Category Archives: Music on Mondays

Music on Mondays (6-29-15)—The dead heart lives here

The Music Chronicles of Russel Ray

One of the things that I am doing with my vast music collection is equalizing it, making the quiet songs louder and the loud songs quieter. I can then listen to my music without constantly adjusting the volume for each song.

I also am equalizing the channels. The Beatles, in exploring stereo separation, have some of the worst songs with unequal channels. Not in my music collection!

Two things I have noticed about equalizing channels and songs:

First, the words are clearer, and since I’m a singer, I really enjoy being able to hear AND understand the lyrics. That particularly applies to heavy metal songs where the words often are obscured by the music, leaving one to simply nod (thrash?) one’s head and hum along.

Second, the intricacies of the music are more noticeable. It’s like taking a picture into Photoshop and using various filters to discover details and colors that did not appear to be in the picture as it came out of the camera:

img_2034 wagon wheel stamp

img_2034 wagon wheel altered stamp

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Such was the case this morning when I listened to the album “Diesel and Dust” by Midnight Oil, a band out of Australia that was active from 1976 to 2002.

Arguably their best album, it is a concept album about both the struggles of indigenous Australians and environmental causes. I had no idea, mainly because I never could understand all the words and never had the motivation to find all the lyrics to all the songs.

When I equalized the album this morning and then listened to it, words were understandable, and listening to the words caused me to do a little research about the album and songs.

My favorite song from the album used to be “Beds Are Burning.” Here it is unequalized from YouTube:

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“Beds Are Burning” was the second single from the album but the first to chart in the United States, reaching #17 on the Billboard Hot 100. It also is their highest charting single in the U.S., of only three that charted here.

Other countries liked the song much better than the Americans. It reached #1 in Canada, New Zealand, and South Africa; #2 in Belgium; #3 in the Netherlands; #5 in France; #6 in Australia and Great Britain; and #11 in Ireland. Interesting that New Zealand liked the song better than the Australians did….

According to Wikipedia, “Beds Are Burning” is a protest song about giving native Australian lands back to the Pintupi, among the last indigenous people to come in from the desert. The Pintupi moved from the Gibson Desert to settlements and missions in the 1930s with more forcibly moved in the 1950s and ’60s to the Papunya settlement. They returned to their own country in 1981, establishing the Kintore community which currently has a population of about 400.

After listening to the equalized album, I’m liking “The Dead Heart” better than “Beds Are Burning.” Here’s the unequalized song from YouTube:

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Wikipedia again: “The song deals with the mistreatment of indigenous Australians and the nonrecognition of indigenous cultures in Australia, and was part of efforts to raise awareness of Australia’s Stolen Generations—the forcible removal of Australian Aboriginal children from their families between 1909 and the 1970s.”

Here is the entire “Diesel and Dust” album (unequalized) should you like to listen to it:

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Music on Mondays (6-22-15)—Communist music from the Red Scare era….

The Music Chronicles of Russel Ray

On this date in 1950, Red Channels: The Report of Communist Influence in Radio and Television was issued. It was compiled by the rightwing journal Counterattack, self-described as the “newsletter of facts to combat Communism.”

Gotta love those rightwing nuts. NOT! They have been creating mass hysteria for decades, and they just go on and on….

Obama is coming for your guns….

Obama is a Socialist….

Obama was born in Kenya….

Obama is invading Texas….

Obama is a Muslim….

….smh….

The Red Scare of the ’40s and ’50s ended the careers of many professionals in Hollywood, obviously a bastion of Communism then and now….

Many in the music industry also were targeted by Red Channels—Leonard Bernstein, Aaron Copland, Lena Horne, Pete Seeger, Artie Shaw, Larry Adler, Burl Ives—all named as suspected Communist sympathizers.

