Category Archives: Did you know?

In memory of John Wear

Did you know?

I had a specific purpose in my life when I decided on April 30, 1993, to live in San Diego. That purpose was to live proudly as an openly gay man. I was 38. I wanted to experience anything and everything related to being gay. Many of my new friends said that I came out with a vengeance.

I often went places alone, like to gay bars at night. I was in Hillcrest, a heavily gay neighborhood of San Diego. I felt safe. Friends, though, continued to tell me to be aware.

Yesterday I took a guided tour of Hillcrest and its gay history. One of our stopping points was at the Hate Crime Memorial Plaque.

John Wear hate crimes plaque in Hillcrest, San Diego, California

THIS
HATE CRIME MEDICAL PLAQUE
IS DEDICATED IN MEMORY OF
17-YEAR OLD JOHN ROBERT WEAR
AND OTHER VICTIMS OF HATE CRIMES.

ON DECEMBER 13, 1991, THREE MEN BRUTALLY ATTACKED A GROUP
OF FRIENDS AS THEY WALKED DOWN UNIVERSITY AVENUE.
THIS INCIDENT WAS CONSIDERED A HATE CRIME BECAUSE THE
PERPETRATORS CALLED OUT “FAGGOTS” AS THEY PURSUED.
ONE OF THE YOUTH, JOHN WEAR, WAS FATALLY STABBED.

CITIZENS OF THIS COMMUNITY ARE DEDICATED TO ENDING
HATRED AND VIOLENCE ON OUR STREETS.

I vaguely recall stories about that incident but I was shocked reading the plaque on our tour. I found an article dated June 26, 1992, in the Los Angeles Times which I want to publish in its entirety here. I think it’s important.

Suspect Held in Hillcrest Attacks That Left One Dead : Crime: The fatal stabbing of a teen-ager in December galvanized gays and others in the community.

June 26, 1992, RICHARD CORE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES

An East San Diego man is being held in connection with three attacks in Hillcrest last December that culminated in the killing of a high school student and galvanized gays and others in the community in a continuing vigil against hate crimes.

San Diego police Thursday booked Eddie Barton, 25, on suspicion of murder and attempted murder in the Dec. 13 fatal stabbing of 17-year-old John Robert Wear and the beating of one of Wear’s two companions.

Barton was already in custody at the County Jail downtown after police arrested him Tuesday at his home in the 800 block of Carlsbad Street. He was arraigned Wednesday on two charges of battery for attacks that preceded the assault on Wear, homicide Lt. John Welter said.

All the attacks occurred within a few blocks of each other. Between 10:30 and 11 p.m. Dec. 13, a man walking in the 1700 block of University Avenue was punched in the face by at least one of two attackers. A few minutes later, another man walking in the 1000 block of University Avenue had his nose broken in an attack.

Ten minutes later, Wear, of Del Cerro, and two teen-age companions were attacked in the 1000 block of Essex Street as they walked from their car to Soho, a popular coffeehouse a block away on University Avenue.

“In all three attacks,” Welter said, “witnesses stated that the suspects were yelling epithets of homosexual nature at the victims.”

Witnesses also gave similar descriptions of two assailants involved in the attacks, saying they sported short-cropped hair, combat boots and flannel shirts.

Welter said police are hoping to identify the second suspect believed to have participated with Barton in the attacks.

Wear, a senior at Twain Junior-Senior High School, who was not gay, was stabbed in the chest and died a day later in Mercy Hospital after receiving 250 units of blood in an attempt to save his life. One of his two companions, Bryan Baird, then 18 and a senior at Patrick Henry High School, was cut in the face. The name of the third youth, who was not seriously hurt, was not released.

Gay and lesbian community leaders expressed cautious relief Thursday at the news of Barton’s arrest.

Anthony V. Zampella, publisher of Bravo!, a magazine geared to gays, urged the district attorney’s office to seek enhanced penalties against Barton under the state’s hate crimes law.

“It was definitely a hate crime,” Zampella said. “Until people are prosecuted for these types of crimes, there isn’t going to be an automatic deterrent.”

Steve Casey, a district attorney’s spokesman, said that, if a hate crimes enhancement is sought, it will be attached to the battery charges. The enhancement cannot be applied to murder charges, Casey said.

