Tag Archives: balboa park san diego

San Diego Historical Landmarks — #1: El Prado Area Designation, part 18

San Diego Historical Landmarks

For the introductory blog post to San Diego’s historical landmarks, click on San Diego’s Historical Landmarks.

#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 1
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 2
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 3
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 4
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 5
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 6
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 7
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 8
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 9
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 10
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 11
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 12
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 13
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 14
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 15
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 16
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 17

El Prado Area Designation

View Larger Map

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

This is it, Folks! Our last stop on the El Prado Designation Area, and it’s a beautiful one, too. Looks like this:

Bea Evenson Fountain in San Diego's Balboa ParkBea Evenson Fountain & Reuben H. Fleet Science Center
in San Diego’s Balboa Park

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

That’s the Bea Evenson Fountain. It sits in the plaza between the Reuben H. Fleet Science Center in the picture (also see part 17) and the San Diego Natural History Museum (see part 16).

If you’re like me, you are wondering why Bea Evenson gets a beautiful fountain. Well….

Bea Evenson and Natural History Museum in San Diego's Balboa ParkBea Evenson Fountain and Natural History Museum
in San Diego’s Balboa Park.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Bea Evenson is the person pretty much directly responsible for us having most of the beautiful buildings along El Prado. History reports that many of the buildings were built as temporary structures for the 1915 Panama-California Exhibition. They were to be torn down after the Exhibition, but the citizenry took a liking to them and they were allowed to stand.

By the 1960s, however, the temporary structures were in a state of serious disrepair and certainly would not be able to withstand a significant earthquake. They were scheduled to be demolished in the mid-1960s.

Children playing in Bea Evenson Fountain in San Diego's Balboa Park

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Bea Evenson refused to sit idly by while the beautiful buildings were destroyed. She created a Committee of 100 to work at saving the buildings, hoping to get 100 people working to help preserve the buildings. Instead, of 1,000 people stepped up to the plate.

A bond measure was passed by the voters, and funds were raised to renovate the buildings, retaining the exterior designs but incorporating a more practical interior. Plastic molds were made of all the bas-relief sculptures so that the new façade would be identical to the old. Some of the original sculptures are on display in various areas of Balboa Park.

Without Bea Evanson, the El Prado Designation Area would be without many of the buildings that we have visited on our trek down El Prado.

So here’s to Bea Evanson, the Committee of 100, and all the Bea Evansons of the world who refuse to let history be destroyed.

Bea Evenson Fountain in San Diego's Balboa Park

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

This post approved by
This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

Need a unique gift?
Visit Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos at Fine Art America.
photograhic art taking pictures making art

Advertisements

Fire on the horizon (also called “sunrise”)

Picture of the Moment

When I started composing my post this morning about the Reuben H. Fleet Science Center, I realized that I, uh, didn’t have any pictures of the Reuben H. Fleet Science Center. Or at least, none that I could find.

That was at 5:00 a.m., so I jumped in the car and headed to Balboa Park. The sun was due to come up around 6:00 a.m., and the park would not yet be crowded, so I should be able to get back home by 7:30 a.m.

And I did, even though I waited around for 15 minutes to get these two pictures:

Fire on the horizon

Sunrise in San Diego's Balboa Park on Sunday, 9-14-14

There are exactly fifteen minutes between the two pictures.

copy-image002.jpg

This post approved by This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

Need a unique gift?
Visit Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos at Fine Art America.

photograhic art taking pictures making art

San Diego Historical Landmarks — #1: El Prado Area Designation, part 17

San Diego Historical Landmarks

For the introductory blog post to San Diego’s historical landmarks, click on San Diego’s Historical Landmarks.

#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 1
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 2
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 3
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 4
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 5
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 6
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 7
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 8
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 9
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 10
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 11
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 12
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 13
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 14
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 15
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 16

El Prado Area Designation

View Larger Map

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Our final building to visit in the El Prado Designation Area is the Reuben H. Fleet Science Center. Looks like this:

Reuben H. Fleet Science Center in San Diego's Balboa Park

Also known as “The Fleet,” its mission statement is to inspire lifelong learning by furthering the public understanding and enjoyment of science and technology. I’m presuming today’s current crops of right-wing political religious fundamentalists (also known as Republicans) would not enjoy the museum. I, however, do.

The Fleet has more than one hundred interactive science exhibits in eight galleries, and that doesn’t include the major traveling exhibitions that stop by each year. Since opening in 1973, the Fleet consistently ranks as one of San Diego’s most-visited museums.