Why were they suspected of being Communist sympathizers? Evidence included Lena Horne’s name on the letterhead of a South African famine relief program, Aaron Copland’s 1949 appearance at a Scientific and Cultural Conference for World Peace, and Leonard Bernstein’s affiliation with the Committee to Re-Elect Benjamin J. Davis, a black, socialist New York City councilman, Artie Shaw was a member of the World Peace Council…..

….smh…….again

For today’s Music on Mondays, I thought we should enjoy a few pieces of Communist music from these folks.

“Sonata for Clarinet and Piano,” Leonard Bernstein, 1942
(His first published work. Definitely sounds Communistic.)

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“Fanfare for the Common Man,” Aaron Copland, 1942
(1942 obviously was the Year of Communism in Music)

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“Stormy Weather,” Lena Horne, 1943

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“Where Have All The Flowers Gone?”, Pete Seeger, 1955

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“Concert for Clarinet,” Artie Shaw, 1941

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“Genevieve Waltz,” Larry Adler, 1953

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“The Wayfaring Stranger,” Burl Ives, 1944

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I’m pretty sure I’m a Communist since I love all this music………..smh one more time.

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The Music Chronicles of Russel Ray

Music on Mondays (6-15-15)—I’m gonna make you, I’m gonna break you

The Music Chronicles of Russel Ray

My wise old grandmotherMy wise old grandmother (picture ►) was not a fan of what she called foul language. Granddad, on the other hand, was the world’s #1 user, with every other word being foul language or some racial or ethnic slur. How they got along for 50 years is beyond me, but maybe they were the definition of “opposites attract.”

She instilled in me that distaste for foul language with just one slap of her hand. Earlier that day I had tacked a black light poster of The Beatles on a wall of my room. She ripped it down, and I do mean ripped. I had saved my allowance for a month to afford that beautiful poster—$3.99! She totally destroyed it.

As I stood over the ruins, I looked at her and yelled “Damn you!” I was 6’3″ and 100 pounds. She was 5’0″ and 140 pounds. With one swing of her arm, she slapped me in the face, knocking me to the ground. She then stood over me and said ever so quietly, “Don’t damn me, damn you.”

Long-time readers will realize that my blog is safe for work with neither foul language nor inappropriate pictures or videos. In fact, if someone leaves what I deem inappropriate language in a comment, well, it’s my blog, and I feel free to edit comments. (English is a beautiful language. Learn how to use that beauty to express its ugliness.)

My collection of music is the same way. Prior to digital music, I would buy a record album and listen to it. Occasionally, I was shocked by what I heard in a song and, whenever that album played in the future, I would skip that song by picking up the needle and placing it on the next song on the record. In today’s world of digital music, I simply pull up the file and delete the song from the album.

Thus, I can count on three fingers the number of songs I have in my music collection with foul language in them. All of them were added in 2015, and one, titled “Star F***er, by Joan Jett & The Blackhearts is getting deleted later today after I listened to it yesterday. I just don’t like it.

Another one has just one inappropriate word. I can’t even remember the song title or the artist, but I remember remarking to Julian that in the context of the song, the inappropriate word was appropriate.

The third song was just added a few days ago. It is titled “Psycho” and is by Muse. I like the song so much that I was encouraged to explore Muse’s discography, and I now have their complete catalog.

Muse has been around since 1994, and “Psycho” is their first song to have an “Explicit Lyrics” label on it. The message of the song is a powerful one about war and “killing machines.” My dad was in the Air Force, and I graduated from Texas A&M University which has a Corps of Cadets that is 2,500 strong, so I’m familiar with this specific language in the context of war.

Along with the message about war, Matthew Bellamy’s guitar and vocals, the driving bass, the drums…. everything about the song really gets me going.

It is 5:50 long, so you’ll hear a lot of inappropriate language. Give it at least one listen to and then make up your mind, but I did warn you about the message and the language.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

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Music on Mondays (6-8-15)—It’s not the first time in my life….

The Music Chronicles of Russel Ray

I’m pretty sure that in one of my past lives I was a bass guitar player.

I just love a good bass rhythm and riffs that drive the song along.

