It’s a weather phenomenon, not a people one

Did you know?

Texas A&M UniversityWhen I came to San Diego in April 1993, I heard talk about the “marine layer.” Since my dad was in the Air Force, and I graduated from Texas A&M University with its 2,500-member-strong Corps of Cadets, I thought “Marine” instead of “marine.”

The marine layer is a weather phenomenon, not a people one. It’s a thick layer of clouds that rolls in off the Pacific Ocean as the sun goes down, often staying until noon the next day, depending on when Mr. Sun wants to heat up the air to get rid of it.

Here are two pictures of the marine layer rolling in over SeaWorld:

A morning marine layer rolling in over SeaWorld San Diego

A morning marine layer rolling in over SeaWorld San Diego

When the marine layer gets really low, as it is in those two pictures, you’ll find that the air is damp and you can’t see more than several feet in front of you. In my home state of Texas, we called it fog.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

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13 thoughts on “It’s a weather phenomenon, not a people one

        1. Russel Ray Photos Post author

          I know. I’ve all caught up on the marine layer after being here for 21½ years, but I realize maybe not all my readers are, so thanks for adding to the knowledge base by including the link!

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            1. Russel Ray Photos Post author

              I took meteorology at Texas A&M University in 1976, but if we talked about inversion layers and such, I didn’t remember it. It was an elective, and the only reason I took it was because class would be in the classroom 120 feet up in the Meteorology tower on campus. Keeping in mind that the surrounding geography is flat prairie for 90 miles in all directions, one could see forever from up there. There was an observation room on the fourth floor; the only way to get all the way to the top was to take a meteorology class.

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