Reuben H. Fleet Science Center in San Diego's Balboa Park

The Fleet is home to the world’s first IMAX Dome Theater; its unique configuration wraps the audience in images and provides the illusion of being suspended in space. Just because it was first, though, doesn’t mean it’s behind the times. The theater was renovated in two phases, 2008 and 2012, to update the interior, and install a modern sound system, a seamless screen, and a art digital projection system to the theater. Major funding for the renovation was provided by the Heikoffs. Renamed The Eugene Heikoff and Marilyn Jacobs Heikoff Dome Theater, it now shows both IMAX films and planetarium shows on the NanoSeam screen, providing audiences with viewing experience like nowhere else in Southern California.

The Heikoff Giant Dome Theater show takes audiences from outer space to under water and every place in between. The theater also plays host to planetarium shows, including the monthly Sky Tonight show, led by an astronomer, and followed by outdoor telescope viewing, courtesy of the San Diego Astronomy Association.

Visit the Reuben H. Fleet Science Center online for current exhibits, hours, and admission costs.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

This post approved byThis post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

Need a unique gift?
Visit Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos at Fine Art America.
photograhic art taking pictures making art

San Diego Historical Landmarks — #1: El Prado Area Designation, part 16

San Diego Historical Landmarks

For the introductory blog post to San Diego’s historical landmarks, click on San Diego’s Historical Landmarks.

#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 1
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 2
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 3
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 4
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 5
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 6
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 7
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 8
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 9
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 10
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 11
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 12
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 13
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 14
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 15

El Prado Area Designation

View Larger Map

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

The last place to visit on the north side of the El Prado on our easterly trek is the San Diego Natural History Museum:

San Diego Natural History MuseumPictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

San Diego Natural History MuseumNatural history, of course, is just about anything that doesn’t involve humans, such as minerals and wildlife.

They often have exhibits specifically for schoolchildren, so it’s not unusual to see huge crowds of schoolchildren waiting to go in together. This fall they have “Weekly Science Sundays with Ms. Frizzle” and

I don’t go as often as I should, and I don’t really know why because I really enjoy natural history.

The museum has a huge collection of preserved reptiles:

Preserved reptile specimens

(I’d rather see living reptiles, and for that I go to the San Diego Zoo.)

My favorite exhibits are usually the traveling exhibits, such as the All That Glitters exhibit from a few years ago. Here are a few butterflies from All That Glitters:

butterfly (4)

butterfly (3)

butterfly (2)

butterfly (1)

The upper floors also feature artwork, of which this was my favorite when I was last there:

Dogs

The museum occasionally has somewhat whimsical art on exhibit, such as this man climbing a rope on the north side of the museum:

Man on a rope

No. It wasn’t a real man but it was garnering a lot of attention from passersby.

The upcoming exhibit that I want to see is The Discovery of King Tut, opening October 11, 2014. I missed King Tut when he toured the world a decade ago. Not this time. Advance ticket purchase is strongly recommended.

The Museum is open seven days a week from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. except for being closed on Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day.

Admission is $17 for adults, $15 for those age 62 and over; $12 for military with ID, college students with ID, and youth age 13-17; $11 for children age 3-12; and free for children under the age of 3. There also are discounts for groups of ten or more, but reservations must be made in advance.

Visit online at the San Diego Natural History Museum.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

This post approved byThis post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

Need a unique gift?
Visit Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos at Fine Art America.
photograhic art taking pictures making art

San Diego Historical Landmarks — #1: El Prado Area Designation, part 14

San Diego Historical Landmarks

For the introductory blog post to San Diego’s historical landmarks, click on San Diego’s Historical Landmarks.

#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 1
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 2
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 3
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 4
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 5
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 6
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 7
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 8
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 9
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 10
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 11
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 12
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 13

El Prado Area Designation

View Larger Map

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Next up on our trek through the El Prado Area Designation is Casa de Balboa:

Casa de Balboa

Of all the buildings in Balboa Park, I visit Casa de Balboa most often because my three favorite museums in all of Balboa Park are there:

San Diego Model Railroad Museum
Museum of Photographic Arts
San Diego History Center

San Diego Model Railroad Museum in Balboa ParkThe San Diego Model Railroad Museum has one of the largest model railroad layouts in all the world, is the only accredited model railroad museum in the United States, and is the largest permanent operating model railroad exhibit in North America with over 27,000 square feet of exhibit space.

The museum is particularly popular with children, especially the Toy Train Gallery, home to several model towns with multiple train lines. The towns get decorated for the seasons, which makes the fall colors and Christmas particularly colorful. San Diego Model Railroad Museum in Balboa ParkSeveral of the train lines can be operated by the kids (or adults like me!) with pushbutton controls.