Probably my four favorite bass guitar players are, in order, Paul McCartney, Peter Cetera (Chicago), Wayne Nelson (Little River Band), and Tiran Porter (The Doobie Brothers).

Paul McCartney, of course, needs no introduction. My favorite Beatles song with his driving bass is “Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da” and my favorite post-Beatles song with that driving bass is “Silly Love Songs.”

I think Peter Cetera and Tiran Porter did the same thing with bass for their groups as McCartney did for The Beatles: good quality bass in virtually every song.

Little River Band had gone through two bass guitar players, Roger McLachlan (1975-1976) and George McArdle (1976-1979), before settling on Wayne Nelson (1980-1996, 1999-present).

I’m currently listening to the year 1983 in my non-classical music collection, the year in which Little River Band released their album “The Net.” I didn’t buy and Little River Band albums when they came out but I now have a complete collection of their music. I think “The Net” by far is their best album. Here it is in its entirety with all the great bass:

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

The buying public, however, would disagree with me. “The Net” peaked at #61 on the Billboard 200 album chart and, after 32 years, still is not certified gold. That’s alright. It’s not the first time in my life that I’ve liked something that others didn’t………..LOL

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Music on Mondays (6-1-15)—Bustin’ out all over

The Music Chronicles of Russel Ray

My first experience with musicals was when the State of Utah took me from my mom and stepdad and placed me in the Thomas D. Dee Memorial Hospital in Ogden, Utah. Dee had a special facility for problem children, of which I was one. That was in 1965.

I went to Ogden in 1979 with the intent of obtaining my medical records. Unfortunately, the hospital had been closed. It is now open again as the McKay-Dee Hospital, and the section that took care of me in 1965 is now the Behavioral Health Institute.

While I was there, I met a woman named Barbara Hunt. Throughout the years, I have believed that Barbara was 18 years old, from Bakersfield, California, and also a resident. In thinking about this today, though, I’m not so sure anymore because one afternoon she took me to see a movie double-feature at the local theater. What hospital would allow an 18-year-old resident to take an 11-year-old resident to the movies? Now I’m thinking it was all a part of the behavioral health program for problem youth…..

I have been searching for Barbara Hunt all these years, but maybe I’ve been looking in the wrong place. Maybe I’ve even been looking for the wrong person. Maybe Barbara Hunt wasn’t her real name.

……………..

The movies we went to see were A Hard Day’s Night and Help! Long-time readers know that I have always been somewhat infatuated with The Beatles (somewhat?), and that’s where my infatuation started.

Those were the first two musicals I ever saw. The third one was The Sound of Music. Although The Sound of Music had been released in March 1965, it didn’t make it to Kingsville, Texas, until a couple of years later. Kingsville, a small bastian of Christian Republican farmers and ranchers, was a little behind the times then (and still are). After seeing The Sound of Music, I was definitely hooked on musicals, especially those with music by Richard Rogers and Oscar Hammerstein (Oklahoma, Carousel, South Pacific, The King and I….)

Thus, every year when June comes around, I always think of Carousel and the song “June Is Bustin Out All Over.” Here it is:

Happy June! 

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Music on Mondays (5-25-15)—The military-industrial complex

The Music Chronicles of Russel Ray

Here in the United States it is Memorial Day, a day to remember those who died while serving in the country’s armed forces. It occurs annually on the last Monday in May.

Since 1776, the United States has been at war 93% of the time, 222 years out of 239.