Wear’s death sparked an outcry from gay and lesbian groups and others in the Hillcrest community against a series of 30 attacks, mostly along University Avenue, that began last July. After Wear died, hundreds of people turned out for a candlelight march and an angry meeting with police.

Police responded by appointing a task force to investigate the crimes and more officers to patrol the area’s streets.

In one of the first efforts of its kind, organized by City Councilman John Hartley, police worked with residents to form a citizens patrol whose volunteer members began driving Hillcrest’s streets, watching for suspicious activity.

Although the task force was disbanded in February, with officers shifted to other duties in the city, the Citizens Patrol has remained. Through the efforts of gay groups and community newspapers, the patrol’s membership has risen to more than 100, with about 50 members regularly participating in patrols, said Wendy Sue, a member of the patrol’s steering committee.

Two-citizen teams armed with a cellular telephone now regularly drive the streets, reporting suspected crimes to police. The result, both police and community leaders say, has been a noticeable decrease in violent street crimes and a cautious feeling that Hillcrest is safer.

“In all honesty, the typical thing like that starts off strong with a lot of community support, and then people lose interest,” said police Sgt. Dennis Love, who oversees patrols in the area. “This, on the other hand, has started out strong and kept going.

“You’ve got some really involved people there who are interested in making their community a better place to be.”

Love said police have been so impressed by the Citizens Patrol that it is being used as a model for other communities concerned with fighting crime.

With the support of Wear’s parents, the Lesbian and Gay Men’s Community Center created the John Wear Memorial Award to honor people who perform outstanding service in the fight against hate crimes. Two weeks ago, the center presented the award to Hartley and the Citizens Patrol.

I wanted to know more about Eddie Barton, so I continued searching. Although not about Eddie Barton, the following article from the July 2001 issue of San Diego Magazine contains additional information about this attack.

Taking Back Neighborhoods

BY THOMAS SHESS 

The Cauldron

Citizens Patrol, one of the best tools to fight crime at the neighborhood level, was forged 10 years ago in San Diego’s Mid-City area amid a firestorm of public fear, frustration and outrage. Between June and December of 1991, the uptown communities, including Hillcrest, were in the grips of a chilling reign of hate. The almost-daily reports of gay-bashings and strong-arm street robberies were paralyzing a pedestrian-oriented community already staggering from the AIDS epidemic.

By mid-’91, police and the San Diego City Council were keenly aware of the war zone atmosphere in and around Hillcrest. In the District 3 council office that represents Hillcrest, the ears of those answering calls were burning from citizen demands that police stop the violence. By Thanksgiving, police had recorded more than 50 incidents.

The Catalyst

Of all the neighborhoods in San Diego, Hillcrest/Uptown stays awake the latest. Hillcrest in the wee hours is pedestrian-friendly, like many areas in San Francisco, Chicago, New Orleans, Manhattan. It’s not unusual for citizens here to be making the scene at midnight, café- and club-hopping. The heart of the gay and lesbian community, Hillcrest in 1991 was ripe for all manner of thugs prowling the neighborhood and targeting homosexuals.

December 13, 1991, was as good a night as any for two men in their mid-20s looking for such entertainment. It was Friday the 13th. Witnesses later reported the two had shaved heads and were wearing combat gear and military boots. One had s*k*i*n tattooed on the knuckles of a hand.

Also in Hillcrest that night was John Robert Wear, a 17-year-old high school senior from San Carlos. With buddies Bryan Baird and Jacob Isaacsen, Wear had parked in the 1000 block of Essex, a residential street south of busy University Avenue. They locked their car and proceeded on foot toward SoHo, a coffeehouse on University near Richmond, then popular with locals of every stripe. It was also a place for underage students to hang with an eclectic crowd.

The teens never made it to SoHo.

Witnesses later testified in court that the thugs, unprovoked, began taunting the boys and spewing anti-gay epithets. The name-calling turned ugly—and violent. Wear and Baird attempted to defend themselves as they were hammered by fists. Several kicks sent Wear to the sidewalk. Witnesses heard one of the assailants yell, “Stop whimpering, faggot.”

Assault turned to murder. One basher pulled a knife and stabbed Wear while he was down. Then he turned on Baird and struck a nonfatal blow to his head. Isaacsen ran for help.

