexual intentions rather than the animal, although some might say that the man with ulterior sexual intentions is an animal….

The singer remarks on the “big eyes” and “full lips” that Red Riding Hood has. An added element is that he says to the song’s audience that he is disguised in a “sheep suit” until he can demonstrate his good intentions. Note that instead of a sheep’s baah the song uses a wolf call in the form of a howl.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

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Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

I'm Zoey the Cool Cat, and I approve this post