1776 – American Revolutionary War, Chickamagua Wars, Second Cherokee War, Pennamite-Yankee War

1777 – American Revolutionary War, Chickamauga Wars, Second Cherokee War, Pennamite-Yankee War

1778 – American Revolutionary War, Chickamauga Wars, Pennamite-Yankee War

1779 – American Revolutionary War, Chickamauga Wars, Pennamite-Yankee War

1780 – American Revolutionary War, Chickamauga Wars, Pennamite-Yankee War

1781 – American Revolutionary War, Chickamauga Wars, Pennamite-Yankee War

1782 – American Revolutionary War, Chickamauga Wars, Pennamite-Yankee War

1783 – American Revolutionary War, Chickamauga Wars, Pennamite-Yankee War

1784 – Chickamauga Wars, Pennamite-Yankee War, Oconee War
1785 – Chickamauga Wars, Northwest Indian War

1786 – Chickamauga Wars, Northwest Indian War

1787 – Chickamauga Wars, Northwest Indian War

1788 – Chickamauga Wars, Northwest Indian War

1789 – Chickamauga Wars, Northwest Indian War

1790 – Chickamauga Wars, Northwest Indian War

1791 – Chickamauga Wars, Northwest Indian War

1792 – Chickamauga Wars, Northwest Indian War

1793 – Chickamauga Wars, Northwest Indian War

1794 – Chickamauga Wars, Northwest Indian War

1795 – Northwest Indian War

Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery in San Diego, California1796 – No major war

1797 – No major war

1798 – Quasi-War

1799 – Quasi-War

1800 – Quasi-War

1801 – First Barbary War

1802 – First Barbary War

1803 – First Barbary War

1804 – First Barbary War

1805 – First Barbary War

1806 – Sabine Expedition

1807 – No major war

1808 – No major war

1809 – No major war

1810 – U.S. occupies Spanish-held West Florida

1811 – Tecumseh’s War

1812 – War of 1812, Tecumseh’s War, Seminole Wars, U.S. ccupies Spanish-held Amelia Island and other parts of East Florida

1813 – War of 1812, Tecumseh’s War, Peoria War, Creek War, U.S. expands its territory in West Florida

1814 – War of 1812, Creek War, U.S. expands its territory in Florida, Anti-piracy war

1815 – War of 1812, Second Barbary War, Anti-piracy war

1816 – First Seminole War, Anti-piracy war

1817 – First Seminole War, Anti-piracy war

1818 – First Seminole War, Anti-piracy war

1819 – Yellowstone Expedition, Anti-piracy war

1820 – Yellowstone Expedition, Anti-piracy war

1821 – Anti-piracy war

1822 – Anti-piracy war

1823 – Anti-piracy war, Arikara War

1824 – Anti-piracy war

1825 – Yellowstone Expedition, Anti-piracy war

1826 – No major war

1827 – Winnebago War

1828 – No major war

1829 – No major war

1830 – No major war 

1831 – Sac and Fox Indian War

1832 – Black Hawk War

1833 – Cherokee Indian War

1834 – Cherokee Indian War, Pawnee Indian Territory Campaign

1835 – Cherokee Indian War, Seminole Wars, Second Creek War

1836 – Cherokee Indian War, Seminole Wars, Second Creek War, Missouri-Iowa Border War

1837 – Cherokee Indian War, Seminole Wars, Second Creek War, Osage Indian War, Buckshot War

1838 – Cherokee Indian War, Seminole Wars, Buckshot War, Heatherly Indian War

1839 – Cherokee Indian War, Seminole Wars

1840 – Seminole Wars, U.S. naval forces invade Fiji Islands

1841 – Seminole Wars, U.S. naval forces invade McKean Island, Gilbert Islands, and Samoa

1842 – Seminole Wars

1843 – U.S. forces clash with Chinese, U.S. troops invade African coast

1844 – Texas-Indian Wars

1845 – Texas-Indian Wars

1846 – Mexican-American War, Texas-Indian Wars

1847 – Mexican-American War, Texas-Indian Wars

1848 – Mexican-American War, Texas-Indian Wars, Cayuse War

1849 – Texas-Indian Wars, Cayuse War, Southwest Indian Wars, Navajo Wars, Skirmish between 1st Cavalry and Indians

1850 – Texas-Indian Wars, Cayuse War, Southwest Indian Wars, Navajo Wars, Yuma War, California Indian Wars, Pitt River Expedition

