Dust storm in the Southern California high desert

Picture of the Moment

When I was growing up in South Texas, dust storms were as common as the heat, humidity, and hurricanes.

Here in San Diego, not so much.

However, over in the Southern California high desert one can catch dust storms if you’re lucky.

Here’s one near the Salton Sea:

Dust storm in the Southern California high desert near Borrego Springs

The high desert is an important agricultural region in Southern California. With its Mediterranean climate and rich soils, all it needs is a steady source of water, and the many irrigation canals and reservoirs are usually able to supply it. The three-year drought that Southern California is suffering is, however, affecting the agriculture industry.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

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14 thoughts on “Dust storm in the Southern California high desert

  1. ellenrobertsyoung

    That’s a dust storm? Looks like a cross between a dust devil and the trail of a truck on a dirt road. Come to southern New Mexico in April if you’d like to see a real dust storm: the no visibility. close the interstate dust storm. 🙂

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  2. elizabeth

    Russel, I’ve experienced those South Texas dust storms. Highway 48 used to be a nightmare of dust storms. Happily, due to the powers that be allowing the water to run free, we don’t have to deal with that much anymore. :-). Great photograph!

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    1. Russel Ray Photos Post author

      Ah, Highway 48, Brownsville-Port Isabel. Such memories of my younger days. I used to go surfing at Port Isabel on Saturday and in the evening we’d head on over to Brownsville where a friend’s grandparents lived. Stay with them Saturday night and head home to Kingsville.

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