Port of San Diego

Industrial pineapple

How I Did It

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

The Port of San Diego is a major import location for Dole:

Port of San Diego

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Port of San Diego

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Dole Honduras ship

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Dole shipping containers

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Which reminds me of my wise old grandmother’s pineapple upside-down cake because she used Dole pineapples. That’s neither here nor there, though, but why can’t anyone make a pineapple upside-down cake as good as my wise old grandmother’s?

It’s difficult to get good pictures of operations at the Port of San Diego or the Dole container facility because one has to climb a fence and trespass on the property of the BNSF Railroad, or traipse along a bridge on a very busy Harbor Boulevard. I chose traipsing and, using my 300mm lens, got the above pictures. However, most of my pictures were cruddy since I was dodging cars at the same time I was taking pictures. Here’s one of the cruddy ones:

Dole container facility in San Diego

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

I like that cruddy one, though. I like all the trucks, I like the tall light poles, and I like the crane.

Although it’s not worthy of using as a picture, as my wise old grandmother might say, “It’s just the basics to start with.” So I started with it, took it to Photoshop CC, and applied various filters to it to make it a work of art. Following are the ones I liked.

This one uses the Colored Pencil filter. I like it because the crane stands out with its blue base.

Dole trucks using the Colored Pencil filter in Photoshop CC

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

This one uses the Fresco filter. I always think of industrial facilities as heavy polluters, and I think the Fresco filter conveys pollution.

Dole trucks using the Fresco filter in Photoshop CC

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

The Glowing Edges filter gives a nighttime feeling.

Dole trucks using the Glowing Edges filter in Photoshop CC

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

The Neon Glow filter. For some reason I simply like how the filter applied its effects to the lower part of all the trucks.

Dole trucks using the Neon Glow filter in Photoshop CC

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

My favorite, the Photocopy filter:

Dole trucks using the Photocopy filter in Photoshop CC

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

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Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

21 thoughts on “Industrial pineapple

    1. Russel Ray Photos Post author

      We didn’t have freeways in my hometown but she did used to say, “Go outside and play.” I don’t think parents say that anymore. Maybe “Go watch a DVD” or “Go listen to your iTunes” or “Go play with your iPad”………lol

      There are a lot of recipes from my wise old grandmother that I wish I had. Sadly, all of them were in her head. No one knew that. We all thought we’d find lots of recipe books everywhere when she died. Nothing nowhere. Not a single recipe for her cakes, pies, cinnamon rolls, jams and preserves……….

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  1. Gallivanta

    The one I like the best is your grandmother’s pineapple upside down cake. I make an upside down cake using Dole pineapple. It’s very, very good but ,perhaps, not as good as your grandmother’s. 🙂

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        1. Russel Ray Photos Post author

          I doubt it. My family was a do-it-yourself family. Things were simply passed down from generation to generation. I suspect the recipe is from the 1920s when the first pineapple upside down cake appeared in the United States, and probably the world. That would be right for my maternal great grandmother who would have been in her late 20s. She was a super cook and I suspect that my wise old grandmother got the receipt from her. Sadly, though, my great grandmother also never wrote any recipes down so I think this recipe is history.

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        1. Russel Ray Photos Post author

          I familiar with that site. It’s been up for many years and was one of the first places I went to look for recipes in 2007 when I found out that no one had my wise old grandmother’s recipe. She died in 2003, and after four years of not having it’s flavors on my palate, I went searching.

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          1. Gallivanta

            Ah, you were indeed in need of pineapple upside down comfort cake 🙂 Well, although I have been making PUDC for years and years, I knew none of its history and nothing about Doles facilities in San Diego. So I have learned a great deal today.

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        2. Russel Ray Photos Post author

          I think I might get ambitious, though, and see what PUDC recipes I can find and do a little cooking. I’m sure I can make a better one than all this junk that the stores sell. My question, though, is why don’t restaurants, pastry shops, and dessert restaurants make PUDC?

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          1. Gallivanta

            I am sure you could make something better than the stores sell. Most store cakes are woeful. Maybe the restaurants etc think PUDC is too old-fashioned, or they have no idea how delicious it is because they didn’t have wise old grandmothers who knew how to make it. I have also made pear upside down cake and, recently, a rhubarb upside down cake. It’s a very versatile recipe .

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