1851 – Texas-Indian Wars, Cayuse War, Southwest Indian Wars, Navajo Wars, Apache Wars, Yuma War, Utah Indian Wars, California Indian Wars

1852 – Texas-Indian Wars, Cayuse War, Southwest Indian Wars, Navajo Wars, Yuma War, Utah Indian Wars, California Indian Wars

1853 – Texas-Indian Wars, Cayuse War, Southwest Indian Wars, Navajo Wars, Yuma War, Utah Indian Wars, Walker War, California Indian Wars

1854 – Texas-Indian Wars, Cayuse War, Southwest Indian Wars, Navajo Wars, Apache Wars, California Indian Wars, Skirmish between 1st Cavalry and Indians

1855 – Seminole Wars, Texas-Indian Wars, Cayuse War, Southwest Indian Wars, Navajo Wars, Apache Wars, California Indian Wars, Yakima War, Winnas Expedition, Klickitat War, Puget Sound War, Rogue River Wars, U.S. forces invade Fiji Islands and Uruguay

1856 – Seminole Wars, Texas-Indian Wars, Southwest Indian Wars, Navajo Wars, California Indian Wars, Puget Sound War, Rogue River Wars, Tintic War

1857 – Seminole Wars, Texas-Indian Wars, Southwest Indian Wars, Navajo Wars, California Indian Wars, Utah War, Conflict in Nicaragua

1858 – Seminole Wars, Texas-Indian Wars, Southwest Indian Wars, Navajo Wars, Mohave War, California Indian Wars, Spokane-Coeur d’Alene-Paloos War, Utah War, U.S. forces invade Fiji Islands and Uruguay

1859 – Texas-Indian Wars, Southwest Indian Wars, Navajo Wars, California Indian Wars, Pecos Expedition, Antelope Hills Expedition, Bear River Expedition, John Brown’s raid, U.S. forces launch attack against Paraguay, U.S. forces invade Mexico

1860 – Texas-Indian Wars, Southwest Indian Wars, Navajo Wars, Apache Wars, California Indian Wars, Paiute War, Kiowa-Comanche War

1861 – American Civil War, Texas-Indian Wars, Southwest Indian Wars, Navajo Wars, Apache Wars, California Indian Wars, Cheyenne Campaign

1862 – American Civil War, Texas-Indian Wars, Southwest Indian Wars, Navajo Wars, Apache Wars, California Indian Wars, Cheyenne Campaign, Dakota War of 1862

1863 – American Civil War, Texas-Indian Wars, Southwest Indian Wars, Navajo Wars, Apache Wars, California Indian Wars, Cheyenne Campaign, Colorado War, Goshute War

1864 – American Civil War, Texas-Indian Wars, Navajo Wars, Apache Wars, California Indian Wars, Cheyenne Campaign, Colorado War, Snake War

1865 – American Civil War, Texas-Indian Wars, Navajo Wars, Apache Wars, California Indian Wars, Colorado War, Snake War, Utah’s Black Hawk War

1866 – Texas-Indian Wars, Navajo Wars, Apache Wars, California Indian Wars, Skirmish between 1st Cavalry and Indians, Snake War, Utah’s Black Hawk War, Red Cloud’s War, Franklin County War, U.S. invades Mexico, Conflict with China

1867 – Texas-Indian Wars, Long Walk of the Navajo, Apache Wars, Skirmish between 1st Cavalry and Indians, Snake War, Utah’s Black Hawk War, Red Cloud’s War, Comanche Wars, Franklin County War, U.S. troops occupy Nicaragua and attack Taiwan

1868 – Texas-Indian Wars, Long Walk of the Navajo, Apache Wars, Skirmish between 1st Cavalry and Indians, Snake War, Utah’s Black Hawk War, Red Cloud’s War, Comanche Wars, Battle of Washita River, Franklin County War

1869 – Texas-Indian Wars, Apache Wars, Skirmish between 1st Cavalry and Indians, Utah’s Black Hawk War, Comanche Wars, Franklin County War

