Category Archives: Home inspections

Stairs

House & Home—Walk this way

House & Home

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

One of the reasons why I continue to add plug-ins to Photoshop is because I have a lot of older photos that are bad because they were taken with little point & shoots, usually at home inspections where I didn’t need great clarity, contrast, etc. I like them but have no creative idea of what to do with them. Many of the plug-ins can give me ideas.

Following are three pictures of walkways—two exterior stairs and one path. All three of these create trip hazards, a major cause of accident and injury around our homes. That was why I took a picture of them to begin with, to warn my Clients about trip hazards. Even if they were not trip hazards in and of themselves, whenever you’re somewhere unfamiliar, such as a new home you just bought, you will fine trip hazards as you become accustomed to that home.

Stairs

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Stairs

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Path

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

These three pictures specifically illustrate poor construction of the stairs and paths. As a disclaimer, I’ll say that I like unique and unusual just as much as the next person, but when it comes to finding and using trip hazards, I’m a poster boy.

The two stairways are uneven in their vertical rise or their horizontal run, sometimes both, as well as their width. If you pay attention to how you walk, you’ll find that you don’t look down at each and every step once you get an overall view of what you’re going to be doing. You simply walk. When the rise and run is inconsistent, or each step has a different width, you either have to continue to look down and risk running into something else (bushes), or you have to pay attention to where you’re going, instead of how you’re going, and risk tripping.

The path creates a trip hazard because of how Mother and Father Nature built the human body. You don’t walk by placing one foot directly in front of another, so a straight path like that creates trip hazards. If you create a path out of stepping stones, stagger them off center so that one can walk naturally on them. Every other one should be placed left of center, for the left foot, and all others right of center, for the right foot:

Correct path

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

A pathway constructed of stepping stones, gravel, bark, and other loose landscaping materials will never be even, so you still have to be extraordinarily careful. If you like that kind of landscaping, install landscape lighting in case you have to walk that way in the dark. Also, before you build it, walk the path you’re going to build. Wear shoes that have a good sole pattern so you can see exactly where your feet land during your normal walking pace. Place large stepping stones where your footprints are.

Because these three pictures illustrate doom, I went looking for a filter that could take a bad picture and make it look doomy. In this case, I used filters in the Topaz plug-in.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

Looking for real estate services in San Diego County?
I can highly recommend
James Frimmer, Realtor
Century 21 Award, BRE #01458572

If you’re looking for a home inspector,
I recommend Russel Ray — that’s me!Real Estate Solutions

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

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Tree roots

Plant trees strategically to help with heating and cooling costs

House & Home

Texas A&M UniversityWhen I was studying at Texas A&M University in the mid-1970s for my Bachelor of Science degree in Forestry, I took a course in Urban Forestry. My team project was to evaluate trees in Houston, Texas, to determine their value to residential properties. We determined that they could add up to 25% to the value of real estate. We also determined that dead, dying, or poorly placed trees could decrease the value by up to 11%. What we didn’t evaluate but which is widely known now, 40+ years later, is that by planting trees strategically, one can:

  • House atticreduce heating and cooling costs by up to twenty percent
  • reduce attic temperatures by 20-40 degrees
  • create wind barriers to help prevent wind damage to the home
  • trap and absorb pollutants such as dush, ash, pollen, and smoke
  • remove carbon from the atmosphere to help control greenhouse gases and global warming
  • release oxygen into the atmosphere so we can breathe
  • trap and hold water from storms
  • reduce soil erosion

SweetgumHere in San Diego, a desert Mediterranean environment, trees can provide much needed shade and, with its color, flowers, and fruit, can simply make us feel good on a hot summer day or a cold winter day.

To make the best use of trees on your residential property, certain tree types should be planted in certain areas to take into account how the sun shines on your property during the year.

Plant deciduous trees on the south, southeast, and southwest sides of your home. Deciduous trees lose their leaves each fall, so during the summer they provide shade to help cool your home, and in the winter they let sun shine through their bare branches to help heat your home.

Cooling compressorIf you have an air conditioning compressor (sometimes called a “condenser” or simply an “air conditioner”) outside, planting trees to provide shade for them will help them run more efficiently. However, be sure to keep the compressor clear of foliage and debris, and do not block airflow into the compressor.