Wear, who had hoped to join the Army the following [sic; missing text] was rushed to Mercy Hospital’s emergency unit, less than a mile away. Death was not immediate. Stab wounds take longer. Bleeding to death is a horrific death sentence, especially when compounded by a vicious beating. Wear’s father, John Sr., was at his son’s bedside when he died—in the same hospital where young John was born in 1976.

Baird survived his head wound. He and Isaacsen were key witnesses in two trials that saw the assailants convicted and sent to prison. Eddie Barton, the knifer—the one with s*k*i*n tattooed on his knuckles—is still serving a term of 20 years to life. He continues to deny he murdered anyone. Michael DiPaolo was convicted for his part in the crime. He served four years in prison before he was released.

Speaking at Barton’s trial, Wear’s father pointed at the convicted killer. “The stab wounds, the bruises, the boot marks from head to toe, overwhelmed me,” the father said, “This man’s an animal. The rest of his days should be spent in prison.”

I discovered that Eddie Barton was convicted of second degree murder, assault with a deadly weapon, and battery with serious injury, and is serving 20 years to life in prison. He is eligible for parole and has had several parole hearings. I found documentation from his 2008 Parole Board hearing where his parole was denied as the Board found him “unsuitable for release.” Most of the 10-page document from the United States District Court, Eastern District of California, is legal stuff relating to Eddie Barton’s Writ of Habeas Corpus. The Statement of Facts, however, is interesting, and I copy it in its entirety here:

The commitment offense occurred when Petitioner [Barton] and his coconspirators [sic] went to the Hillcrest area in San Diego, known to be frequented by homosexual, gay men. Petitioner and his friends were known as skinheads and set out to commit a hate crime, targeting gay males. On December 13, 1991, at approximately 11:15 p.m., the first victim, Keith Keziah, was walking toward the Hillcrest Coffee Shop when he was approached by Petitioner and his coconspirators [sic]. Petitioner asked him if he dated, and the victim ignored him and crossed the street to avoid a confrontation. Petitioner and his friends continued to harass Mr. Keziah, and they became angry. After not receiving a response, Petitioner grabbed Keziah by the shirt, swung him around, and punched him in the face, breaking his nose. Keziah ran away and sought assistance. Approximately 15 minutes later, Petitioner and his coconspirators [sic], approached victims, John Wear and Brian Baird who were walking to the same coffee shop. Mr. Baird greeted Petitioner and his friend and he was suddenly without provocation struck in the nose. Petitioner then began attacked Mr. Wear, and Baird saw Petitioner pull a knife from wear’s stomach. Petitioner then told Wear, “don’t cry, faggot” and started kicking him again. As Baird moved to help Wear, Petitioner turned and went towards him stating, “Do you want some? Do you want some?” Petitioner [sic; I think that should be Baird] then turned his back and crouched down stating, “No, I don’t want anything. I don’t even know you.” Petitioner then began hitting Baird in the head and kicking him in his back. Baird later discovered that Petitioner had cut his head, and Petitioner told him, “You better run.” John Wear died two days later as a result of the wounds to his abdomen. He also suffered wounds to the right thigh and a superficial wound to his left buttocks. Petitioner also suffered blunt force trauma, including bruises and abrasions to his right cheek, left ear, chest area, right forearm, and inside of both knees. Petitioner was arrested in part because he bragged that he had gotten into a fight with some homosexuals, and he stabbed one of them.

In memory of John Wear.

I'm Zoey the Cool Cat, and I approve this post

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My wise old grandmother always said, “It’s good to be familiar with things.”

Did you know?

Many decades ago I was a champion typist in the State of Texas, on both manual and electric typewriters. I had taught myself to type using a Gregg Typing book that I checked out from the Kingsville Public Library….

Gregg Typing manual

….and an 1896 Underwood typewriter that my granddad brought home from the Missouri Pacific Railroad shops that were closing.

Underwood typewriter

By the end of May 1966, I was typing 70 words per minute (WPM) on that Underwood. My goal had been 60 WPM because my wise old grandmother told me that 60 was what the best business typists were able to do.

I enjoyed typing so much that my wise old grandmother helped me set up my very first business for the Summer 1966, a typing business catering to students at Texas A&I University (now Texas A&M University—Kingsville). While my friends were out in the hot South Texas sun washing cars, pulling weeds, and mowing lawns, I was inside typing papers and make a lot more money than they were.

