SNIPPETS (4-29-18)

Snippets

SNIPPET 1

I honestly admit that it has been a long time since I have been as passionate about something—anything!—as I am about my newfound interest in cactus & succulents (C&S), my role as newsletter editor for the San Diego Cactus & Succulent Society, and my new company, A+R POTTERY.

In order to sell anything at C&S shows throughout Southern California, including my Designer Pots by A+R POTTERY, one has to be a member of that specific C&S society.

Yesterday I visited the Palomar C&S Society in Escondido, 31 miles north of me, which I joined last month. San Diego C&S Society will be my home chapter, and Palomar C&S Society will be my secondary chapter.

Most chapters have what they call a “Brag Table” at their meetings where members can bring in plants and kind of (kind of?) brag about them in front of other similar-minded (i.e., obsessive about cactus & succulents) people.

There usually are three experience levels: Novice, Intermediate, and Advanced. One’s rating is determined by how many ribbons one has won at their meetings and shows, not how much one knows about cactus and succulents, or how long one has been growing them.

There are two main categories: Cactus, and Succulents.

Even though I’ve been growing cactus and succulents since 1966, I’m a Novice as to showing them in competitions. I entered five plants in the Palomar C&S Society Brag Table competition yesterday and came away with a 1st place cactus and a clean sweep—1st, 2nd, and 3rd—in succulents.

They announced that it was their largest meeting ever with 92 members in attendance, and I counted 37 entries in the succulent category, so I wasn’t just competing against myself………..lol

All are in Designer Pots by A+R POTTERY (that’s me!), and the 1st place cactus also won 1st place cactus at the San Diego C&S Society Brag Table competition on April 14. Here they are:

1st place cactus Mammilaria plumosa pcss 042818 framed

1st place succulent Aloe castilloniae pcss

2nd place succulent Crassula corymbulosa

3rd place succulent Crassula

And here’s the loser, an Echevieria ‘Dondo’ in a cute glass pot on a framed San Diego tile:

Echeveriera 'Dondo' on a San Diego framed tile

SNIPPET 2

Did I say something about being passionate?

The San Diego County Fair, the nation’s fifth largest by attendance, begins June 1 and ends July 4, making it the Fair’s longest run ever. Each year they have a huge gardening section with bonsai, cactus & succulents, landscaping, and more. That’s the main reason I go to the Fair each year. This year, however, I shall be entering two plants in the “Container” competition. These two:

1st place succulent Aloe castilloniae pcss

Euphorbia ferox

The second picture is a Euphorbia ferox in what I call my “Stephen King” pot since it looks like a devilish creature out of one of his novels. That pot sold (to me!) for $100 at the San Diego Cactus & Succulent Society Winter Show, and is the pot that is directly attributable to me founding my A+R POTTERY company.

I might also enter some more plants but the Fair’s criteria for judging actually does include artistic creativeness and originality, so it depends on how original and creative I can get by May 4, which is the deadline for entering Container plants.

SNIPPET 3

I’m thinking that the problem with home schooling is that the children get no interaction with other children who, uh, might not be exactly like them. All they get is what mommy and daddy want them to get, and that includes religious indoctrination and hatred of others who are different. I think education includes—or should include—much more than simply Reading, ‘Riting, & ‘Rithmatic. It needs to include socialization with other people, music appreciation, sports (learning how to lose graciously), history (My wise old grandmother said, “If we don’t study and understand history, we are bound to repeat it.” That could explain why it seems like America is back in the 1850’s instead of 2018.

SNIPPET 4

I spent several hours on Friday looking at the ground planting cacti, succulents, and rocks. It was late evening, so I took a break, looked up, and saw this:

Sunset in El Cajon, California

I didn’t have my DSLR out in the dirt with me so I had to take that with my Samsung Galaxy S8 smarty-pants phone.

SNIPPET 5

Back in 1987 I dated a woman who asked God everything, when to call in sick, when to take vacation, when to do genealogy research, when to call me, when to come visit me.

I had a home-based business and one Saturday night she was in my bedroom studying her Bible lesson for Sunday. I decided to take a break and take the two dogs for a walk. I went into my room and asked her, “Do you want to take the dogs for a walk with me?” She rolled over, looked at me ever so sweetly, and answered, “No. God hasn’t told me to take the dogs for a walk with you.”

I broke up with her two days later.

That was the beginning of the end of any respect I had for religion.

If God was talking in such detail with that one woman, I thought s/he was neglecting a few billion other people, like children dying of cancer or other such diseases (leprosy, smallpox, etc., in the days of yore), family and friends of children dying of cancer. Then, just for fun, add in deaths and injuries from tornadoes, hurricanes, heat waves, blizzards, floods.

Death and destruction everywhere. If that’s God, I don’t want anything to do with it.

I'm Zoey the Cool Cat, and I approve this post

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21 thoughts on “SNIPPETS (4-29-18)

  1. Sue W-Nan's Farm

    I thoroughly enjoy reading your snippets Russel. I agree with you totally on Snippet three. Home schooling doesn’t provide a well rounded education or create a rounded and grounded individual. The social aspect is important, children learn from each other, learn how to play, to share, to care and how to formulate their own opinions and ideas, and as you so rightly pointed out, not simply clones of their parents.

    Liked by 1 person

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    1. Russel Ray Photos Post author

      I have one friend in Houston who home schools his three children but they are forced to get involved in community events–soccer, baseball, football, band, etc. His children are great.z

      I have another friend in Minneapolis who home schools her children and shields them from the world so they don’t learn anything she disagrees with. Her children are jerks, in every sense of the word.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  2. Susan Taylor Brand

    Wow I am amazed by your succulents. But … the comment that interested me was the “one of these things is not like the others … ” the comment on home schoolers. I home schooled for years then became a regular classroom teacher. And after nine years of school teaching, I have to say, though our home schooling days were thought of by myself and my daughters as some of our happiest, and our homeschool was highly effective (both daughters went on to advanced college degrees, I think that shows something “took,”) some home schooling seems to me … to miss the point. I our home school we were trying to explore and learn about the world, not shut the door on it. I am shocked at those who want to home school to stay away from, not the “great unwashed,” but their own next door neighbors.

    Liked by 1 person

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  3. Baydreamer

    What a great snippet-packed post, Russell! I love all your plants and congrats on your winnings. Good luck on the fair submissions this summer, too. I’m doing the same with some writing – our fair is 6/30-7/4. I’ve missed a few years, so it’s kind of fun for a change.
    My children went to public school (a good p.s.), so I don’t have homeschooling experience, but I agree with you as an outsider. Kids especially in this tech world need face-to-face, and they won’t get it being home schooled, unless they’re involved in other extra curricular activities.
    By the way, your losing plant is just as beautiful, and all the places you mention down there, bring back memories of my southern Cal. days. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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