Concrete and asphalt walkways, driveways, and streets cause a urban heat island effect. By planting trees to shade your walkways and driveway, you can help counteract that tendency not only around your home but in your neighborhood and city.

To get the most benefit from trees around your home, plant small trees within 15 feet, medium trees within 35 feet, and large trees within 50 feet. Be sure to space trees well away from your home’s foundation and other hardscape to prevent root damage, and to keep them away from utility lines, both above ground wires and below ground water and sewer.

Tree rootsBefore you plant any tree, though, find out how tall and high wide the tree will be at maturity. That cute little Ficus you got at the grocery store for Christmas or Valentine’s Day can grow to be 50′ high and 135′ wide with destructive above-ground roots, so you don’t want to be planting it at the front door or near the swimming pool when it gets too big for the house.

Staring up at a eucalyptusTrees such as the eucalyptus, with their shallow roots and brittle branches, should not be planted anywhere on your property unless you have several acres and can plant them at the far end of your property, away from structures and utilities. Rain and wind will break the branches and sometimes topple the tree, so if your home or car is anywhere near, you could be looking at lots of damage.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

This post approved byThis post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Looking for real estate services in San Diego County?
I can highly recommend
James Frimmer, Realtor
Century 21 Award, BRE #01458572

If you’re looking for a home inspector,
I recommend Russel Ray — that’s me!Real Estate Solutions

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Sink cabinets are not for storing chemicals

What does your sink cabinet look like?

House & Home

Did you notice that I have a new “House & Home” category on my main menu? I want to stay with this category one more day and then we’ll return to an eclectic mix of eclectic posts about eclectic Southern California.

One of the most common problems I find during the course of a home inspection is the leak under the kitchen/bathroom/laundry/wet bar sink. Think about what’s in your sink cabinets: the underside of metal sinks, garbage disposals with metal casings, copper water supply pipes, and plastic or metal drainage pipes. Invariably the sink cabinet looks like this:

Sink cabinets are not for storing chemicals

Sink cabinets are not for storing chemicals

Sink cabinets are not for storing chemicals

Sink cabinets are not for storing chemicals

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Do you see what’s common in those four pictures? I’ll give you a second.

Second’s up.

Chemicals. Paints. Cleaners. Dissolvers. Detergents. Insecticides….

Sink cabinets are the wrong place to store that kind of stuff because, by their very nature, they are corrosive. Both plastic and metal are affected by corrosive chemicals, and continued corrosion and rusting of your metal and plastic plumbing, or the sink and garbage disposal, can eventually result in leaks.

Even when you think you have the cap screwed on tight, little corrosive atoms are escaping and attaching to anything and everything in your sink cabinet. And who ever tries to put the tape thingy back on a can of Ajax or Comet? No one. Corrosive, corrosive, corrosive.

Additionally, children could get to them, possibly resulting in injury or death. Who started this bad habit of storing dangerous chemicals in sink cabinets?

And no one ever takes all those chemicals out of the sink cabinets to inspect the cabinet floor and the water and drainage pipes — unless they’re moving, water is pouring out of the sink cabinet onto the floor, or a young child is in the hospital after gaining access to the chemicals.

It’s easy to check your sink plumbing on a daily basis with little effort on your part. Here’s how: Store unopened bottles and cans, and dry materials such as towels, bathroom tissue, and boxes, in sink cabinets, like this:

Good sink cabinet storage

Good sink cabinet storage

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Notice that those two pictures have dry materials in the sink cabinets. If normally dry materials are wet when you remove them from under the sink, you know that you have a leak of some type. Remove whatever is in the sink cabinet and check for leaks in the water pipes and drain pipes, and check for deteriorated caulking/grouting around the sink and countertop. Have a licensed plumber repair or replace any plumbing components, and have the deteriorated caulking/grouting repaired.

The best places to store household cleaning chemicals are in cabinets that are out of the reach of young children in the garage or at an exterior location. If you have to keep them inside, an upper hallway closet, the cabinet above the microwave oven, or the cabinet above the refrigerator make good interior locations. If it means that you have to go buy a step ladder to get the chemicals each time you need them, I think that small inconvenience is far better than the “inconvenience” of going to a funeral for a dead child or visiting an injured child in the hospital for several days. I hope you agree.

Regardless of where you store the chemicals, make sure the container cover is tightly closed and secured so that it doesn’t spill if you accidentally knock it over or drop it.