My little typing business made so much money from 1966 to 1973 when I graduated high school that I started collecting music, starting with The Beatles and The Who. By the time I went off to college, I had over one hundred albums and a couple hundred 45’s (smile and nod your head if you know what a 45 is).

When I got to tenth grade—high school in Kingsville; ninth grade still was in junior high—I signed up immediately for typing class in summer school because it was a required course and I wanted to get it out of the way since I already knew how to type.

I got to class and was immediately taken aside by the teacher, Miss Short, because of my last name. Turns out that the reputation of my dad and his three brothers preceded me, and she warned me against following in my family’s footsteps in her class. She wasn’t going to put up with me.

Our class had 30 students and 30 manual typewriters. However, the school had just received a brand new IBM Selectric, and Miss Short warned us against even touching that typewriter. Typing class during the summer was 3 hours long on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday with a 15-minute break halfway through. I sat there for the first 90 minutes bored as hell—

aaaa ssss dddd ffff
jjjj kkkk llll ;;;;

Bored, bored, bored.

During the break, I went over to the IBM Selectric, turned it on, put some paper in the roller, and started typing the lyrics to my favorite Beatles songs. Miss Short, who was out in the hall, heard the electric typewriter noise and thought that someone was simply holding down the keys and screwing with her priceless typewriter. When she saw what I had done, she admonished me and told me to stay after class. I figured I was getting kicked out of class.

Just the opposite. She admonished me again for touching the typewriter but then asked me if I wanted to do personal typing for her instead of sitting in typing class. Uh, okay….. Sure. Got an A+ in typing, my first A+ in high school.

For Christmas 1971, my wise old grandmother bought me a Smith Corona Coronet Electric typewriter.

Smith Corona Coronet electric typewriter

I was the happiest 17-year-old on Earth, or at least in Kingsville, Texas. I used that typewriter through Christmas 1974 but still had it and the Underwood through April 1993.

In 1976, on an IBM Selectric II, I typed 306 WPM over a 5-minute typing test with 6 errors. It was a very unofficial test, timed by a group of friends in the Student Programs Office of the Texas A&M Memorial Student Center. I never told anyone until now that I cheated; I had my own IBM Selectric II which I had bought myself for Christmas 1974, so I was extraordinarily familiar with it. My wise old grandmother always said, “It’s good to be familiar with things….”

I got my start in computers in June 1978 when I bought an Apple computer. I replaced the computer in May 1983, switching to IBM computers and keyboards. I have never looked back at my decision there, and I’m still an IBM/PC/Windows devotee.

For the longest time I had an IBM keyboard because of the tactile feel and audible click of the keys. It was the most comfortable keyboard to type on. Then mass-produced keyboards for home computers hit the mainstream and IBM eventually followed suit with the crappy computer keyboards. I eventually succumbed to carpal tunnel syndrome, now called repetitive stress injury. Pianists, organists, and fast typists particularly are subject to it.

In April 2003, I resorted to voice recognition using Dragon Naturally Speaking (DNS). Although I liked it, I enjoy listening to music when I work, and the music interfered with DNS. Thus, I went back to keyboard typing, but my typing speed continued to decrease and the number of errors increased. I was lost and depressed. Getting old sucks. JMHO.

Fast forward to May 2017. I had my business partner, one Joey Thaidigsman, a sophomore computer science major at the University of California at Berkeley (and with a 3.96 GPA!), build me a fine fine fine new super computer (named The Beast) to handle all my video and photo editing needs, leaving my old computer relegated to being 100% a music computer.

Once The Beast was up and running, I added a Sound Blaster X Katana sound bar to my music system and hooked it up to both computers so that I could also listen to music on The Beast. Once that was done, I decided I wanted a new keyboard. I was going to buy the best keyboard I could find.

That’s when I discovered gaming keyboards. IBM might have quit making their fine fine fine keyboards but that didn’t mean that the IBM feel and clickyness was gone forever. These gaming keyboards are also called mechanical keyboards because they have mechanical key switches rather than the rubber dome keys of mass-produced cheap keyboards.

I went to Fry’s Electronics and bought the most expensive mechanical keyboard they carried, a Razer Blackwidow Chroma. It didn’t work. After four hours with Razer tech support, it still didn’t work. They told me to return the keyboard as defective. However, they wanted me to return it directly to them and spent another 15 minutes getting me a Return Merchandise Authorization number. Unfortunately, the number woould be emailed to me within 24-48 hours. Huh? Email it to me NOW!

