Video—Their water fountain is now MY water fountain

On September 30, 2017, I went to Julian, California, a historic gold-mining town in the mountains, for Apple Days. While I was there, I discovered all sorts of cool stuff and cool places. One of the cool places was The Warm Hearth, a huge store full of goodies to make your house into a home.

One of the items they had, which I fell in love with—and it’s difficult to fall in love with inanimate objects, but I did—was a water fountain. Jim and I had been looking for a fine fine fine water fountain at a reasonable cost, and this one was only $379. We headed to Julian yesterday for the sole purpose of getting the fountain.

Here it is in all its glory—flowing water, sound, and lights— on our deck. It will only stay on the deck for a few weeks until I get the landscaping in. It sounds a lot better than it did in The Warm Hearth because there aren’t a billion people walking around talking….

I'm Zoey the Cool Cat, and I approve this post

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Did You Know?—In the presence of mine enemies

Did you know?

The last Saturday in September is the Cabrillo Festival at Naval Base Point Loma here in San Diego. It actually is the Navy’s submarine base. Only one day a year can a member of the general public like me get onto the base.

It’s a historic area because it’s where Juan Rodrigues Cabrillo landed his Spanish galleon in 1542. Cabrillo was the first non-Native to visit what is now San Diego.

The 2017 Cabrillo Festival has been on my calendar for a year. I wasn’t about to miss the opportunity to walk around the base. Certain areas, of course, were still off limits. One of the first sites I saw was this marker:

Freedom Tree marker at Naval Base Point Loma in San Diego

THE FREEDOM TREE
WITH THE VISION OF UNIVERSAL FREEDOM
FOR ALL MANKIND
THIS TREE IS DEDICATED TO
CAPT. HOWARD RUTLEDGE
AND ALL
PRISONERS OF WAR
AND
MISSION IN ACTION
1978

Here’s the Freedom Tree:

Freedom Tree at Naval Base Point Loma in San Diego

Capt. Howard “Howie” Rutledge was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma, on November 13, 1928, and died of cancer in Norman, Oklahoma, on June 11, 1984.

He spent 7½ years as a prisoner of war in the “Hanoi Hilton” after his plane was shot down on November 28, 1965, over North Vietnam, and was released in 1973 as part of the general prisoner release. He later served as commanding officer at a naval air base in the Pacific and retired after 34 years in the Navy.

Rutledge co-wrote a book with his wife, “In the Presence of Mine Enemies,” detailing his time as a POW. Upon being published, it became the first book-length, firsthand account of the experiences of American prisoners of war in Vietnam.

For more on Capt. Rutledge, visit the Pow Network.

I'm Zoey the Cool Cat, and I approve this post

The food chain in action

My wise old grandmother

I guess as the ground squirrels and rabbits pass on the rumor that I’m a pretty nice guy, more wildlife seems to be visiting me. Yesterday a beautiful California Scrub Jay came to visit and drink.

California Scrub Jay

California Scrub Jay

Today, a Greater Roadrunner came to visit. Sadly, the roadrunner found a large Helix Snail that I had saved earlier in the day because it was trying to cross the asphalt street. I picked it up and brought it over to my side of the street. Just a couple of hours later, I watched the roadrunner find the snail, pick it up in its beak, bring it over to the concrete walkway, and bash that snail until the shell broke open, whence the snail became food for the roadrunner.

Greater Roadrunner

Greater Roadrunner

Greater Roadrunner

Reminds me of my wise old grandmother. When wildlife—spiders, lizards, flies—got into her house, she would catch them in a Mason jar and return them to the outside rather than summarily killing them for invading her house. Her reasoning was that they were a viable part of the food chain.

I'm Zoey the Cool Cat, and I approve this post

Music on Mondays (10/2/17)—The start of my favorites list

The Music Chronicles of Russel Ray

I’m into another rotation of my non-classical music collection, and this time I’m making a list of my favorite songs with the intention of eventually making a USB drive for my portable music player that will play all the time, wherever I am, when I’m not in the office or the car.

Following are the first five on my list, the only ones from before 1960.

“The Wayward Wind” by Gogi Grant, 1956—My youngest uncle was still living at home and going to college when my wise old grandmother adopted me. This was one of his favorite songs, and although we became estranged from each other in 1994, I still love this song.

