Tag Archives: marbled duck pictures

Knobbed Hornbill at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park

Birds of a feather

San Diego Zoo Safari Park

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

They (and I don’t know who “they” are) say that birds of a feather flock together.

Not necessarily by choice sometimes.

Following are some birds that reside at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park, previously known as the Wild Animal Park, located near Escondido, about 40 miles north northeast of downtown San Diego.

San Diego Zoo's Safari Park

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Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Green Wood HoopoeGreen Wood Hoopoe at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park

The Green Wood Hoopoe (Phoeniculus purpureus) is native to Africa. It is mainly a ground-feeding bird, specifically loving termites!

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Hooded VultureHooded Vulture at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park

In December 2011, the Safari Park added quite a few vultures. They now seem to be acclimated to their exhibit so they are easier to see and photograph. The Hooded Vulture (Necrosyrtes monachus) is related to eagles and buzzards but is the only bird in the Necrosyrtes genus. It is native to Africa, south of the Sahara Desert, and is an endangered bird.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Abyssinian Ground HornbillHornbill at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park

I couldn’t find a nameplate for this bird at the Park, but I believe it is the Abyssinian Ground Hornbill, also called the Northern Ground Hornbill (Bucorvus abyssinicus). Wikipedia has a picture of one at the San Diego Zoo. Coincidentally (or not) their bird looks very much like this bird. This is one of the largest of the hornbill species, getting up to 39 inches tall and 8.8 pounds.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Knobbed HornbillKnobbed Hornbill at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park

The Knobbed Hornbill (Aceros cassidix) is from Indonesia and is listed as a vulnerable species. Hornbills are monogamous birds.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Long-toed LapwingLong-toed Lapwing at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park

Sometimes birds don’t cooperate with photographers, and this is a great picture confirming that. It just seems logical that if a bird was named “Long-toed,” then the picture should include the toes. Alas. The Long-toed Lapwing (Vanellus crassirostris) is a common bird in much of Africa.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Mandarin DuckMandarin Duck at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park

The Mandarin Duck (Aix galericulata) has to be one of the most beautiful ducks. Originally native to East Asia, populations have become established in Great Britain, Ireland, Germany, North Carolina, and in Sonoma County (San Francisco Bay area) in California.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Marbled TealMarbled Teal at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park

The Marbled Teal, also called Marbled Duck (Marmaronetta angustirostris) is native to the Mediterranean. It is listed as a vulnerable species due to habitat destruction (it loves marshes) and hunting.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

African Golden OrioleNorth African Golden Oriole at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park

The African Golden Oriole (Oriolus auratus) is a shy bird, often hiding in the trees and bushes. I’m lucky to have gotten a fairly good picture of one.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Oriole WarblerOriole Warbler at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park

The Oriole Warbler (Hypergerus atriceps) is native to West Africa. As I was doing research for this post, I found that the Oriole Warbler is considered a “skulking passerine.” Skulking in this sense means to annoy or upset, and passerine is a perching bird or, less accurately, a songbird. So I’m getting the impression that this is a perching songbird that likes to annoy other birds. (I know some people who could be considered skulking.)

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Pink-backed PelicanPink-backed Pelican at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park

Pelicans perhaps are my favorite bird that I actually can see in the wild here in San Diego. This pair of Pink-backed Pelicans (Pelecanus rufescens) is one of my favorite bird pictures in my photography collection. They are native to Africa and southern Arabia. It is one of the smaller pelicans but can get up to 61 inches in length with a wingspan up to 9½ feet.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Rainbow LorikeetRainbow Lory at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park

These two Rainbow Lorikeets (Trichoglossus haematodus) were fighting for several minutes as I watched. I think you can see which was winning the fight although, as evidenced here, they eventually made up…. I think. Rainbow Lorikeets are from Australia.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

ShoebillShoebill at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park

The Shoebill (Balaeniceps rex) is the oddest-looking I think I’ve ever seen. Ornithologists consider it the missing link that connects storks and pelicans. It can get as tall as 60 inches, is native to the freshwater swamps of Africa, and is listed as vulnerable due to habitat destruction.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

South African ShelduckSouth African Shelduck at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park

The South African Shelduck is, uh, from Africa, but you probably guessed that. This one is a male and the one below is a female.

South African Shelduck at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Southern Bald IbisSouthern Bald Ibis at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park

The Southern Bald Ibis (Geronticus calvus) is another vulnerable species native to Africa.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Swan GooseSwan Goose at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park

The Swan Goose (Anser cygnoides) is native to China, Mongolia, and Russia. It has become domesticated, and the ones at Safari Park are a lot of fun to feed. The Park has candy machines modified to provide food to feed them, and for just 50¢. However, I can attest that ten handfuls of food at 50¢ each adds up quickly, like to $5! More than a gallon of gas!