I disconnected, repacked the Razer, and took it back to Fry’s. Since Razer had lost me as a customer at that point, I chose the most expensive Corsair they carried. Took it home and couldn’t get the cool keyboard colors to work. Logged on to their web site, downloaded the most recent firmware, and the keyboard colors went crazy. It was like nothing I had ever experienced. After five minutes, I was dizzy and nauseated, and had accomplished absolutely nothing. I repacked the Corsair and took it back.

At this point I decided to look at non-gaming mechanical keyboards, of which the selection is about 10% of those available for gaming. I even got into trouble at Fry’s for opening every keyboard box in the mechanical non-gaming section and trying them out. After all my testing in the store, I came home with an Azio MK-Retro keyboard, a “typewriter inspired mechanical keyboard.” Looks just like that 1896 Underwood typewriter:

MK-Retro typewriter-inspired mechanical keyboard by Azio

The keys are not backlit like the gaming keyboards, and they are round, which might cause problems for people who grew up with the square-key computer keyboards. It has no extras, like macro programming, or gaming key programing, or USB ports, headphone jacks, etc. It’s just a quality mechanical keyboard.

The whole purpose of this typing dissertation, though, is to tell you something that has amazed me. My typing speed has increased and my typing errors are down. I think it has something to do with the tacticle feel and the audible clicks of the keys, letting you know exactly when you have pushed a key and created a corresponding graphic on the screen. It’s really cool.

So if you’re a touch typist, especially an elderly experienced touch typist like me, but you have noticed over the years that your speed has decreased and your errors have increased, I can highly recommend a mechanical keyboard. Especially if typing is a significant part of your livelihood as it is mine.

For price comparison, the cheap plastic/rubber keyboards were as low as $6.99 and as high as $39.99 at Fry’s. The non-gaming mechanical keyboards started at $49.99 and went as high as $129.99. The gaming mechanical keyboards started around $99.99 and went as high as $229.99.

Here’s my workplace now. Ignore the cat food. It’s not mine. Seriously, I don’t eat cat food….

Russel Ray's work place

The little queen, though…. well, my desk is her favorite place to eat, and if there’s no food when she jumps up on the desk, she’ll plop her butt in front of the computer monitor and sit there looking all abused and neglected, demanding to know why I don’t love her anymore….

Zoey the Cool Cat

My next purchase: A new desk. Jim and I just closed escrow on a new home, so we’ll be moving during the next 30 days, and this old desk will go straight to the trash with a new desk being delivered to the new digs.

This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

Monarch caterpillars are eating all the milkweed!

Did you know?

There are three sites in San Diego County where monarch butterflies overwinter, one in Grape Street Park in Balboa Park,  one in Presidio Park in Old Town San Diego State Historic Park, and one at the University of California San Diego Coast Site on Azul Street.

Surprisingly I have not been to any of them. Next winter….

Meanwhile, though, over at the Botanic Building in Balboa Park, there are two huge milkweed bushes at the entrances to the building. Monarchs, of course, love milkweed. On March 24, the bushes were full of monarch caterpillars, six just in this one picture:

Monarch butterfly caterpillars

By now those caterpillars probably have eaten every leaf on the plants and are nice and comfortable in their chrysalises. Here’s a fresh chrysalis from last year:

Chrysalis of a Monarch butterfly

As the chrysalises age, they turn brown.

Monarch caterpillar chrysalis, September 2011, San Diego

By Memorial Day the bushes will be full of monarch butterflies, flittering all about. Another picture from last year:

Monarch butterfly

Now, let’s learn how to tell the difference between a male monarch and a female.

Male monarchs have a black spot near the rear of each wing. Females don’t.

Here are two pictures to illustrate. The first picture is a male, the second a female. See the black spots on the male’s wings?

Monarch

Monarch

Thanks for stopping by! See you next time!

This post approved by
This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

A short history of (my) pets

Halls of History

I grew up with animals of every kind—ponies, donkeys, dogs, cats, a monkey, snakes, rats, skunks, opossums, raccoons, birds, mice, rats, fish, bugs. If it moved, it interested me.