“I Walk The Line” by Johnny Cash, 1956—I heard through the grapevine that I used to sit in the backseat of the car and sing along with Johnny Cash whenever this song came on the radio.

“Tom Dooley” by The Kingston Trio, 1958—This was one of my wise old grandmother’s favorite songs. She had it on a vinyl 45, which she gave to me in 1994 when she moved from her home of 57 years into an assisted living facility, called nursing homes back then.

“Soldier’s Joy” by Hawkshaw Hawkins, 1959—Each day I go through a couple of pages of Joel Whitburn’s “Top Pop Singles” book looking for songs that I like but for some reason missed. This is one such song that I discovered.
Interestingly, according to the Library of Congress, “Soldier’s Joy” is one of the oldest and most widely distributed tunes in the English-speaking world, showing up in sheet music on both sides of the Atlantic from the late eighteenth century.
Also interestingly, soldier’s joy can also refer to morphine, although morphine was not isolated until the early 1800’s. Of course, that doesn’t necessarily mean people didn’t know that they could get a natural high from poppie.

“The Battle of New Orleans” by Johnny Horton, 1959—I first heard this song in February 1974 at Mardi Gras in New Orleans. In the following months I discovered much more in the Johnny Horton catalog.

I'm Zoey the Cool Cat, and I approve this post

Out & About—Here, There & Everywhere

Out & About

Many readers who like my San Diego Historical Landmarks series might think that I have given up on them. Not so. I simply want to do them in order, and I got stuck at #15. Its name is “Conception,” and it’s on the United States Naval Submarine Base at Point Loma. In other words, it’s not accessible to the general public….

….Except for one day each year. Guess which day that is? Yep. Today. “Cabrillo Festival” day. So you know where I’ll be going later today, and I can resume my San Diego Historical Landmarks series. I have no idea what I’ll find there since I have not done any research on #15 year.

Meanwhile…. September has been a very active month for getting Out & About, and I’ll have blog posts on everything as the summer comes to a close and the cold, wet, fall and winter months arrive. To whet your appetite, here’s a sample of some of the places I’ve been.

We’ll start at home with Zoey the Cool Cat. I continue to take care of her every need—boxes, tummy rubs, food, clean litter box, food for the squirrels and rabbits so she can get her daily exercise running from window to window watching them, and what does she do? Turns her back on me.

Zoey the Cool Cat turns her back on me

September 3—Wildlife Corner at our new home

Rabbits & squirrels coexisting

September 9—Queen Califa’s Magical Circle in Kit Carson Park, Escondido

Queen Califa's Magical Circle in Kit Carson Park, Escondido

September 10—Surf Dog Surf-a-thon at Dog Beach in Del Mar

Surf Dog Surf-a-thon at Dog Beach in Del Mar

September 13—San Diego Zoo

Rattlesnake at the San Diego Zoo

September 15—Getting some kicks on Route 66 in Rancho Cucamonga

Overturned tanker on Route 66 in Rancho Cucamonga

September 16—Chili Cook Off & Classic Car Show in Alpine

Pirate Chili at the Chili Cook Off in Alpine

Classic car show in Alpine, California

September 18—Big Border Baby in Tecate

Border Wall baby

September 21—Watching trains in Colton

Union Pacific's West Colton Yard

September 22—MCAS Miramar Air Show in San Diego

MCAS Miramar Air Show in San Diego

September 23—San Diego Bonsai Show

San Diego Bonsai Show

September 23—Wavecrest Woody Meet at Moonlight Beach in Encinitas

Wavecrest Woody Meet at Moonlight Beach in Encinitas

September 24—Cuyamaca Rancho State Park near Julian

Deer in Cuyamaca Rancho State Park

September 24—Apple Days in historic Julian

Apple Days in Julian

September 24—Gold mine tours in Julian

Gold mine tour in Julian

September 24—Cool shopping in Julian at The Warm Hearth, The Birdwatcher, and the Julian Jewel Box

The Warm Hearth in Julian, California

Hummingbirds at The Birdwatcher in Julian

Julian Jewel Box in Julian

September 25—Newest visitor to our new home

Praying mantis in Winter Gardens

September 29—San Diego Quilt Show

San Diego Quilt Show

I'm Zoey the Cool Cat, and I approve this post

 

Out & About—The Warm Hearth in Julian, California

Out & About

About once a quarter I discover a store that is way beyond cool, so it’s unusual to find three cool stores on the same day within a block of each other. All three stores are in Julian, California, a mountain community founded around 1850. Gold was discovered in 1869. Perhaps Julian is best known now for its apple pies; I can highly recommend any pie by the Julian Pie Company. Julian’s Apple Days Festival, held last weekend, is why I was exploring Julian.