1870 – Texas-Indian Wars, Apache Wars, Skirmish between 1st Cavalry and Indians, Utah’s Black Hawk War, Comanche Wars, Franklin County War

1871 – Texas-Indian Wars, Apache Wars, Skirmish between 1st Cavalry and Indians, Utah’s Black Hawk War, Comanche Wars, Franklin County War, Kingsley Cave Massacre, U.S. forces invade Korea

1872 – Texas-Indian Wars, Apache Wars, Utah’s Black Hawk War, Comanche Wars, Modoc War, Franklin County War

1873 – Texas-Indian Wars, Comanche Wars, Modoc War, Apache Wars, Cypress Hills Massacre, U.S. forces invade Mexico

1874 – Texas-Indian Wars, Comanche Wars, Red River War, Mason County War, U.S. forces invade Mexico

1875 – Conflict in Mexico, Texas-Indian Wars, Comanche Wars, Eastern Nevada, Mason County War, Colfax County War, U.S. forces invade Mexico

1876 – Texas-Indian Wars, Black Hills War, Mason County War, U.S. forces invade Mexico

1877 – Texas-Indian Wars, Skirmish between 1st Cavalry and Indians, Black Hills War, Nez Perce War, Mason County War, Lincoln County War, San Elizario Salt War, U.S. forces invade Mexico

1878 – Paiute Indian conflict, Bannock War, Cheyenne War, Lincoln County War, U.S. forces invade Mexico

1879 – Cheyenne War, Sheepeater Indian War, White River War, U.S. forces invade Mexico

1880 – U.S. forces invade Mexico

1881 – U.S. forces invade Mexico

1882 – U.S. forces invade Mexico

1883 – U.S. forces invade Mexico

1884 – U.S. forces invade Mexico

1885 – Apache Wars, Eastern Nevada Expedition, U.S. forces invade Mexico

1886 – Apache Wars, Pleasant Valley War, U.S. forces invade Mexico

1887 – U.S. forces invade Mexico

1888 – U.S. show of force against Haiti, U.S. forces invade Mexico

1889 – U.S. forces invade Mexico

1890 – Sioux Indian War, Skirmish between 1st Cavalry and Indians, Ghost Dance War, Wounded Knee, U.S. forces invade Mexico