I always considered myself a dog person, though, simply because my dogs would follow me around, roll over on command, sit, shake, and lie at my feet wherever I was. It was obvious that my dogs loved me. The other animals, no so much.

My first dog was a mutt named Bosco. I don’t have a picture of him. He was an alley dog, roaming wherever he wanted to go. One day he didn’t come home. I’m pretty sure he simply died; he was an old dog at that time.

I didn’t have another dog until I graduated from Texas A&M University and moved to Houston. I got two dogs, both purebred Beagles from the same litter. I named them “Union” and “Pacific” after the Union Pacific Railroad. Yes, I was weird even then. One day I came home from work and my apartment was open with fire, police, and apartment personnel rushing in an out. Union and Pacific had pooped in the bathtub (just like I had taught them to) but then had managed to turn the water on. The dog poop clogged the drain and the apartment flooded. I was upstairs, so water was leaking into the apartment below me and the roof in their unit collapsed. Fortunately everyone had insurance which covered us, but I either had to give up Union and Pacific, or move. I couldn’t afford to move at that point.

Finally, three years later, I did move. My Houston rent had gotten to a dollar a square foot, so I picked up and moved back to College Station where I was hoping to get a job with Texas A&M University so I could get that awesome state-supplied health insurance. I did. That was when I bought a duplex and got two dogs, Penney, a Long-haired Dachsund, and Sugar, a Chow Chow/Besenji mix. The only Chow Chow part of Sugar was her purple tongue.

Penney and Sugar

One day when I was preparing to leave on my motorcycle, Sugar jumped up on the seat. I took a few minutes and left her on the back seat and drove around the neighborhood fully expecting her to jump off and run home. Nope. She stayed. Happiest dog in the world.

Sugar the motorcycle riding dog

Since she was so happy, I took time out each day to take her for longer, and faster, motorcycle rides. Eventually she rode with me on the highway at 65 mph from College Station to Waco, a distance of about 90 miles. She was the best backseat rider ever, keeping her head pinned to my side and watching the road to determine which way she should lean into the upcoming curve.

On April 15, 1993, I left College Station on a suicide journey (see my unsuccessful suicide journey post here). I gave Sugar and Penney to a friend and never saw them again. I also lost contact with the friend, so I don’t know what happened to Sugar and Penney, or how long they lived.

From 1993 to 2007 I was too mobile and too into work to have a pet, although I did have several aquariums, even a 300-gallon aquarium full of African cichlids. Then, on Thanksgiving Day 2007, a black cat came to visit. Jim and I gave it food and water. It ate and drank, and left. Didn’t even bother saying “Thank you!” or “Goodbye!”

On Christmas Eve, it came back. Imagine that, a cat that knows human holidays!Sophie the Black Cat

Jim and I gave it food and water again, it ate and drank, and stayed. We named her Sophie.

We moved 8 months later and took her with us, all the while trying to make her into an indoor cat. Didn’t work. When darkness came, she would howl like a coyote until we let her out. She always came home, though, until the morning of September 20, 2007. No Sophie. A phone call at 7:30 a.m. No one calls me at 7:30 a.m. It was the worst phone call ever. A neighbor a couple of blocks over had found a black cat that had been hit and killed by a car. She had moved the cat out of the road, saw the collar tag, and called me. I went to retrieve the body and give it a proper burial, out near the house we had just sold, her old neighborhood.

Sophie grave

I was so devastated with the loss of Sophie, and how she died, that Jim and I immediately went to the El Cajon Animal Shelter to get another cat. We wanted an older cat that was an indoor cat, but I also wanted a cat that would let me hold it and pet it. We found Zoey, but she wouldn’t be ready to adopt until the next day. We were there 10 minutes before they opened, signed the adoption papers and paid the adoption fee, and brought Zoey home. Three hours after she arrived in our home, I captured this picture:

Zoey the Cool Cat

That was when I renamed Zoey, adding “the Cool Cat” so that she became Zoey the Cool Cat.

At first, having a 100% indoor cat was difficult. One of the reasons why I never considered myself a cat person was because cats like to jump up on things, climb on things, climb up things, and study gravy by knocking anything and everything to the floor. About the same time that I was getting really frustrated, a new show made its debut on cable: “My Cat From Hell” featuring Jackson Galaxy. I will admit that I judged a book by its cover and as soon as I saw Jackson, I said, “No way!” Yes way.

