Our birds deserve better

I livew in my own little world

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

When I was but a juvenile delinquent of the age of 8 living in Brigham City, Utah, I skipped second grade one day and went with a friend to see Alfred Hitchcock’s movie “The Birds.” I already had developed a fascination with birds and couldn’t understand why my mom and (step)dad wouldn’t let me go see the movie. This, of course, was prior to films being rated, so it was up to parents to decide what their children could watch. Even though I still was young, impressionable, and brainwashable, the movie did not dampen my love of birds.

I am fortunate to live in San Diego because of the San Diego Zoo and the Zoo’s Safari Park. I have seen birds that I never would have had the opportunity to see if I relied on seeing them in the wild, birds like flamingos, shoebills, and various species of eagles, owls, condors, and vultures.

Necking flamingos at the San Diego ZooNecking flamingos at San Diego Zoo

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Shoebill at the San Diego Zoo's Safari ParkShoebill at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Milky Eagle Owl

Milky eagle owl at the San Diego Zoo

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

I also am fortunate to live in a coastal area like San Diego because there are over 500 species of birds that can be seen here on a regular basis, some of those stopping by while migrating on the Pacific Flyway.

Possibly my five favorite birds that can be seen on a daily basis roaming around the outdoors are pelicans, great egrets, snowy egrets, great blue herons, and black-crowned night herons.

Snowy egretsSnowy egrets at play at Santee Lakes

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Pelicans at La Jolla Cove in La Jolla, California, north of San Diego.Brown pelicans enjoying the view in La Jolla

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Great Blue Heron with mealGreat blue heron with morning meal at Mission Bay Park

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

black-crowned-night-heron-4-one-leg

One-legged black-crowned night heron hanging out at SeaWorld where food is plentiful.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

When I first saw that black-crowned night heron I thought it was just standing on one leg, but herons don’t typically do that; they are not flamingos. That’s when I noticed that it really did only have one leg. Sadly, birds with just one foot or one leg are common here in San Diego because of all the fishing. They get a foot or leg tangled up in the fishing line which cuts off the circulation and eventually the bird loses that foot or leg. Here is a brown pelican with a missing foot probably due to fishing line entanglement:

Pelican with one foot

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

If you’re a fisherperson, please dispose of your fishing line properly. All docks have disposal bins with lids on them so that our precious wildlife can’t get tangled up.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

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3 thoughts on “Our birds deserve better

  1. Colltales

    So sad, Russel, and well documented. I hate to say this but humans’ damaging actions toward nature and the animals, even when not intended, never ceased to shock me for their cruelty. Cheers

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  2. acflory

    I was going to make a funny remark about the Hitchcock movie leading to your love of /cats/…but then I saw the last few photos and the joke didn’t seem funny any more. Great photos though. 🙂

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