Tag Archives: casa de pedrorena san diego

San Diego Historical Landmarks—#14D: Casa de Pedrorena

San Diego Historical Landmarks

Old Town San Diego State Historic ParkWithin Old Town San Diego State Historic Park (San Diego Historical Landmark #14) are many historic buildings and rebuilds. We’ll explore nine of them since they also have been designated San Diego Historical Landmarks.

The fourth one, San Diego Historical Landmark #14C, is Casa de Pedrorena.

Casa de Pedrorena

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Miguel de Pedrorena JrCasa de Pedrorena was built in 1869 by Miguel de Pedrorena Jr (picture ►), a wealthy stockman. His dad, a native of Madrid, Spain, living in Peru had come to San Diego as a ship’s agent, marrying into the prominent Estudillo family in 1842. Although he claimed the lot adjacent to the Estudillo home in Old Town, the historic Casa de Estudillo, he died in 1850 before he could build a home.

One online source states that the structure was built in 1850 by Miguel Sr. Since he died on March 21, 1850, I’m going to go with it being built in 1869 by Miguel Jr. I just don’t believe an adobe or framed home could be built in San Diego at that time in a mere 2½ months.

A plaque on the grounds (lower right corner of picture above) states that Casa de Pedrorena was the final adobe built in Old Town, and one online source states that its thick adobe and mud-plastered, whitewashed walls were typical of Mexican adobes in the area. However, the shingled roof, as well as the mill-sawn, wood-columned front porch, reflected American building practices.

Other online sources state categorically that Casa de Pedrorena was “one of” the first frame houses in Old Town.” Several sources state that it was “the first frame house” built in Old Town. Here is a picture taken around 1920:

Casa de Pedrorena

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

I looked closely at the building exterior but could not determine whether it was a wood-frame building or an adobe. I guess I’ll just leave it at that. As my wise old grandmother said, “It is what it is.”

Miguel Sr. came from one of the best families in Madrid, being educated there and at Oxford University. He served as a captain in the United States Cavalry during the Mexican-American War. He was in the forefront of the attack against Fort Stockton when it was finally captured.

El Jupiter cannon in the Junipero Serra Museum in San DiegoDuring the early part of the war, he had buried under his house (or the patio behind it, one source says) El Jupiter (picture ►), the old bronze cannon now on display at the Junipero Serra Museum (see my post here) in order to prevent its being used against the Americans.

Miguel Sr. was a member of the California Constitutional Convention which met in Monterey, California, in 1849. He was a member of the group headed by William Heath Davis which attempted to found New Town in 1850, an attempt that failed because of the lack of fresh water.

Miguel Jr. gave Casa de Pedrorena to his sister, Isabel de Altamirano, in January 1871, a gift that joined together two pioneer California families. Isabel and her husband, José Antonio Altamirano, raised their family in the home.

Although some sources call the home “Casa de Pedrorena y Altamirano,” Altamirano also owned the little frame house next door where the San Diego Union newspaper was first published in 1868. The newspaper building is more traditionally connected with Altamirano’s name rather than Casa de Pedrorena.

Casa de Pedrorena remained a family residence until 1907, although one source says “until the 1890s.” It was restored in 1996 by California State Parks and is said to be one of five historic 19th century adobes in Old Town State Historic Park. Currently it is a gem, jewelry, and rock shop, open daily from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. There are two old railroad mining cars located on the property:

Railroad mining car at Casa de Pedrorena in Old Town San Diego State Historic Park

Railroad mining car at Casa de Pedrorena in Old Town San Diego State Historic Park

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

For the introductory blog post
to San Diego’s historical landmarks,
click on San Diego’s Historical Landmarks.

For previous posts in the
San Diego Historical Landmarks series,
go here.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Need a unique gift?
Anniversary? Birthday? Graduation? Marriage?
Choose Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos at Fine Art America.

Photographic Art logo

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

I'm Zoey the Cool Cat, and I approve this post

San Diego Historical Landmarks—#14: Old Town San Diego State Historic Park

San Diego Historical Landmarks

Old Town San Diego State Historic Park was designated a San Diego Historical Landmark on November 6, 1970.

