Is there enough room?

Picture of the Moment

Quite often when I’m out and about I’ll find something of beauty that seems to be ruined by the reality around it.

Something like this:

Pizza box

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray PhotosOr this:

Shoe in a stream

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

I don’t know anyone who condones trash and litter, but sometimes that trash and litter makes one stop and think about the world around us and what’s happening.

img_0067 mural trash ocean beach 2 stamp

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Such a juxtaposition in that picture.

So what do we do with the trash that results from the activities of 7½ billion people? Is there enough room on Earth for all those people and all their trash?

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Need a unique gift?
Anniversary? Birthday? Graduation? Marriage?
Choose Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos at Fine Art America.

Photographic Art logo

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

I'm Zoey the Cool Cat, and I approve this post

Advertisements

23 thoughts on “Is there enough room?

  1. Chas Spain

    Hi Russell There’s something Bankie-ish about the top image – it seems to be such a ridiculous state that we can’t respect our environment. I think the answer to your question about whether the world can cope with all of us plus all our rubbish is no. What we do about it is another really hard question.

    Liked by 3 people

    Reply
    1. Russel Ray Photos Post author

      Our two major landfills here are in areas that I drive by quite often. Each time I do I wonder if scientists anywhere are working on ways to get rid of our trash without digging a big hole in the ground, filling it up, and covering it over. I’d love to be a time traveler and visit the Earth a thousand years from now to see what archaeologists are finding out about us……..

      Liked by 2 people

      Reply
      1. Chas Spain

        Hi Russell There is a conference coming up on the Anthropocene which is basically a proposed name for the period the (industrialised?) human race has set about creating a geological layer of garbage + made other impacts on the planet. This age too will pass I suppose and, yes I agree, whoever or whatever comes after to dig it up will find us a puzzling but extinct species I’m sure.

        Liked by 1 person

        Reply
    2. songtothesirens

      I completely agree that the environment as we are currently treating it is not going to be able to sustain society as a whole. What to do about it, as you made the point, is definitely a difficult question.

      What baffles me is that the science is there to make the environment more sustainable, but large companies and questionable projects (i.e. the Keystone pipeline) complain it is too expensive to use sustainable anything. I live in a state where the sun shines 2/3 of the year, and the wind can blow for days (really annoying), yet our energy companies do not see these assets as potential. They simply request rate hikes in order to build more non-sustainable sources of energy, and reply to those who ask why they do not take advantage of the sun and the wind that it is too expensive to make the necessary changes or build the necessary structures.

      Our electric company recently asked for a 12% rate hike (which was not approved by the Regulatory Committee) in order to maintain and build more sources of non-sustainable energy. When queried about the rate hike and why the company does not build more solar and wind driven sources of electricity, they say it is too expensive. What, then, are they going to do with the 12% increase? It is a difficult question to be sure. Especially when the utility companies could use the increase to build more sustainable energy sources. If the resources are there, why not use them. The sun and the wind do not pollute the air.

      Liked by 2 people

      Reply
      1. Russel Ray Photos Post author

        “What, then, are they going to do with the 12% increase?”
        Why, raises and bonuses for their top management, and returns to shareholders. I can’t believe you even needed to ask that question!……….LOL

        Liked by 1 person

        Reply
      2. Chas Spain

        The more I read and the more I see the more I realise we are being sold the biggest load of nonsense about renewable energy by big companies with vested interest in fossil fuels. For the first time Australia’s fossil fuel consumption has started to drop – against the predicted trend – as more people switch to solar. The (conservative) government has now ripped out all incentives for renewables to protect their mining mates. Could go on and on, but I mustn’t impose on Russell’s site!

        Liked by 1 person

        Reply
        1. Russel Ray Photos Post author

          Ha! I love it when people impose on my site!

          I think there will come a point where solar will become a viable alternative to fossil fuels. I say that because here in San Diego, houses built in many new subdivisions must have solar panels on their roofs (rooves?). Because solar panels are ugly, even uglier than the roofs themselves, that requirement is resulting in some new ideas on how to make the solar panels less ugly. In the process of that happening, solar is becoming more efficient, less expensive, and smaller!

          Like

          Reply
  2. songtothesirens

    I find that as I travel around my city by foot, bus and bicycle, the trash and liter that I see on the ground tells a story of the people that were in that spot before I arrived. Who was the person that left the pint bottle of cheap vodka on the ground and not in the trash can 3 feet away, who left their “tag” all over the posted bus schedule rendering it unreadable, and why do they feel so alone and ignored that they have to leave their “mark” all over? I see so much more because I am not racing around in a car, running late, and speeding through the day.

    I have always wondered what archaeologists are going to think of our society when it has evolved into something new and different than what we know. You can learn a lot about those that went before by what they leave behind.

    I think there are a couple of states that have turned their landfills into parks for people, refuges for wildlife and the like. I don’t know if that counts as covering the hole in the earth or not, but for now, it seems a viable idea.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Russel Ray Photos Post author

      One of the largest landfills here is across the highway from Kaiser Permanente’s hospital. As I was sitting in the lounge, I got up and went to a window to watch truck after truck after truck arrive to dump tons of trash. A doctor came by and stopped by me, looked out the window, and commented, “That will be full in two years and then they will start building something on it, houses, park, stores. Fifty years from now everyone living and working there will have some form of cancer.”

      I couldn’t find anything via Google that indicated that landfills are a cause of cancer, but the fact that a doctor said that made me pause.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  3. insearchofitall

    This is a big conversation. When my daughter moved to Oregon 8 years ago, she moved into a cheap apartment. When my last husband and I came for a visit, the first words out of his mouth was “I smell methane” We checked with an environmental lawyer friend and yes, the complex had been built on a landfill. It took a year and me helping to pay the rent to get her out of there. A blogging friend works tirelessly to make us aware of how much trash we generate and how to cut back. But to leave it on the street is just plain lazy and feeling entitled. It distracts from the beauty of this wonderful planet.

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
  4. Darlene Jones

    The management of the building where we live is committed to reducing landfill and did so by 46% last year. Their goal this year is 62%. They are a big company so will have an impact on our city and that’s a start, but … Reading about the Texas size waste pile floating in the Pacific and other such stories, I think we’re beyond hope.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  5. philosophermouseofthehedge

    What we had was bad enough. Now all these junked computers/electronic devices, large toxic batteries. Industry doesn’t want to talk about what will happen to electric car batteries…almost to the point of saying that a company must show how defective or worn out parts will be recycled/repurposed/disposed of before a new product is released to the market.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

Let your words flow

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s