If you keep chemicals in lower cabinets or drawers — and you shouldn’t — make sure those cabinets and drawers have child-proof latches on them if you have any children — yours, other family, friends, or co-workers — or pets in the house at any time.

One last advantage of keeping dry materials, especially towels, in the sink cabinets is that one day you might open the cabinet door and find something like this:

Happy cat!

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

I'm Zoey the Cool Cat, and I approve this post

Looking for real estate services in San Diego County?
I can highly recommend
James Frimmer, Realtor
Century 21 Award, DRE #01458572

If you’re looking for a home inspector,
I recommend Russel Ray — that’s me!Real Estate Solutions

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Mountain home in Alpine, California

Eleven thousand and counting

House & Home

Since I started my home inspection company on October 15, 2001, my employees (nine at the height of the real estate boom in 2006) and I have done over 11,000 home inspections.

They have ranged from the cute little 360-square-feet studio in Point Loma (popular with flight attendants and pilots who just need a place to sleep over) to the 16,000-square-feet mansion in Rancho Santa Fe, one of the nation’s most prestigious zip codes (if prestige means really really really expensive homes). My Clients have included movie stars, sports stars, recording stars, business executives, and even regular people like you and me!

Today I thought I’d show you some of my favorite homes that I’ve inspected over these past twelve years.

Possibly my favorite is this mountain home in the old gold-mining community of Julian. It was built in 1937, was being sold by the man who built the home (he was 93 at the time), and still had its original octopus oil-fired furnace, which had been serviced the day before I was there. It is called an octopus furnace because the air ducts come out of a central body and spread throughout the house like an octopus.

House in Julian, California

1937 oil-burning octopus furnace

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

A few of my other favorite homes that I’ve inspected:

San Diego canyon homeSan Diego canyon home

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Hacienda in Bonita, CaliforniaHacienda in Bonita, California

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Mountain home in Alpine, CaliforniaHouse in Alpine, California

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Point Loma home, San DiegoHouse in Point Loma, San Diego, California

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Mountain home in Alpine, CaliforniaMountain home in Alpine, California

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

House in 4S Ranch, San DiegoHouse in 4S Ranch, San Diego

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Blossom Valley home, Lakeside, CaliforniaBlossom Valley home, Lakeside, California

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Mount Woodson Golf Club home, Ramona, CaliforniaMount Woodson home, Ramona, California

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Blossom Valley home, Lakeside, CaliforniaBlossom Valley home, Lakeside, California

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Mount Helix home, Spring Valley, CaliforniaMount Helix home, Spring Valley, California

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Mountain log home in Julian, CaliforniaMountain log home in Julian, California

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Valley Center, CaliforniaValley Center, California

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Adobe home in San Diego Country Estates, Ramona, CaliforniaAdobe home in San Diego Country Estates, Ramona, California

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

San Diego, CaliforniaSan Diego, California

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Mountain home in Alpine, CaliforniaMountain home in Alpine, California

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

If I were not a home inspector, I would never have had the opportunity to visit such magnificent homes. I did live in a magnificent home of 4,000 square feet from June 25, 1999, to June 25, 2001. I might still be living there except that in June 2000 my San Diego Gas & Electric bill was $4,700. Yes, I had, and used, a 10,000 gallon spa and a 50,000-gallon heated swimming pool, as well as two acres of lighted and irrigated landscaping, but when I moved in the monthly utility bill was only $600.

A year later the Enron Corporation, out of Houston, Texas, was manipulating the energy markets west of the Mississippi. It wasn’t until six months after I sold the home — I couldn’t see myself paying $4,700 a month for gas and electric for the rest of my life — that Enron filed for bankruptcy on December 2, 2001, and their elaborate institutionalized, systematic, and creatively planned accounting fraud and energy markets manipulation became public.

In retrospect, I believe that houses can be too big to live in. There were two of us living in that huge 4,000-SF house. I think 1,000 square feet per adult, and 500 square feet per child, is quite adequate for all except the exceptionally egocentric, like some of these sports, movie, and recording stars.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

I'm Zoey the Cool Cat, and I approve this post

Looking for real estate services in San Diego County?
I can highly recommend
James Frimmer, Realtor
Century 21 Award, DRE #01458572

If you’re looking for a home inspector,
I recommend Russel Ray — that’s me!Real Estate Solutions

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Overusing extension cords

Have you created a fire waiting to happen?

