Category Archives: Flora

Picture of the Moment—Prehistoric creature hiding in flowers

Picture of the Moment

A macro lens allows you to see the prehistoric creature hiding in the flowers, about to nip your nose as you smell them.

Prehistoric creature hiding in the flowers

I'm Zoey the Cool Cat, and I approve this post

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Picture of the Moment—Human flowers

Picture of the Moment

I see lots of little faces with eyes wide open hiding behind hands that are giving me the middle finger. What do you see?

Flipping the finger

DISCLOSURE: I did tell them that they were pretty and that I would put them on Facebook….

I'm Zoey the Cool Cat, and I approve this post

Pictures of the Moment—Itty bitty teeny tiny little succulent flowers, mostly

Picture of the Moment

Taken with my Tamron 90mm Macro lens.

A string of itty bitty teeny tiny little succulent flowers
Teeny tiny flowers

Another itty bitty teeny tiny little succulent flower
Flower

More itty bitty teeny tiny little succulent flowers
Flowers

Oxalis
Oxalis

Honeybee on aloe flowers
Aloe flowers and honeybee

I'm Zoey the Cool Cat, and I approve this post

Did you know?—Ombrohydrochory

Did you know?

This is a little teeny tiny seed pod—about ¼” in diameter—of Glottiphyllum linguiforme taken with my Tamron 90mm Macro lens:

Glottiphyllum linguiforme seed pod

The seed pod releases its seeds via ombrohydrochory, a special form of hydrochory where the seeds are propelled by the action of rain falling on the plant.

Ombrohydrochory occurs primarily in very wet habitats and in very dry habitats and deserts where rain is sporadic but often heavy.

When the seed pod gets wet, it swells, shooting the seeds out like a jet leaving an aircraft carrier.

I'm Zoey the Cool Cat, and I approve this post

Picture of the Moment—Be a unique star!

Picture of the Moment

A picture of some teen tiny flowers on one of my succulents, a jade plant (Crassula ovata). Taken with a Tamron 90mm Macro lens.

How many stars can you count on just the one flower? I see 7 but I would not argue with you if you made a case for 8.

I would/could never have seen this without that cool macro lens.

Be more than a star. Be a unique star.

I'm Zoey the Cool Cat, and I approve this post

Did You Know?—Euphorbia, Datura & Brugmansia

Did you know?

When I was living with my wise old grandmother from 1965-1973, one of my “chores around the house” was pruning the billions and billions and billions of oleanders forming a fence around our property. I hated those things (which is why I have never had oleanders on any of my properties) because I was severely sensitive to oleander sap. I quickly learned to wear long-sleeve shirts, long pants, and gloves when pruning those blasted things. Hmmm. Deep south Texas and a teenager working outside with long shirts and long pants. Hated it.

Another plant that I am overly sensitive to is actually a plant genus: Euphorbia. Some of you might know that the common Christmas poinsettia is a Euphorbia, Euphorbia pulcherrima. Poinsettias grow year-round here in San Diego and can get about 20 feet tall, making a beautiful statement at Christmas time when they bloom.

Poinsettia

Another common plant around our homes is the “Crown of Thorns,” Euphorbia millii.

Crown of Thorns

My wise old grandmother also had poinsettias and crowns of thorns, both planted along the driveway. Well, guess where this tall, skinny dude had his basketball court? Inevitably a missed basket would result in the ball bouncing over to the poinsettias and crowns of thorns, and breaking branches, getting sticky sap all over my basketball. Poinsettias and crowns of thorns were also on my “Never in my own yard” list. Because poinsettias and crowns of thorns are succulents, though, I have had them in my home and on my property simply because I plant them out of the way and forget about them. They can survive on the water that Mother & Father Nature provide them, and since they are out of the way, I don’t have to prune them. The Crown of Thorns picture above is from one of my past gardens.

When I arrived in San Diego in April 1993 and started exploring, I found a plant that grows wild, is very beautiful, and has a heavenly scent, especially at dusk: Datura.

