Category Archives: Out & About

I dream of a woodie

Out & About

For Christmas 1967, my oldest uncle bought a new car for his family, and they drove from Chatsworth (Los Angeles) to Kingsville, Texas, to spend Christmas with my wise old grandmother and me.

The new car he bought was a 1968 Mercury Colony Park station wagon. I fell in love with the car because it had wood on the exterior rear and sides.

A decade later I went to a car show in Houston that featured “Woodies.” Since then I have had a fascination with surfing Woodies from the ’50s and ’60s.

Today I went to Encinitas, about 45 miles from me, to see Woodies in all their spectacular glory. This was my favorite:

Woodie in Encinitas, California, on 9-20-14

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Woodie in Encinitas, California, on 9-20-14

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Woodie in Encinitas, California, on 9-20-14

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

It was for sale but, sadly, all of these Woodies were way out of my price range, including this 1951 Ford Woodie for just $7,500:

1951 Ford Woodie

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

The price for that Woodie pretty much tells you the price for the restored Woodies in immaculate condition.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

This post approved by
This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

Need a unique gift?
Visit Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos at Fine Art America.

photograhic art taking pictures making art

About these ads

My fascination with heavy industry developed when I was six

Out & About

I lived in Brigham City, Utah, after my dad committed suicide, from 1961-1965.

Not too far from where we lived was a Thiokol plant, a gravel pit, and a railroad yard—lots of heavy industry.

That heavy industry created in me an appreciation and fascination with heavy industry, so whenever I’m out and about, and come across heavy industry, even if I don’t have a clue what it is, well, pictures of it are going to make their way into my photograph collection.

I traveled all the way up to Los Angeles and then headed east about sixty miles, to get these pictures of heavy industry in and around Pomona:

Water tower

Heavy industry

Pipes

Heavy industry

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

This post approved by
This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

Need a unique gift?
Visit Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos at Fine Art America.

photograhic art taking pictures making art

San Diego Historical Landmarks — #1: El Prado Area Designation, part 18

San Diego Historical Landmarks

For the introductory blog post to San Diego’s historical landmarks, click on San Diego’s Historical Landmarks.

#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 1
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 2
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 3
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 4
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 5
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 6
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 7
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 8
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 9
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 10
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 11
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 12
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 13
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 14
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 15
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 16
#1: El Prado Area Designation, part 17

El Prado Area Designation

View Larger Map

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

This is it, Folks! Our last stop on the El Prado Designation Area, and it’s a beautiful one, too. Looks like this:

Bea Evenson Fountain in San Diego's Balboa ParkBea Evenson Fountain & Reuben H. Fleet Science Center
in San Diego’s Balboa Park

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

That’s the Bea Evenson Fountain. It sits in the plaza between the Reuben H. Fleet Science Center in the picture (also see part 17) and the San Diego Natural History Museum (see part 16).

If you’re like me, you are wondering why Bea Evenson gets a beautiful fountain. Well….

Bea Evenson and Natural History Museum in San Diego's Balboa ParkBea Evenson Fountain and Natural History Museum
in San Diego’s Balboa Park.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Bea Evenson is the person pretty much directly responsible for us having most of the beautiful buildings along El Prado. History reports that many of the buildings were built as temporary structures for the 1915 Panama-California Exhibition. They were to be torn down after the Exhibition, but the citizenry took a liking to them and they were allowed to stand.

By the 1960s, however, the temporary structures were in a state of serious disrepair and certainly would not be able to withstand a significant earthquake. They were scheduled to be demolished in the mid-1960s.

Children playing in Bea Evenson Fountain in San Diego's Balboa Park

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Bea Evenson refused to sit idly by while the beautiful buildings were destroyed. She created a Committee of 100 to work at saving the buildings, hoping to get 100 people working to help preserve the buildings. Instead, of 1,000 people stepped up to the plate.