1891 – Sioux Indian War, Ghost Dance War, U.S. forces invade Mexico

1892 – Johnson County War, U.S. forces invade Mexico

1893 – U.S. forces invade Mexico and Hawaii

1894 – U.S. forces invade Mexico

1895 – U.S. forces invade Mexico, Bannock Indian Disturbances

1896 – U.S. forces invade Mexico

1897 – No major war

1898 – Spanish-American War, Battle of Leech Lake, Chippewa Indian Disturbances

1899 – Philippine-American War, Banana Wars

1900 – Philippine-American War, Banana Wars

1901 – Philippine-American War, Banana Wars

1902 – Philippine-American War, Banana Wars

1903 – Philippine-American War, Banana Wars

1904 – Philippine-American War, Banana Wars

1905 – Philippine-American War, Banana Wars

1906 – Philippine-American War, Banana Wars

1907 – Philippine-American War, Banana Wars

1908 – Philippine-American War, Banana Wars

1909 – Philippine-American War, Banana Wars

1910 – Philippine-American War, Banana Wars

1911 – Philippine-American War, Banana Wars

1912 – Philippine-American War, Banana Wars

1913 – Philippine-American War, Banana Wars, New Mexico Navajo War

1914 – Banana Wars, U.S. invades Mexico

1915 – Banana Wars, U.S. invades Mexico, Colorado Paiute War

1916 – Banana Wars, U.S. invades Mexico

1917 – Banana Wars, World War I, U.S. invades Mexico

1918 – Banana Wars, World War I, U.S invades Mexico

1919 – Banana Wars, U.S. invades Mexico

1920 – Banana Wars

1921 – Banana Wars

1922 – Banana Wars

1923 – Banana Wars, Posey War

Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery1924 – Banana Wars

1925 – Banana Wars

1926 – Banana Wars

1927 – Banana Wars

1928 – Banana Wars

1930 – Banana Wars

1931 – Banana Wars

1932 – Banana Wars

1933 – Banana Wars

1934 – Banana Wars

1935 – No major war

1936 – No major war

1937 – No major war

1938 – No major war

1939 – No major war

1940 – No major war

1941 – World War II

1942 – World War II

1943 – Wold War II

1944 – World War II

1945 – World War II

1946 – Cold War (U.S. occupies the Philippines and South Korea)

1947 – Cold War (U.S. occupies South Korea, U.S. forces land in Greece to fight Communists)

1948 – Cold War (U.S. forces aid Chinese Nationalist Party against Communists)

1949 – Cold War (U.S. forces aid Chinese Nationalist Party against Communists)

1950 – Korean War, Jayuga Uprising

1951 – Korean War

1952 – Korean War

1953 – Korean War

1954 – Covert War in Guatemala

1955 – Vietnam War

1956 – Vietnam War

1957 – Vietnam War

1958 – Vietnam War

1959 – Vietnam War, Conflict in Haiti

1960 – Vietam War

1961 – Vietnam War

1962 – Vietnam War, Cold War (Cuban Missile Crisis; U.S. marines fight Communists in Thailand)

1963 – Vietnam War

1964 – Vietnam War

1965 – Vietnam War, U.S. occupation of Dominican Republic

1966 – Vietnam War, U.S. occupation of Dominican Republic

1967 – Vietnam War

1968 – Vietnam War

1969 – Vietnam War

1970 – Vietnam War

1971 – Vietnam War

1972 – Vietnam War

1973 – Vietnam War, U.S. aids Israel in Yom Kippur War

1974 – Vietnam War

1975 – Vietnam War

1976 – No major war

1977 – No major war

1978 – No major war

1979 – Cold War (CIA proxy war in Afghanistan)

1980 – Cold War (CIA proxy war in Afghanistan)

1981 – Cold War (CIA proxy war in Afghanistan and Nicaragua), First Gulf of Sidra Incident

1982 – Cold War (CIA proxy war in Afghanistan and Nicaragua), Conflict in Lebanon

1983 – Cold War (Invasion of Grenada, CIA proxy war in Afghanistan and Nicaragua), Conflict in Lebanon

1984 – Cold War (CIA proxy war in Afghanistan and Nicaragua), Conflict in Persian Gulf

1985 – Cold War (CIA proxy war in Afghanistan and Nicaragua)

1986 – Cold War (CIA proxy war in Afghanistan and Nicaragua)

1987 – Conflict in Persian Gulf

1988 – Conflict in Persian Gulf, U.S. occupation of Panama

1989 – Second Gulf of Sidra Incident, U.S. occupation of anama, Conflict in Philippines

1990 – First Gulf War, U.S. occupation of Panama

1991 – First Gulf War

1992 – Conflict in Iraq

1993 – Conflict in Iraq

1994 – Conflict in Iraq, U.S. invades Haiti

1995 – Conflict in Iraq, U.S. invades Haiti, NATO bombing of Bosnia and Herzegovina

1996 – Conflict in Iraq

1997 – No major war

1998 – Bombing of Iraq, Missile strikes against Afghanistan and Sudan

1999 – Kosovo War

2000 – No major war

2001 – War on Terror in Afghanistan

2002 – War on Terror in Afghanistan and Yemen

2003 – War on Terror in Afghanistan, and Iraq

2004 – War on Terror in Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, and Yemen

2005 – War on Terror in Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, and Yemen

2006 – War on Terror in Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, and Yemen

2007 – War on Terror in Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, Somalia, and Yemen

2008 – War on Terror in Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, and Yemen

2009 – War on Terror in Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, and Yemen