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Egyptian VultureWestern Egyptian Vulture at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park

This is another vulture that resides in the new vulture exhibit with the Hooded Vulture mentioned above. I love it’s feathered face. The Egyptian Vulture (Neophron percnopterus) feeds mainly on carrion but will prey on small mammals, birds, and reptiles. Although the use of tools is rare in birds, the Egyptian Vulture also feeds on the eggs of other birds by tossing pebbles onto them to break them open. Egyptian Vultures also use twigs to roll up wool to use in their nests.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Harris HawkWestern Harris' Hawk at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park

The Harris Hawk (Parabuteo unicinctus) is native to the southwestern United States south to Chile and Argentina. It is one of the few birds that hunts in packs.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

White-crowned Robin-chatWhite-crowned Robin-chat at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park

I could not find any interesting information about the White-crowned Robin-chat (Cossypha albicapilla), but it’s still pretty!

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

White-headed LapwingWhite-headed Lapwing at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park

The White-headed Lapwing (Vanellus albiceps) is a wading bird native to the tropical areas of Africa.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Yellow-billed StorkYellow-billed Stork at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park

The Yellow-billed Stork (Mycteria ibis) was once native to Africa and Madagascar, but as the human population has overpopulated the Earth to the tune of over six billion people, storks have been used worldwide to bring babies into homes. You can see why in this picture:

Yellow-billed Stork at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

I'm Zoey the Cool Cat, and I approve this post

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James Frimmer, Realtor
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If you’re looking for a home inspector,
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Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

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End of the world postponed, so it’s off to the San Diego Zoo!

San Diego Zoo logo

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

I was successful at getting the Mayans to postpone the end of the world to 3012. Of course, just like the government, that means I kicked the problem down the road. We’ll let our great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great grandchildren deal with it.

Meanwhile, enjoy some more pictures of wildlife that make the San Diego Zoo their home. I hope I’m not boring you with San Diego Zoo pictures. If I am, well, bear with me; it’s my favorite place to go to get away from it all and relax for a couple of hours.

Arabian oryx at the San Diego Zoo

I’m not sure I would want to run around all my life with three-foot spikes sticking out of my head, but maybe next Halloween I’ll try it.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Lesser kudu at the San Diego Zoo

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Ross's Goose at the San Diego Zoo

Several decades ago I worked as a copywriter/editor/proofer for the University Press, the College of Science, and the Department of Chemistry at Texas A&M University. That’s when I overcame my fear of the possessive S, as in Ross’s Goose above.

There are a couple of general rules that you can follow which are good in 99% of the cases. First, if you pronounce the possessive S, then use the apostrophe S. Since I pronounce Ross’s as Ross-es, I spell it with the apostrophe S. A couple of well-known exceptions are Jesus and Texas. Even though you pronounce the possessive S, you don’t use the S after the apostrophe (Jesus’, not Jesus’s, and Texas’, not Texas’s).

Another exception is that you don’t use the ending S if the following word begins with an S. For example, if that were Ross’ Snow Goose, the S that would normally be after the apostrophe gets left off. Too many Ses (S’s?) in a row would make you think of, what? A snake.

Albino Burmese Python at the San Diego Zoo

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Ring-necked Duck at the San Diego Zoo

Mr. Ring-necked Duck looks like he has a little attitude. I promised him that none of my blog readers would make fun of him, so be sure to LIKE him.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Smew at the San Diego Zoo

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Andean Condor at the San Diego Zoo

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

These next two birds might not actually make their homes at the San Diego Zoo because they are free to come and go, visiting the wonderful San Diego area at will. However, if you could make your home at the San Diego Zoo, where you would get regular feedings and have people oooh and aaah over you, well, wouldn’t you?………:)

Great Blue Heron at the San Diego Zoo

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Great Egret at the San Diego Zoo

I’ve always known the Great Egret by that name but recently I read a blog from a blogger in Florida who called it a Great White Heron, which is also one of its common names.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Marbled Duck at the San Diego Zoo

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Ashy-headed Goose at the San Diego Zoo

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Coronated Fruit Dove at the San Diego Zoo

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Johnston's Crocodile at the San Diego Zoo

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Fishing Cat at the San Diego Zoo

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Visayan Warty Pig at the San Diego Zoo

The Visayan Warty Pig is a juvenile, so it does not have a single wart yet.

Once you see an adult, you’ll truly believe that there are faces that only a mother could love.

Here, let me show you one:

Visayan Warty Pig at the San Diego Zoo

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Hippopotamus at the San Diego Zoo

The hippopotamus is a young one, born on January 26, 2011, which happens to be my wise old grandmother‘s birthday. She would have been exactly 100 years old, so I have a special fondness for that little hippo.

This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

Looking for real estate services in San Diego County?
I can highly recommend
James Frimmer, Realtor
Century 21 Award, DRE #01458572

If you’re looking for a home inspector,
I recommend Russel Ray — that’s me!Real Estate Solutions

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos