Category Archives: Out & About

Lost time (No, you can’t get it back)

Did you know?

People!
Get off your smartphones
and pay attention
to the traffic signal.
Be prepared for it to turn green
and stomp on the gas!
I don’t want to be honking my horn at you!

I was in La Jolla recently when I saw this sign:

Jean Lowe, Lost Time

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

The flyer is dated January 3, 1850, so I didn’t know what to think. Nonetheless, what it said, I found funny, and somewhat true:

LOST, ON MONDAY LAST

Either in the City of LOS ANGELES,
or thereabouts, a sum of Time, Con-
sisting principally of denominations
of Hours and Minutes – the whole
amounting to several Days. Whoever
may have found the same, and will
leave it, or give such information as
shall lead to its recovery, either to
the undersigned, Samuel Keller, Esq.,
or to the Messers. POST & WENT-
WORTH, Alameda Street; shall be
Liberally Rewarded.

January 3, 1850.     ARVIN M. DUNKLE

JEAN LOWE – LOST TIME

When I got home and looked at it more closely, I figured Jean Lowe was an author, her book, “Lost Time,” took place in January 1850, and the main character was Arvin Dunkle.

I went to Wikipedia first. No Jean Lowe. A Google search found her though.

She is an artist, quite an interesting one, too. I found a flyer from two years ago about an art exhibition at the McKenzie Fine Art gallery in New York City featuring her work, titled “Lost Time.” According to the flyer,

….Lowe has created humorous and subversive installations that question intellectual and cultural institutions and societal assumptions. …. Lowe slyly critiques the way society assigns value, and to what, through the creation of a faux auction house showroom. …. From fictional auction houses and websites such as “Roquefort’s,” “Heritage Holdovers,” and “PoliceAuctions.com,“ Lowe’s paintings illustrate items from sales which feature everything from fine watches, love letters, and important old master paintings, to manuscripts and ephemera.

Some of the lots featured in these sales are on display …. These include painted sculptures of an obsolete yellow pages phone book and a volume titled, “If God Loves Me, Why Do I Need a Vibrator?” Additionally, several of the items of faux ephemera are on view:  a 19th-century broadside offering a reward for lost minutes and hours.

In this exhibition, Lowe playfully transforms the banal into the magical and makes the rarified ridiculous by transforming commonplace items into desirable commodities, all in a satirical setting of high commerce.  Through her painted and sculptured recreations the artist humorously questions what is real, what is true, what has value, and why.

Did you catch the last sentence in the second paragraph? A-ha! Obviously her exhibit “Lost Time” made it to La Jolla sometime recently and that “broadside” was mass-produced to bring attention to it.

I love the arts.

But….

While I was searching for information on Madame Jean Lowe, I discovered that there really is such a thing as lost time.

According to Wikipedia,

Lost time is a traffic engineering term for the time during which no vehicles are able to pass through an intersection despite the traffic signal displaying a green (go) signal. The total lost time is the sum of start-up lost time and clearance lost time. Start-up lost time happens when a traffic signal changes from red (stop) to green (go). Some amount of time elapses between the signal changing from red to green and the first queued vehicle moving through the intersection. There is then an additional amount of time for the next vehicle to begin moving and pass through the intersection, and so on. The total time taken for all waiting drivers to react and accelerate is the start-up lost time. Clearance lost time is the time lost to stopping a line of vehicles at the end of a green phase. Lost time is always measured in seconds.

Clearance lost time often is not observable since some vehicles which were waiting at the start of a green phase still be waiting when the green phase ends

Perhaps a repeat is justified:

People! Get off your smartphones and pay attention to the traffic signal. Be prepared for it to turn green and stomp on the gas so all of us will lose less time! I don’t want to be honking my horn at you!

Photographic Art logo

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

My Christmas video for all y’all

Out & About

I went to Ocean Beach early on Christmas morning to get pictures and videos of 2015’s King Tide.

