Propeller at United States Coast Guard, Sector San Diego

One result of bike riding

Out & About

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

There are many advantages of bike riding instead of driving the car or taking the train. One important advantage is exercise. By riding, using up calories and fat, I can eat just about anything I want during the day. Of course, I can also refuse to eat those things I don’t want, like sushi, eggplant, and okra gumbo….

A disadvantage of bike riding is that one cannot go very far in the course of a day.

The way to work around the disadvantage is to buy a bike rack for the car, load the bike on the bike rack, drive to places unknown, park, unload the bike from the bike rack, and set off on a biking expedition.

Recently I did that and discovered the United States Coast Guard, Sector San Diego:

United States Coast Guard, San Diego California

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

That is directly across from San Diego International Airport on North Harbor Drive:

Location of United States Coast Guard, Sector San Diego

View Larger Map

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Look at the right side of the picture and you see a huge propeller. In order to get a picture—and you know I did!—I had to stop pedaling, apply the brakes, come to a complete stop, get off my bike, lower the kickstand, and walk over to the propeller, all while the Coast Guard security personnel were eyeing me suspiciously. Once I brought my camera up into picture-taking position, they went back to their work.

Propeller looks like this:

Propeller at United States Coast Guard, Sector San Diego

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

The plaque to the right tells me that this is a tribute to the men and women of the United States Coast Guard on the occasion of the Coast Guard’s bicentennial in 1990.

United States Coast Guard, San Diego California

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Unfortunately, there was nothing in English to tell me anything about the propeller. There were some indigenous letters and numbers on the propeller….

United States Coast Guard, San Diego California

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Not much there for the layperson, although I do understand diameter (it’s big!), pitch, weight (it weighs seven times more than I do!), manganese bronze (one of many alloys that are called bronze), and Columbian Bronze Corporation.

Columbian Bronze Corporation piqued my interest, but it is not in Wikipedia. Google, however, led me to quite a few entries. One entry is from Google Books: America’s Maritime Progress by George Weiss and J.W. Leonard, published in 1920 by The New York Marine News Company. The second page of the Google Books entry indicates that the book was presented to the New York Public Library by George Weiss on July 12, 1920. Thank you, Mr. Weiss! Page 458 has an entry about the Columbian Bronze Corporation.

There also is a 1941 catalog of Columbian Propellers and Accessories available at Amazon.

Unfortunately, I could not find any current information about Columbian Bronze Corporation, just past catalogs, stories, propellers, and other marine parts, so it appears to me that they now are out of business.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

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Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

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8 thoughts on “One result of bike riding

    1. Russel Ray Photos Post author

      Yes, they do, but in order to use them, one has to be one of the first two bikes rider with a bike on the bus. There usually is only room for two bikes. The trains, though, allow bikes inside the cars, and there is a San Diego Trolley station just a bock down the hill from me.

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