The museum gift shop has a great selection of railroad memorabilia, including vintage railroad posters, for railroad lovers like me. Sadly, my budget won’t let me buy the whole dang store…. If you are into railroads and history, you can easily spend days on end in the Erwin Welsch Research Library.San Diego Model Railroad Museum in Balboa Park

The museum and gift shop are open Tuesday through Friday, 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday 11:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. Admission is $8 for adults, $6 for seniors 65 and older, $3 for students with ID, $4 for all military with ID, and free for children 14 years and under when accompanied with an adult.

San Diego Model Railroad Museum

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

The purpose of the Museum of Photographic Arts is to inspire, educate, and engage the broadest possible audience through the presentation, collection, and preservation of photography, film, and video. They do a great job, and I often get inspiration for my own Photographic Art by visiting the museum.

Earlier in the 21st Century I tried to volunteer at the San Diego History Center. At the time, there was a long waiting list for opportunities to volunteer. Sadly, my name never made it to the top of the list after a year of waiting, so I took it off.

The interesting thing about San Diego history is that there are three organizations that seem to own every historical image of San Diego: Google Images, San Diego U-T, and the San Diego History Center. All three organizations make it prohibitively expensive to use one of their images, effectively shutting out little people like me who want to do Then & Now pictures. That’s the only reason why I don’t do more blog posts featuring then and now pictures. I have no desire to infringe on the copyrights of others, and my budget doesn’t allow me to buy permission nor does it have a slush fund for paying the penalty for using copyrighted images illegally.

San Diego Model Railroad Museum

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

Need a unique gift?
Visit Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos at Fine Art America.
photograhic art taking pictures making art

►►►►◄◄◄◄

Looking for real estate services in San Diego County?
I can highly recommend James Frimmer, Realtor, CDPE
CA BRE #0145857201 HomeSmartDiamondSmall copy 2

02 HomeSmartRWnameOnly2 copy

►►►►◄◄◄◄

If you’re looking for a home inspector,
I recommend Russel Ray — that’s me!

Real Estate Solutions by Russel Ray

SNIPPETS (7-10-14)

Snippets

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

snip-pet: a small piece of something

Snippets: mini blog posts

SNIPPET 1

My wise old grandmother subscribed to Saturday Evening Post when I was growing up. I always looked forward to getting it because the front cover often was artwork by Norman Rockwell. I freely admit that Norman Rockwell has an influence on my Photographic Art, and I think this would do Rockwell proud:

Starving artist in San Diego's Balboa Park

I love how the children are being children while the starving artist does his thing.

SNIPPET #2

The water lilies in the Lily Pond in front of the Botanical Building in Balboa Park are recovering from the $100,000 worth of damage wrought by a Facebook-advertised party in late 2012. Unfortunately, the criminals still have not been caught. Here’s what one looked like a couple of days ago:

Water liles in the Lily Pond in San Diego's Balboa Park

SNIPPET #3

The Museum of Natural History in Balboa Park has this piece of art on the exterior of the building:

Artwork at the Museum of Natural History in San Diego's Balboa Park

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

SNIPPET #4

Although the crepe myrtles are taking over the landscapes, there are still a few areas where the jacarandas are hanging on.

Jacaranda

SNIPPET #5

Pelicans are my favorite bird that I’ve actually seen out in their native habitat. This is a pink-backed pelican, but it is a resident of the San Diego Zoo Safari Park since this is not their native habitat.

Pink-backed pelican at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park

SNIPPET #6

Lantanas are one of the prettiest bushes in the San Diego area. They love it when it’s hot and dry.

Lantana

SNIPPET #7

The following picture is a white-breasted cormorant. It lives with the pink-backed pelican in the San Diego Zoo Safari Park. I really like this picture because of the gold on the back and wings.

White-breasted cormorant at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park

SNIPPET #8

The following is Photographic Art of a wild iris, a common plant here in San Diego that blooms year-round.

Wild iris

SNIPPET #9

I think I like the reflection of this Great Egret better than the Great Egret itself!

Great Egret

SNIPPET #10

I was testing the photographic capabilities of Facebook a couple of days ago to see how it treated huge, monster, gigantic, really really big pictures. Sadly, Facebook downsizes it to a useless low-resolution picture, which is kind of good if you don’t want people stealing your pictures.

Following is the picture that I used for my test. It is a photomerge of 16 pictures encompassing about 270° in the view, so it’s a panorama that cannot be captured with a birdseye or fisheye lens since they only capture about 180°. Click on the picture for a gigantic version with readable text.

270° panorama of San Diego, California

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

Need a unique gift?
Consider Photographic Art!photograhic art taking pictures making art

Visit Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos at Fine Art America.