The first, and the largest, of the cool stores I found is The Warm Hearth. My wise old grandmother always told me that a house is just a house until you make it a home. So many goodies at The Warm Hearth that can help make my new house, or yours, into a home.

The Warm Hearth in Julian, California

The Warm Hearth in Julian, California

The Warm Hearth in Julian, California

The Warm Hearth in Julian, California

The Warm Hearth in Julian, California

Near the front entrance, and what immediately caught my eye, was a huge display of hot sauces, some of which I have never heard of. Considering that I have been hot saucing for 51 years, that’s quite unusual for me.

Hot sauces at The Warm Hearth in Julian, California

Hot sauces at The Warm Hearth in Julian, California

I stood there making mental notes of each hot sauce, and salivating. I know it’s not nice to salivate in public, but, oh well. What Hot Saucer could refrain from salivating over a hot sauce called Devil Drops, or Pain 100%? I don’t think anyone saw me….

Across from the hot sauces were all sorts of other sauces. Rattler BBQ Sauce piqued my interest.

Sauces at The Warm Hearth in Julian, California

Sauces at The Warm Hearth in Julian, California

As many of my readers know, when I find trains of any sort, I get kind of excited.

The Warm Hearth in Julian, California

The Warm Hearth in Julian, California

I have never had an appreciation for wine, not that I didn’t try when I turned 18 (would have to turn 21 in today’s world). The only wine I wound up liking is Zinfandel. However, I have a lot of friends who are wine connoissuers so whenever I find cool wine necessities, I think of them.

Wine necessities at The Warm Hearth in Julian, California

Wine necessities at The Warm Hearth in Julian, California

Wine necessities at The Warm Hearth in Julian, California

Wine necessities at The Warm Hearth in Julian, California

Wine necessities at The Warm Hearth in Julian, California

There were coffee and bacon necessities, too.

Coffee necessities at The Warm Hearth in Julian, California

Bacon necessities at The Warm Hearth in Julian, California

Many readers know about the dysfunctional family I grew up in, so this one really hit home with me:

Family tree roots at The Warm Hearth in Julian, California

My wise old grandmother had several interesting clocks in her home, including an old railroad depot clock and a grandfather’s clock. Clocks have always fascinated me, and at one time I had a huge collection of clocks. They got left behind in April 1993 when I escaped Texas.

Clocks at The Warm Hearth in Julian, California

When I was 10 and being bullied in sixth grade, my wise old grandmother counseled me with her wise words of wisdom: “Ten percent of the people will hate you because that’s the kind of people they are. Ten percent of the people will love you because that’s the kind of people they are. Eighty percent of the people will hate you or love you based on your actions and words. So be nice.” I thought of her words when I saw this:

Rules at The Warm Hearth in Julian, California

Of course, there still are witches (and warlocks), and there are good reasons to be one of them:

Reasons to be a witch at The Warm Hearth in Julian, California

An interesting assortment of books for the kids and cards for every occasion:

The Warm Hearth in Julian, California

The Warm Hearth in Julian, California

The Warm Hearth in Julian, California

There were gifts for our fine, furry, four-legged friends, too.

The Warm Hearth in Julian, California

Lots of other make-a-house-a-home stuff, too.

The Warm Hearth in Julian, California

The Warm Hearth in Julian, California

The Warm Hearth in Julian, California

I think I found my next water fountain at The Warm Hearth. Hopefully it will still be there when I return.

Chris is the owner of The Warm Hearth. He graciously gave me permission to take all these interior pictures for this blog post. Thank you, Chris.

I liked The Warm Hearth so much that I offered to let Chris adopt me and I would work at The Warm Hearth. Since I come with an endowment, he wouldn’t even have to pay me. Just consider it family child labor.

I'm Zoey the Cool Cat, and I approve this post