A “King Tide” coincides with a full moon and is the highest of the high tides for the year, excluding storm tides and tsunamis.

The King Tide for 2015 was about 7¼ feet.

While not nearly as exciting as storm tides, I got a nice video that includes several rainbows created by the ocean spray, smack dab in the middle of the video.

I didn’t see the rainbows until I got home and watched the video.

The area in the video normally is a wide, sandy beach full of people, even on cold winter days, “cold” being defined as temperatures below 60°F.

The area where I was standing normally is a dry bluff about twelve feet above the sandy beach, but just to get this Christmas video for all y’all, I stood in water and got significantly wet from the spray of the waves crashing a few feet from me.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

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Crazy, crazy people

Picture of the Moment

One of the highest high tides (a “king high tide”) in San Diego occurred this morning at 8:23 a.m., a whopping 7¼ feet.

Naturally I headed to Ocean Beach.

Ocean Beach neighborhood sign

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

The temperature was a very wintery 58°F and the wind was a blustery 33 mph.

Prior to November 2001, that would have felt like 40°F.

The post-November 2001 formula

wind chill formula

says that it felt like 52°.

(Global warming?)

I trust my bare, exposed ears, and they definitely tell me that it was more like 40°F.

There were people jogging in shorts and tank tops, playing football, walking their dogs….

….all just normal activities on a sunny summer day….

There were even photographers out taking pictures of the waves.

Ocean Beach waves

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Crazy, crazy people.

When it’s effectively 40° outside, you should be inside.

Wait…………

Nevermind.

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Fly your own bird of prey!

Out & About

There’s no doubt that having nice weather for about 335 days a year provides opportunities to enjoy the outdoors and all that Mother and Father Nature have to offer. In fact, even for those other  30 days each year, the weather can be so interesting that one is encouraged to go out then!

With so many days of nice weather, entrepreneurs have created companies with many interesting things to do that don’t involve sitting at a desk behind a computer or staring at a smart phone screen. One interesting thing to do that I discovered recently is flying your own bird of prey.

Sky Falconry

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

I discovered a group of people preparing to fly their own birds of prey recently, near the Torrey Pines Glider Port, all listening intently to the instructions on how to do this properly so that the raptors don’t bite your nose off or grab hold of your arm and take you for a sky ride….

Sky FalconryPictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Bucket List.

If you’re looking for something unique to do, contact Sky Falconry and book a Basic Falconry Lesson, a Hawk Walk, or a Photo Hawk Walk. These events are not inexpensive but I bet they provide once-in-a-lifetime memories.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

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Carmelite Monastery of San Diego

Out & About

As one drives (or rides the Trolley) through Mission Valley, one tends to notice the magnificent homes perched high up on the ridges, like these:

img_6232 mission valley homes stamp

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray PhotosOne of the homes looks to be even more magnificent than the others:

img_2881 carmelite monastery san diego stamp

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

That is the home of the Carmelite Monastery of San Diego.

According to their web site, the Carmelite Monastery is “daughters of St. Teresa of Avila who profess an allegiance to Jesus Christ by living a consecrated life of silent, solitary prayer in a small community of sisters….”

Carmelite Monastery of San DiegoPictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

The Carmelite Monastery of San Diego is of The Order of Our Lady of Mt. Carmel and is rooted in contemplative tradition. The nuns of the Carmelite Monastery are more properly known as Discalced Carmelites, meaning that they adhere to the Carmelite reformation begun ca. 1550 by St. Teresa of Avila.

The Carmelite tradition itself was founded in 1204 by a group of hermits who came together under the rule given them by St. Albert of Jerusalem. Eventually, due to “strife and unrest” in the Middle East (sound familiar?),  the hermits moved to Europe. The women’s branch of the Order began in 1452.

