Stairs

House & Home—Walk this way

House & Home

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

One of the reasons why I continue to add plug-ins to Photoshop is because I have a lot of older photos that are bad because they were taken with little point & shoots, usually at home inspections where I didn’t need great clarity, contrast, etc. I like them but have no creative idea of what to do with them. Many of the plug-ins can give me ideas.

Following are three pictures of walkways—two exterior stairs and one path. All three of these create trip hazards, a major cause of accident and injury around our homes. That was why I took a picture of them to begin with, to warn my Clients about trip hazards. Even if they were not trip hazards in and of themselves, whenever you’re somewhere unfamiliar, such as a new home you just bought, you will fine trip hazards as you become accustomed to that home.

Stairs

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Stairs

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Path

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

These three pictures specifically illustrate poor construction of the stairs and paths. As a disclaimer, I’ll say that I like unique and unusual just as much as the next person, but when it comes to finding and using trip hazards, I’m a poster boy.

The two stairways are uneven in their vertical rise or their horizontal run, sometimes both, as well as their width. If you pay attention to how you walk, you’ll find that you don’t look down at each and every step once you get an overall view of what you’re going to be doing. You simply walk. When the rise and run is inconsistent, or each step has a different width, you either have to continue to look down and risk running into something else (bushes), or you have to pay attention to where you’re going, instead of how you’re going, and risk tripping.

The path creates a trip hazard because of how Mother and Father Nature built the human body. You don’t walk by placing one foot directly in front of another, so a straight path like that creates trip hazards. If you create a path out of stepping stones, stagger them off center so that one can walk naturally on them. Every other one should be placed left of center, for the left foot, and all others right of center, for the right foot:

Correct path

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

A pathway constructed of stepping stones, gravel, bark, and other loose landscaping materials will never be even, so you still have to be extraordinarily careful. If you like that kind of landscaping, install landscape lighting in case you have to walk that way in the dark. Also, before you build it, walk the path you’re going to build. Wear shoes that have a good sole pattern so you can see exactly where your feet land during your normal walking pace. Place large stepping stones where your footprints are.

Because these three pictures illustrate doom, I went looking for a filter that could take a bad picture and make it look doomy. In this case, I used filters in the Topaz plug-in.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

Looking for real estate services in San Diego County?
I can highly recommend
James Frimmer, Realtor
Century 21 Award, BRE #01458572

If you’re looking for a home inspector,
I recommend Russel Ray — that’s me!Real Estate Solutions

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Advertisements

14 thoughts on “House & Home—Walk this way

  1. Gallivanta

    “Falling in the home causes more injuries to New Zealanders than road
    accidents and workplace injuries
    combined. Many of these falls occurred
    on steps and stairs” This is from our national Accident Compensation organisation. They would love your post! If we fall on our stairs and steps the Accident Compensation Corporation picks up the tab!!!!!!!

    Like

    Reply
      1. Gallivanta

        We do, but some say that having easy access to the national insurance scheme encourages us to be careless. However, I have been very grateful to ACC because even a very careful person like me has an occasional accident.

        Like

        Reply
      1. europasicewolf

        There’s hope for me yet then! I was actually eyeing up a good-looking bunch of lads at the time and failed to see the rock solid, very unmoving lampost gracing my path till the last minute…never worked out where the gash on the head that landed me up in A&E came from though! I am now scared stiff of lamposts and give them a very wide berth…I now optimistically hope to follow in your well trained footsteps! lol 😉

        Like

        Reply

Let your words flow

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s