San Diego Historical Landmarks—#1: El Prado Designation Area, part 12

San Diego Historical Landmarks

For the introductory blog post to San Diego’s historical landmarks, click on San Diego’s Historical Landmarks.

#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 1
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 2
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 3
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 4
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 5
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 6
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 7
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 8
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 9
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 10
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 11

El Prado Area Designation

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Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Continuing on our west to east travel on El Prado, after the Timken Museum of Art is the most photographed building in San Diego, the Botanical Building:

Botanical Building in San Diego's Balboa Park

It is worthwhile to visit the Botanical Building anytime you are in Balboa Park because, along with the resident plants, there are seasonal displays created by many of the plant societies throughout San Diego County. The most recent display comprises leftover orchids from the latest show of the San Diego Orchid Society.

Orchid Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos of La Mesa California

Orchid Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos of La Mesa California

I could tolerate a few leftover orchids in my gardens!

The Botanical Building and the Lily Pond (aka the Reflecting Pool) were built for the Panama-California Exposition of 1915-1916. The building is one of the largest lath structures in the world. Plantings include more than 2,100 permanent plants comprising mostly cycads, ferns, orchids, palms, and similar tropical plants. The meat-eating-plants bog is one of the best.

Pitcher Plants

The Lily Pond was severely damaged in late 2012 when someone promoted via Facebook a midnight party at the pond. The party turned into a drunken brawl, destroying all of the lilies and damaging the pond and its infrastructure to the tune of about $100,000. Sadly, the perpetrators have not been caught.

 Water Lily

Water Lily

Water lily

Just outside the two entrances to the Botanical Building are two tall, scraggly bushes. The flowers are beautiful:

Flower of the California milkweed

The bushes are Crown Plants (Calotropis gigantea), a member of the milkweed family, which means that throughout the year you can find monarch caterpillars, chrysalises, and butterflies.

Monarch caterpillars, September 2011, San Diego

Chrysalis of a Monarch butterfly

Monarch butterfly

Not surprisingly, adults tend to walk right on by the scraggly bushes. Children, however, are quick to spot the butterflies and caterpillars. If only children didn’t have to grow up to be adults………..

The Lily Pond also is home to fish (mostly koi), the occasional turtle, and birds.

Koi

Sadly, many of the fish and turtles are unwanted “pets” that owners didn’t want anymore, so they dump them in the Lily Pond. The birds, however, come and go, and quite often you can find some Mandarin Ducks hanging out.

Mandarin duck

Admission to the Botanical Building is free. It is open from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. but is closed on Thursdays and holidays. Closing on holidays is somewhat strange because Balboa Park gets extremely crowded on holidays since it’s a regional attraction and destination.

Lotus

Botanical Building in San Diego's Balboa Park

For more about the monarchs of Balboa Park, see my post Monarch—Caterpillar to butterfly (WARNING: graphic content).

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

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12 thoughts on “San Diego Historical Landmarks—#1: El Prado Designation Area, part 12

    1. Russel Ray Photos Post author

      Yep. You can always tell what my favorite pictures are because when I do a post like this, with a little bit of everything, I get to pick and choose from my huge picture collection, and only my favorites make it into this type of post.

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      1. laurie27wsmith

        I have an image of a vast labyrhynth, slides and photos down one side and LP’s on the other. In the middle is a huge table where you scribble away at an endless spread sheet, muttering away about which pic should go op. It’s okay Russel, I have a vivid imagination. 🙂

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        1. Russel Ray Photos Post author

          Prior to 2007, you would have been right! However, I have no more LPs or CDs, having converted everything to digital. I had over 500,000 digital music files but that included individual files for albums and CDs. I have been combining the individual files these past 1½ years to re-create the album or CD, so the actual number of files is falling rather than increasing. However, the average time length of individual files is growing by leaps and bounds.

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  1. Pingback: San Diego Historical Landmarks—#1: El Prado Designation Area, part 13 | Russel Ray Photos

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  6. Pingback: San Diego Historical Landmarks — #1: El Prado Area Designation, part 18 | Russel Ray Photos

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