Old Town San Diego State Historic Park

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

I will have to break #14 into parts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 & 10

(That was fun! Normally I would have written 1-10.)

because along with the State Historic Park itself, there are nine buildings in the park that are state historical landmarks.

Presidio in San DiegoThe first European settlement on the West Coast of the present-day United States was the San Diego Presidio (picture ►), a military outpost of Spanish California located on the hilltop overlooking what is now Old Town.

The hill, now known as Presidio Hill, was the primary settlement for several decades because it could be defended easily against attack by European enemies or hostile Indians. As settlers streamed into the area, they preferred to live at the base of the bluffs for safety and convenience, and in the 1820s the town of San Diego grew at the base of the bluff at the site commemorated by Old Town San Diego State Historic Park.

The Old Town area was the center of government and commerce for the region, and in 1834 the Mexican government granted San Diego the status of a pueblo or chartered town, a status that was revoked in 1838 because of declining population. The main problem limiting San Diego’s growth was its location inland, far from navigable waters.

Old Town San Diego State Historic ParkWhen California was admitted to the United States in 1850, San Diego was made the county seat of San Diego County, even though its population was only 650. The Old Town area remained the heart of San Diego until the 1860s when Alonzo Horton, a newcomer to San Diego, began to promote development at the site of present-day downtown San Diego. Residents and businesses quickly abandoned “Old Town” for Horton’s “New Town” because of New Town’s proximity to shipping. Government records were moved in 1871 from Old Town to a new county courthouse in New Town. It was at that point that New Town permanently eclipsed Old Town as the focal point of San Diego.

Old Town San Diego State Historic Park preserves and recreates Old Town as it existed during the Mexican and early American periods, from its settlement in 1821 through 1869.

Old Town San Diego State Historic ParkOld Town is a popular tourist destination known particularly for its Mexican restaurants. Throughout the Park, as well as the surrounding area, are museums, superb eating establishments, and your typical gift shops and other tourist traps.

As far back as 1992, and as recently as 2006, Old Town State Historic Park was the most visited California state park. Attendance dropped dramatically in the following years due to the State’s miscalculation in firing Diane Powers, a local designer and the major commercial contractor since 1969, and replacing her with Delaware North Companies. The intent was to create a more authentic and historically correct understanding and appreciation of life and commerce in San Diego as it was from 1821 to 1872. Didn’t work.

Delaware North withdrew from its management contract in early 2009 but the damage was done, and attendance was not recovered to the pre-Delaware North levels.

In the next nine blog posts in my San Diego Historical Landmarks series, we’ll explore more about the historical structures located within in Old Town State Historic Park:

  • Casa de Estudillo—an 1827 adobe house and a National Historic Land
  • Casa de Cota site—site of an adobe built in 1835 and destroyed by United States Army bulldozers during World War II.
  • Casa de Bandini—an 1829 adobe
  • Casa de Pedrorena—home built in 1869
  • Casa de Machada-Silvas (de la Bandera)—an 1840s adobe
  • Congress Hall site—Built in 1867 and destroyed in 1939, Congress Hall served at various times as a wild west saloon and gambling hall, a rooming house, a post office, a bakery, and a Pony Express office.
  • Casa de Machada-Stewart—a restored 1830s adobe
  • Mason Street School—the first public schoolhouse in San Diego, built in 1865
  • The Exchange Hotel site—no known pictures, drawings, or description of this hotel exist. It was first mentioned in a local newspaper advertisement of May 29, 1851, as a “hotel and billiard saloon.”

Of course, there is more history behind the adobes, and its fascinating history, too!

Mason Street schoohouse

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

For the introductory blog post
to San Diego’s historical landmarks,
click on San Diego’s Historical Landmarks.

For previous posts in the
San Diego Historical Landmarks series,
go here.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Need a unique gift?
Anniversary? Birthday? Graduation? Marriage?
Choose Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos at Fine Art America.

Photographic Art logo

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

I'm Zoey the Cool Cat, and I approve this post