►►►►◄◄◄◄

Looking for real estate services in San Diego County?
I can highly recommend James Frimmer, Realtor, CDPE
CA BRE #0145857201 HomeSmartDiamondSmall copy 2

02 HomeSmartRWnameOnly2 copy

►►►►◄◄◄◄

If you’re looking for a home inspector,
I recommend Russel Ray — that’s me!

Real Estate Solutions by Russel Ray

Monarch—Caterpillar to butterfly (WARNING: graphic content)

Did you know?

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

I have a love/hate relationship with technology. I love it when it brings new knowledge into my little head, like the Internet and new genome techniques. I hate it when it tries to control my life, like cell phones and cable television.

Yesterday at dawn, I went to Balboa Park to get some “golden hour” pictures for my San Diego Historical Landmark El Prado series.

At the two entrances to the Botanical Building are two large bushes. They always look rather scraggly, like this from yesterday:

Scraggly bush at the entrance to the Botanical Building in San Diego's Balboa Park

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

They look like overgrown weeds, so adults tend to pass right by them. Children (my friends say that I’m a 10-year-old child trapped in a
59-year-old body) notice very quickly that these bushes are unique. Throughout the year one can find these little critters all over the two bushes:

Monarch caterpillar

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Do you recognize that little one? Sure, it’s a caterpillar, but more importantly it’s the late stage (called an instar) of a monarch caterpillar. That little one is so big that it probably started pupating the moment I got my picture and left.

Here is a picture of one that is just beginning to pupate:

Pupating Monarch butterfly

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

If you see a caterpillar hanging upside down and curling up like that, take a look 24 hours later and you’ll probably see a chrysalis, also called a pupa. Looks like this:

Chrysalis of a Monarch butterfly

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Keep an eye on that chrysalis for the next two weeks and you might be lucky to see a monarch butterfly emerge.

Monarch out of bounds

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

(If you’re interested in creating the “out of bounds” effect like above, see my post here: https://russelrayphotos2.com/2013/10/22/how-to-create-the-out-of-bounds-effect-in-photoshop/ .)

Most people know that the Monarch caterpillar feeds only on milkweeds but that plant in the red circle in the first picture does not look like any milkweed I’ve ever seen. In fact, it’s not a milkweed. According to the little sign at the bottom of each bush is this:

Calotropis gigantea

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Sure enough, that’s not a milkweed.

Ah, but not so fast, grasshopper!

See what it says in the bottom left corner? Asclepiadaceae. That’s the subfamily. That’s where modern genetics and genetic coding (genome) comes into play. Except in the rarest of cases, we didn’t use to have subfamilies. This plant would have been noted as being in the Apocynaceae family, also known as dogbanes. Ah-ha! Guess what other plants are in the dogbane family? That’s right, boys and girls! Milkweed! Milkweed and this crown plant also are in the same Asclepiadaceae subfamily. That means they are very closely related, according to the folks decoding those genomes. That explains why the monarch butterfly loves this plant!

Although it is a scraggly bush, along with the monarch caterpillars, chrysalises, and butterflies, the flowers are very beautiful, albeit small and well camouflaged with the leaves. Flowers look like this:

Calotropis gigantea flowers

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

The Botanical Building, according to sources, is the most photographed building in San Diego, and when you’re casually traipsing through Balboa Park, you can’t possibly miss it. Looks like this:

Botanical Building in San Diego's Balboa Park

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Lastly, in the second picture, you might have had problems (like I did!) determining which end of the caterpillar is the front end and which end is the back end. After looking at a goodly number of the caterpillars, I determined that the back end has shorter antennae. Of course, the back end also is the end that poops. Here is a caterpillar checking out its poop:

Monarch caterpillar and its poop

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

If you don’t like using words like crap, poop, and the S word, frass is a term we use in the home inspection industry. Frass is an informal and loose definition usually used when referring to the poop of insects. Since it is a loose and informal definition, I give you permission to use it when referring to human poop, now also known as human frass.

As I was trying to find out which end was the front end, I came across an interesting 39-second video on YouTube that pretty much confirmed my thinking:

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Must be nice to be able to eat and poop at the same time! And on that note:

THE END

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

I'm Zoey the Cool Cat, and I approve this post

Need a unique gift?
Consider Photographic Art!photograhic art taking pictures making art

Visit Russel Ray Photos.

Visit Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos at Fine Art America.

►►►►◄◄◄◄

Looking for real estate services in San Diego County?
I can highly recommend James Frimmer, Realtor, CDPE
CA BRE #0145857201 HomeSmartDiamondSmall copy 2

02 HomeSmartRWnameOnly2 copy

►►►►◄◄◄◄

If you’re looking for a home inspector,
I recommend Russel Ray — that’s me!

Real Estate Solutions by Russel Ray