Datura

Datura

I never saw Datura in a nursery, though. Eventually I found out why. It is very poisonous, especially their flowers and seeds, and people like me can develop a severe skin rash when the milky white sap gets on our skin. Their common name is Devil’s Trumpet.

Related to Datura is a plant that IS found in nurseries although it is just as poisonous: Brugmansia.

The Brugmansia’s common name is Angel’s Trumpet. The Angel’s Trumpet in the picture above is from one of my past gardens. It bloomed year-round, so the scent outside the master bedroom window was out of this world. I think the window was always open at dusk to let the fragrance in.

Brugmansia’s are difficult to find in nurseries and are usually carried by the smaller mom-and-pop nurseries. I recently found a small yellow one that is now outside waiting for me to transfer it from nursery pot to the ground, although the longer it waits, the more I’m thinking about putting it in a large glazed pot.

A side story to Datura and Brugmansia is that if the flowers are boiled in water, they create a “tea” that, when drank, creates a “natural high”—delusional and hallucinogenic euphoria. Sadly, this natural high can paralyze the vocal chords; cause liver failure, dry mouth, blurred vision, and incontinence; and even cause death. About every five years or so, some high school students here in the San Diego area learn the hard way about getting a natural high from these two plants. Animals, especially dogs and cattle, also are affected negatively when they eat the plants.

I'm Zoey the Cool Cat, and I approve this post

Plants of the San Diego Zoo

San Diego Zoo logo

One of the meetup groups that I belong to is the Pacific Photographic Society with 2,248 members.

A perk of having that many members is that when we ask a company or its representative if we can have access to something, the answer rarely is no. Companies seem to be only too happy to let a bunch of photographers come in and take pictures of everything, even behind the scenes. Quite often we’ll be asked to provide our best pictures to the company, and sometimes those pictures get used in promotional brochures for the company, with photographer credit!

A disadvantage for me is that I have about $3,000 worth of equipment. That sounds like a lot but there are people in the group who have $30,000 worth of equipment. I can’t compete with them, nor do I want to. So I try to do things differently. When I go out with the group, I usually am the last person in line. I watch what the other people are taking pictures of, and then I take pictures of something different.

Such is the case each year when our last event is a visit to the San Diego Zoo. I have been going to the Zoo an average of once a week for many years, so I have billions and billions and billions of animal pictures. Since the San Diego Zoo also is an internationally recognized botanical garden, I also have billions and billions and billions of plant pictures. It’s the plants that people seem never to notice when they go to the Zoo, and since I love plants as much as the animals, I have an advantage there.

So, of course, at our Zoo visit on December 31, 2017, I took nothing but plant pictures. Well, I was promoted to group photographer since I was the only one with any kind of a wide-angle lens, mine being a Tamron 16-300mm zoom lens, so I got to take the group photo::

Pacific Photographic Society at the San Diego Zoo on December 31, 2017

I’ll share pictures of some of the animals from my two visits to the Zoo on the last two days of the year but meanwhile you’ll have to be satisfied with plant pictures. Of the following, the first two pictures are getting a lot of comments and “best picture” votes, and that was my intent, to show them that there is more to the Zoo than just the animals.

Which plant picture is your favorite?

1 – Teeny tiny mushroom forestMushrooms at the San Diego Zoo

2
Plant at the San Diego Zoo

3 – Cycad
Plant at the San Diego Zoo

4
Plant at the San Diego Zoo

5 – I think these are dates
Plant at the San Diego Zoo

6 – Aerial roots of a Ficus tree
Plant at the San Diego Zoo

7
Plant at the San Diego Zoo

8 – Philodendron branch
Plant at the San Diego Zoo

9 – Philodendron fruit
Plant at the San Diego Zoo

10
Plant at the San Diego Zoo

11 – Ficus tree
Plant at the San Diego Zoo

12
Plant at the San Diego Zoo

I'm Zoey the Cool Cat, and I approve this post