2010 – War on Terror in Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, and Yemen

2011 – War on Terror in Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, Somalia, and Yemen; Conflict in Libya (Libyan Civil War)

2012 – War on Terror in Afghanistan, Iraq, Somalia, Syria and Yemen

2013 – War on Terror in Afghanistan, Iraq, Somalia, Syria and Yemen

2014 – War on Terror in Afghanistan, Iraq, Somalia, Syria and Yemen; Civil War in Ukraine

2015 – War on Terror in Somalia, Somalia, Syria and Yemen; Civil War in Ukraine

My dad was an Air Force pilot during the Korean War, 1950-1953, so I always have had a little military sentimentality on Memorial Day.

After reading that list of wars (source: WashingtonsBlog), it is obvious that there really is, in the words of President Dwight D. Eisenhower (1890-1969), a “military-industrial complex.”

Perhaps the military isn’t so much about protecting the United States, its freedoms, and its way of life as it is simply a job.

So maybe all of those politicians who keep the United States involved in wars throughout the world simply are helping create jobs, especially since the great majority of military personnel are ages 18-25.

Hmmmmm. Food for thought….

In the future,

Honoring veterans in the future

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Music on Mondays (5-18-15)—My mission, should I choose to accept it

The Music Chronicles of Russel Ray

After yesterday’s post about trash, I wondered if there were any protest songs about the immense trash created by over 7½ billion people on a planet comprising 317 million square miles, of which only 92½ million square miles is land to live on.

I thought that if anyone had a trash protest song out, it would be Neil Young, possibly the greatest songwriter protestor in the history of the world.

I didn’t find any trash protest songs but I admit that I didn’t look very hard because I found a pretty cool song titled “Trash” by the British group Suede. I am unfamiliar with Suede but will endeavor to check out more of their music this week.

Here’s “Trash” to listen to while you read the lyrics and more about Suede and this song:

Maybe, maybe it’s the clothes we wear,
The tasteless bracelets and the dye in our hair,
Maybe it’s our kookiness,
Or maybe, maybe it’s our nowhere towns,
Our nothing places and our cellophane sounds,
Maybe it’s our looseness,

But we’re trash, you and me,
We’re the litter on the breeze,
We’re the lovers on the streets,
Just trash, me and you,
It’s in everything we do,
It’s in everything we do…

Maybe, maybe it’s the things we say,
The words we’ve heard and the music we play,
Maybe it’s our cheapness,
Or maybe, maybe it’s the times we’ve had,
The lazy days and the crazes and the fads,
Maybe it’s our sweetness,

But we’re trash, you and me,
We’re the litter on the breeze,
We’re the lovers on the street,
Just trash, me and you,
It’s in everything we do,
It’s in everything we do…

Obviously the song is about people known as “white trash” here in the United States. According to Wikipedia,

White trash is a derogatory American English term referring to poor white people, especially in the rural South of the United States, suggesting lower social class and degraded standards of living. The term suggests outcasts from respectable society living on the fringes of the social order, who are seen as dangerous because they may be criminal, unpredictable, and without respect for authority whether it be political, legal, or moral. The term is usually a slur, but may also be used self-referentially by working-class whites to jokingly describe their origins or lifestyle.

Interesting.

Suede formed in 1989 and had their greatest success from 1989 to around mid-1997. That explains why I am unfamiliar with them. The period from 1985 to 1995 is my lost decade. I was in such a state of mental shambles that music wasn’t a big part of my life. It has only been since 2012 that I have endeavored to catch up on that decade in music.

“Trash” was the first track on Suede’s third album, “Coming Up,” released in 1996. It is their biggest selling single, making it to #3 on the British charts and hitting #1 in Finland.

Suede reformed in 2010. Since they only have six studio albums, my mission, should I choose to accept it—and I do!—is to listen to all six of them this week. Since I listen to an average of 11 hours of music each day, it shouldn’t be hard for me to listen to Suede’s complete studio discography this week.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

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Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

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