Plants for your home that are easy to grow

House & Home

When I was growing up in Brigham City, Utah—before my wise old grandmother adopted me—my first grade teacher, Mrs. Larsen, lived next door. She had beautiful gardens full of tulips, daffodils, and nasturtiums. One day when I was sick, I went over to her yard and destroyed most of her gardens. This was when I was in third grade, though. Since I was always visiting her gardens, she was pretty sure who had done the damage. I’m pretty sure I paid for my transgression but I really don’t remember the punishment. What I do remember is how Mrs. Larsen handled the situation. She never held it against me, maybe figuring that I was still a child. She even invited me to help her replant her gardens, and my mom approved, figuring it was only appropriate. That was the beginning of my love for Mother & Father Nature, plants and gardening, and nice people. My wise old grandmother continued instilling in me that kind of love.

I often get asked about the plants in my own garden, especially plants in my home. I admit that I do have a green thumb. In this post, then, I want to present to you several plants that do extremely well in our homes, where the humidity is lacking and the air can be overly cool in the summer or overly hot in the winter.

First is the Sansevieria, many of which are simply labeled as “mother-in-law’s tongue” or “snake plant” at the stores. They come in both tall and dwarf varieties:

Sansevieria hyacinthoides

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Sansevieria

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Sansevieria

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

The tall varieties make excellent corner plants or accent plants. The dwarf varieties make great table or counter plants.

The spider plant—also known as airplane plant—Chlorophytum comosum, also is extremely easy to grow, and it has the advantage of giving you billions and billions and billions of baby plants. Just pick the airplane plant at the tip of the shoots off of the plant and lay it on top of some soil. It will develop roots and start growing. Makes a great hanging basket, inside or out, sun or shade, moist or dry.

Spider plantSpider plant

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Lastly, most ivies make excellent house plants because they can take overwatering or no watering, hot and dry or cold and humid. I specifically recommend English ivy (Hedera helix), golden pothos (Epipremnum aureum ‘Golden Queen’), and any of the Philodendrons known as heartleaf philodendron or heartleaf ivy (P. cordatum, P. scandens).

English ivyEnglish ivy

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Golden pothos (also known as Devil’s ivy)Devil's ivy

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Heartleaf ivyHeartleaf ivy

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

My wise old grandmotherI have a Philodendrum cordatum that has been with me since 1966, a cutting taken from my wise old grandmother’s plant.

Her plant was a cutting taken from her mother’s plant in 1930 when my grandmother’s first son, my dad, was born.

My Heartleaf ivyMy Heartleaf Ivy

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

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I'm Zoey the Cool Cat, and I approve this post

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12 thoughts on “Plants for your home that are easy to grow

  1. Naomi Baltuck

    I will have to give some of these a try. Generally I don’t do too well with indoor plants. Right now I have a semi-permanent job babysitting my daughter Bea’s little satsuma, and my son’s tiny grapefruit tree grove. It requires a daily zapping of the little bugs that hatch from the potting soil and eat the leaves, but it’s warm enough now to put them out on the deck and they like being outside.
    A very useful and informative post!

    Liked by 1 person

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  2. jolynnpowers

    I think you hit on every plant that I can grow indoors… I also seem to be ok with African Violets but that is about it … some people just have a knack for growing things and mine is garden squash and peppers and that’s about it… lovely post and so helpful

    Liked by 1 person

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  3. Dan Antion

    Zoey is OK with these? Our cats decimated a Spider Plant within hours of hanging it. I once brought a Palm tree home when our company was moving and getting rid of a lot of plants. Our biggest, oldest male jumped in the pot as soon as I set it down and began tearing the leaves off one by each. That is one cool kitty you have there.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Russel Ray Photos Post author

      Zoey the Cool Cat was a year old when we got her. Whomever had her that first year really trained her well because I have had to do no training whatsoever. She understands a simple “No.” and she knows that she is allowed to go everywhere except on the grand piano, on the dining room table, on the kitchen counters, and on the top of the refrigerator. She could go on the top of the refrigerator if she could figure out a way to get up there without that intermediate stop on the kitchen counters……LOL

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  4. Bluebird Annie

    My husband has a Sansevieria that belonged to his great aunt and I have the philodendron that I bought for my late mom when I was a little girl. Those plants are well more than half a century old now. It’s nice to have those living memories. If they could only talk!

    Liked by 1 person

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