A bond measure was passed by the voters, and funds were raised to renovate the buildings, retaining the exterior designs but incorporating a more practical interior. Plastic molds were made of all the bas-relief sculptures so that the new façade would be identical to the old. Some of the original sculptures are on display in various areas of Balboa Park.

Without Bea Evanson, the El Prado Designation Area would be without many of the buildings that we have visited on our trek down El Prado.

So here’s to Bea Evanson, the Committee of 100, and all the Bea Evansons of the world who refuse to let history be destroyed.

Bea Evenson Fountain in San Diego's Balboa Park

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

This post approved by
This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

Need a unique gift?
Visit Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos at Fine Art America.
photograhic art taking pictures making art

Today’s weather brought to you by….

Picture of the Moment

Weather in San Diego was kind of crazy today. Unfortunately, where I live in La Mesa was not included in the craziness. All I got here was sunshine, ten minutes of clouds, one clap of thunder, and then sunshine again.

Some areas, including here in La Mesa, got up to 106°F. Fortunately, we used modern technology to keep the house cool.

Some areas lost power, and some areas still are without power tonight, with temperatures still hovering in the 80s with 40% humidity.

All very unusual conditions for us this time of year.

And with that update on the weather, I leave you with these clouds from my journey to the high desert last month:

Desert clouds

For the record, it did rain on me in the eastern area of the high desert, and the rains brought some flash floods to the area. Those conditions, however, are common for where I was.

copy-image002.jpg

This post approved by
This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

Need a unique gift?
Visit Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos at Fine Art America.

photograhic art taking pictures making art

I’m pretty sure I’m not buying

Picture of the Moment

Recently—last night!—I discovered the publish-in-the-future function of WordPress, so if a post pops up on my blog at, say, midnight plus one minute, that’s not me!

I’m still sorting through the billions and billions and billions of pictures from my 476-mile journey through Southern California on August 12. Here is one of my favorites:

I'm not buying

I don’t know what they are farming out there, but I’m pretty sure that whatever it is, I ain’t buying….

I’m still exploring special Photographic Art effects for that picture because the vastness of the landscape, the beauty of the sky, and the barren “farm” is just begging for some very special effects.

copy-image002.jpg

This post approved by This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

Need a unique gift?
Visit Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos at Fine Art America.

photograhic art taking pictures making art

At least you can tell which way the wind is blowing

Picture of the Moment

Having lived in several large cities—Houston, Detroit, Philadelphia, San Francisco, San Diego—throughout my life, I am accustomed to large airports with planes landing and taking off every thirty seconds from 6:00 a.m. to midnight.

I find that many smaller airports don’t have quite the amenities of their big brothers, such as the Ocotillo Wells Airport about ninety miles due east of San Diego. Looks like this:

IMG_7869 ocotillo wells airport faa framed

No vending machines…. no outlets to charge one’s phone or laptop computer…. no water fountains…. no restaurants…. no restrooms…. no lounge to catch up on news, weather, and sports…. no hard surface runways…. no baggage claim…. no ticket counters…. no strip search to get into the airport….

….heck, no airplanes!

But at least you can tell which way the wind is blowing.

copy-image002.jpg

This post approved by This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

Need a unique gift?
Visit Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos at Fine Art America.

photograhic art taking pictures making art

Fire on the horizon (also called “sunrise”)

Picture of the Moment

When I started composing my post this morning about the Reuben H. Fleet Science Center, I realized that I, uh, didn’t have any pictures of the Reuben H. Fleet Science Center. Or at least, none that I could find.

That was at 5:00 a.m., so I jumped in the car and headed to Balboa Park. The sun was due to come up around 6:00 a.m., and the park would not yet be crowded, so I should be able to get back home by 7:30 a.m.

And I did, even though I waited around for 15 minutes to get these two pictures:

Fire on the horizon

Sunrise in San Diego's Balboa Park on Sunday, 9-14-14

There are exactly fifteen minutes between the two pictures.

copy-image002.jpg

This post approved by This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

Need a unique gift?
Visit Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos at Fine Art America.

photograhic art taking pictures making art