I learned from Jackson that cats are vertical animals. They like to climb. Once I was able to accept that and help Zoey the Cool Cat (ZCC), she and I became much better friends. I catified my house so that ZCC has vertical places she can go with no questions asked. I even have a special cat shelf in front of a window in each room. She loves them.

Zoey the Cool Cat on her window shelf

I also found out through Jackson Galaxy and “Pets Rule” at SeaWorld San Diego that you can train cats. I had never believed that. ZCC can go anywhere she wants except the top of the railing on the balcony (don’t want her falling off), the grand piano (just no), the leather sofa (don’t want cat claw holes in the leather), the kitchen counters (that’s where I prepare food), and the top of the refrigerator. Actually, she can go to the top of the refrigerator if she can figure out how to get there without making an intermediate stop on the kitchen counters.

Cats will react to a loud clap and a loud NO, usually by jumping down and hiding. Jackson taught me to wait about a minute and then give them a treat to let them know that I still love them, but it’s far enough away from the clap/NO so they won’t connect being bad with getting a treat.

Also, when you find cats somewhere you don’t want them to be, pick them up and put them someplace where it is okay to be, along with some loving words, a soothing voice, some petting or head butts, and a treat. You can get them to go where you want them to go by leaving treats there. Just don’t leave too many; otherwise, they’ll think that’s their eating spot.

Make it easy to get up and down. It’s more easy for cats to go up and not so easy for them to come down. I have catified my home so that it’s just short jumps from here to there, both up and down. In the window shelf picture, it’s a short jump up to my desk and then another short jump to get to her window shelf. She comes down the same way because they are short jumps. ZCC prefers those spots where she has to make a short jump. So, floor or bed? Bed. Floor or chair? Chair. Chair seat or chair back?

Zoey the Cool Cat

One thing it took me a little while to discover is that ZCC, and most cats, prefer the old and smelly to the new, so I never have spent money on a cat tree or cat toys. If I want to spice up ZCC’s life, a box or sack from the store is all she needs, and her favorite cat toy are the red rings from the gallon milk jugs. She’s easy.

Red Rings

Zoey the Cool Cat and her red ring

Zoey the Cool Cat and her red ring

Zoey the Cool Cat in her new sack

Thanks for stopping by! See you next time!

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This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

They still need to make the same amount of money

Did you know?

Humanity has known for several days—alright, several millenia—that water is necessary for survival. Then we learned how to save water for future needs, such as showers, cooking, brushing our little teethies. Then we learned how to transport it to areas that didn’t have much of it, like deserts, like, uh, Southern California, like Los Angeles and San Diego. The average rainfall for San Diego currently is 10.15 inches. Heck, I have been in many thunderstorms and hurricanes in Texas that dropped 10.15 inches of rain in 24 hours!

I’m not a big fan of rain, but I am a big fan of water since I like to take showers, cook, and brush my little teethies, not to mention garden. We know that because of the Mediterranean climate that San Diego has, all we need to do is provide water and virtually anything will grow here. There even are two redwood forests here in San Diego County—one at the San Diego Zoo and one at Safari Park—which survive simply because they get the water they need.

Although there are lakes in San Diego County, there is not a single man-made lake. All of them are artificial lakes, also known as reservoirs. Here is a picture of the Sweetwater Reservoir on April 3, 2010:

Sweetwater Reservoir near San Diego, April 3, 2010

On November 12, 2008, it was announced that capacity was down to 23%, the “lowest level in years.”
February 10, 2013, it was 48.7%.
March 2, 2015, 13%.
January 19, 2017, 12%.
February 9, 2017, 20.4%. So the very wet January has helped tremendously.

California Governor Jerry Brown declared a state of emergency in 2014 due to the drought, directing water agencies to cut urban water use by 25% of 2013 levels. Good thing I cooperated by taking just one shower a week (not really). The public was so good at cutting water use that the water agencies raised our rates. After all, they still need to make the same amount of money, or more, yes?

San Diego has declared that the drought here is over because of the rain we have gotten, the snowpack in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, and the level of the Colorado River. San Diego gets 60% of its water from the Colorado River, 20% from the snowpack, and 20% from its local reservoirs.