Four American women returning home from the Carmel of Hoogstraten founded first community of religious women in the thirteen original States. After establishing a Carmel at Port Tobacco in Maryland in 1790, the moved to Baltimore in 1830. A Carmel was founded in Boston in 1890, which founded the Carmel of Santa Clara (California) in 1906. From Santa Clara came the foundresses of the San Diego Carmel in 1926, headed by Mother Emmanuel of the Passion as the first Prioress.

The cornerstone of the church reads January 4, 1932 (in Roman numerals). It also has this inscription:

IN NOVINE
PATRIS ET FILII ET SPIRITUS SANCTI
DEO GRATIAS IN AETERNUM
J.D.P.

According to Google Translate, that is Latin, meaning “In newspapers, Father and Son and the Holy Spirit thank God for ever.”

The Carmelite Monastery of San Diego is located at 5158 Hawley Boulevard. It’s not easy to get to but is worth visiting if you have the time.

Carmelite Monastery of San Diego Carmelite Monastery of San Diego Carmelite Monastery of San Diego Carmelite Monastery of San Diego Bas relief at a San Diego monastery

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Need a unique gift for a Christmas or other special occasion?

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Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

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San Diego Historical Landmarks—#16: Whaling Station Site

San Diego Historical Landmarks

My plans to explore San Diego’s historical landmarks in numerical order came crashing down this morning when I realized that I could not get to San Diego Historical Landmark #16, Whaling Station Site, because it is smack dab in the heart of Naval Station Point Loma.

Whaling station site location

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

In other words, it is inaccessible to the general public. What! How can a historical site be inaccessible? Oh, the nerve….

The site is next to the San Diego Submarine Base, and if you take a boat tour of San Diego harbor you can sometimes get great pictures of submarines.

Submarine and tugboat

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

There’s a road, 209 on the map but Rosecrans on all the street signs, that goes through the middle of the naval base and Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery.

Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery is directly above the submarine base, so if you stop and walk to the edges of the cemetery, you can get good pictures of the submarine base and submarines currently in port.

San Diego submarine base

San Diego submarine base

Submarine base

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Continue on Rosecrans out to Cabrillo National Monument and enjoy the best views of Shelter Island, Harbor Island, North Island Naval Air Station, and downtown San Diego.

North Island Naval Air Station and downtown San Diego from Cabrillo National Monument in Point Loma

Shelter Island and submarine base

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

The Whaling Station Site is where shore whaling had its start in San Diego in the 1850s. Shore whaling involved shore sites where whalers cut up the whales they had taken in the harbor and at sea. The blubber was boiled down for oil, which was coopered and stored for shipment at the site. The San Diego whaling station produced as much as 55,000 gallons of whale oil annually.

Shortly after the United States Government took Ballast Point in 1869 for military, quarantine, and lighthouse purposes, the whaling station was forced to move.

I did find out that the Whaling Station Site is accessible one day each year, on October 14, when is when Cabrillo National Monument was founded.

I guess you know where I’m going on October 14, 2016….

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

For the introductory blog post to San Diego’s historical landmarks, click on San Diego’s Historical Landmarks.

For previous posts in the San Diego Historical Landmarks series, go here.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

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Testing for horsepower

Out & About

The first time I went to Houston was 1973 when I was 18. I was mesmerized by the freeways, especially the “spaghetti bowl” interchanges in and around downtown. When I moved to Houston in 1977, I often would drive out of my way just to drive the spaghetti bowls. Of course, that was back when gas was 59¢ a gallon….

Here in San Diego we don’t have a lot of great spaghetti bowl interchanges but one of my favorite is the interchange in Mission Valley where Interstate 8 passes under Interstate 805. It’s a huge interchange. Looks like this:

Interstate 805/Interstate 8 interchange in San Diego's Mission Valley

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

It’s possible to see Tokyo to the west and New York City to the east from the top of the 805…..

Going north is a long, steady climb, while going south is a steeper, shorter climb. Both sides make for a great test drive in a new car if you’re searching for horsepower….. Just sayin’.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Need a unique gift for a Christmas or other special occasion?

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Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos at Fine Art America

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Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

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