The water coming to San Diego from the Colorado River comes via the San Diego Aquaduct, a series of pipelines and canals stretching 225 miles. The water coming from the Sierra Nevada snowpack comes via the California Aqueduct. When I was chasing trains on February 5, I was going over one of our Southern California concrete rivers when I noticed that it was 100% full, almost overflowing. Then I saw a sign telling me that it was the California Aquaduct, so I kept my eye on it and turned off the freeway and the next safe area to take this picture:

California Aqueduct

Now I have to get out and about to see if I can get some pictures of the San Diego Aquaduct.

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Mother & Father Nature are not dumb

Did you know?

Shortly after I arrived in San Diego on April 27, 1993, one of the weekly tabloids ran an exposé on rivers in San Diego and Los Angeles counties. It noted that San Diego was in the process of “Los Angelesizing” its rivers. “Los Angelesizing” means that the river bed was being cleaned of soil and vegetation, and being replaced with concrete. At one point every river in the city of Los Angeles, and many in Los Angeles County, had been Los Angelesized. Here is a picture of one concrete river that I took in Los Angeles County on April 13, 2014.

Los Angeles concrete river

The theory was that soil and vegetation caused the water to slow down and build up, thus being more likely to cause flooding. We thought we knew more than Mother & Father Nature did. Turns out that Mother & Father Nature are quite smart.

When the water flows more slowly, it has a better chance of being soaked up by the soil and the vegetation. When there is nothing to slow it down, it speeds right along until it hits an obstruction, like a curve in the river, or bridge abutments, and that’s where the water piles up and floods. With more water continuing to rush in, the flooding gets worse.

Now that we know the purpose of soil and vegetation, concrete is being removed from the channels, returning them to being rivers full of soil and vegetation, returning them to their formerly natural beauty.

A few days ago I was up in Los Angeles County and saw the Santa Ana River being returned to Mother & Father Nature. In the first two pictures you can see the concrete river bed.

Concrete river bed

Concrete river bed

You can see that the concrete at the right actually was removed. That’s because there is a bridge downstream about 500 feet, so instead of just letting the concrete deteriorate and silt over, they actually removed it, allowing the vegetation to come back more quickly and the soil to absorb the water, slowing it down. Here’s the downstream bridge:

Bridge over the Santa Ana River

Notice the silt and vegetation. If you have ever stuck a branch into a flowing stream, you might remember how the water rushed around the branch. Same thing when flowing water hits a bridge abutment, so you want to slow down the water as much as possible. Soil and vegetation do that.

Unfortunately, many decades ago people didn’t seem to understand that concept, so in some places where they needed to slow down the water, they put in mini-abutments, as in this picture:

Concrete river bed

That might have worked if they had staggered the mini-abutments. Instead, they lined them up perfectly and spaced the rows out evenly so that the water increased in speed each time it rushed around another min-abutment. Mother & Father Nature are not dumb.

I’m not sure when they decided to let this river return to its natural state but I’d sure like to visit it in 50 years to see how Mother & Father Nature have progressed. If I make it another 50 years to age 111, somehow I suspect that I won’t be out & about with my camera…..

Santa Ana River returning to nature

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Goat Canyon Trestle

Out & About—I’m thinking heat exhaustion

Out & About

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Yesterday I took a 2½-hour helicopter tour of East San Diego County. My specific purpose was to visit Carrizo Gorge to see this baby:

Goat Canyon Trestle

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

That’s the Goat Canyon Trestle, built in 1932 by the San Diego & Arizona Railway. It is 630 feet long and 180 feet high, and is the largest wooden railroad trestle in the world. It was built to take the place of a smaller trestle and tunnel that had collapsed in an earthquake. You can see the tunnel entrance just above the center of the Goat Canyon Trestle.

The San Diego & Arizona Railway is known as “The Impossible Railroad” because of the environment through which it was built—rocky mountains, deep canyons, no water, and temperatures regularly reaching 120°F.

Workers lived where they worked, and regularly reported glowing orbs floating around the construction area at night. There also were many reports of Bigfoot-like creatures roaming the Anza-Borrego Desert, eventually becoming known as the Borrego Springs Sandmen.

In 1977, an engineer thought he saw a bright light ahead of his train, meaning that another train was heading towards his train, so he pulled the brake, derailing his train. Of course, there was no other train.

Wrecked railroad cars

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Floating orbs? Sandmen? Trains heading the wrong direction? 120°F? No water? I’m thinking heat exhaustion….

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

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