House & Home

Didja miss me?

Rarely do I not get to post something each day, but to go three days without a post? Well, mark that on your calendar!

Most of the houses I inspect are in the range from 600-SF condos to 2,000-SF houses. They usually take 2-3 hours to inspect and another hour or so to compile a report. If there’s a good movie on, or I’m singing to The Beatles, compiling the report could take four or five hours……..lol

This past weekend was “Big House Weekend” for me. On Friday I inspected a 4,000-SF house, then a 2,200-SF house on Saturday, and then a 4,600-SF house in La Jolla with a 180-degree view of the ocean on Sunday. Too bad I don’t get to charge money to inspect views; just have to enjoy them while I do my job.

At Saturday’s inspection, which was a three-story hillside home in La Mesa, we were able to see the smoke from a fire a couple of miles away. Later I found out the location of the fire and that people and two dogs had to be rescued from the back yard as the house was burning; unfortunately, two inside cats lost their lives due to smoke inhalation. It took firefighters and engines from four cities to knock down the fire in 20 minutes, but there still was $300,000 in property damage and the loss of our two feline friends.

At the same time, a story hit the Internet about a fire in Orofino, Idaho, that took the lives of five people. We don’t yet know the cause of the fire in La Mesa, but the Orofino fire was blamed on an overloaded extension cord.

Invariably in my inspection reports, I always note that the seller is using outlet multipliers and extension cords as permanent wiring. Outlet multipliers are used to turn a two-receptacle outlet into a four- or six-receptacle outlet, like this:

Outlet multiplier

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Overuse of extension cords looks like this:

Overusing extension cords

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Using outlet multipliers and extension cords as permanent wiring is a major cause of fires in our homes. They encourage you to plug in more stuff for which you probably don’t have enough electricity on the circuit. In many cases, the extension cord itself is not heavy duty enough to handle the extra load, which is what happened at the house in Orofino, Idaho.

Just because something is sold at Home Depot or Walmart does not mean that it is safe to use in any way you choose. Both of the devices discussed here should only be used temporarily, and once you are finished with it, you should unplug it. While you are using it, though, feel the cord or the multiplier every five or ten minutes. If it is hot to the touch, turn everything off and unplug it before you have a fire.

Even though you might not want to pay an electrician to install additional outlets, circuits, and circuit breakers, it’s the safest thing to do. After all, would you rather pay your electrician $500 on a credit card or pay the various expenses related to moving into a hotel for several months while your burned-down house is rebuilt? I can tell you that the electrician is the less expensive and less inconvenient way to go.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

I'm Zoey the Cool Cat, and I approve this post

Looking for real estate services in San Diego County?
I can highly recommend
James Frimmer, Realtor
Century 21 Award, DRE #01458572

If you’re looking for a home inspector,
I recommend Russel Ray — that’s me!Real Estate Solutions

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Dead tree in the boondocks

Scenes from……………the boondocks

Out & About

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

My home inspection yesterday was out in the boondocks, and not just any boondocks. These were boondocks I had never been in before. Enjoy.

San Vicente Avenue, the main “street” into the subdivision.
(Avenue? This wasn’t looking good for the city boy.)Main street to the boondocks

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Poor tree (but nice picture!)Dead tree in the boondocks

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Photogenic birds in the boondocksBird in the boondocks

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Front lawn ornaments were different from in the city Front lawn ornament in the boondocks

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Historic home in the boondocks
(love the fire hydrant on the corner)Historic home in the boondocks

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Rocky Lane — the street where I would be doing the home inspection
(this city boy has a different visual for “Lane”)Street in the boondocks

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Grandpa’s backyard chair at sunriseBackyard sunrise in the boondocks

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Boondocks pets were larger than city petsPets in the boondocks

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Swimming pools were a little different
(this was a community pool shared by six families)Community swimming pool in the boondocks

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Toys from four generations
(Not a computer or television anywhere!)Toys from four generations

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Street addresses were differentStreet address in the boondocks

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

A boondocks kitchen
(just like my wise old grandmother had;
yes, originally I am from the boondocks, in Texas) Kitchen from the boondocks

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

One of Grandpa’s farming implementsGrandpa's farming implement from the boondocks

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Lastly, if your house burned in the October 2003 Cedar Fire, be sure to rebuild a bigger and badder house, even if you’re already on top of the mountain. That will teach Mother and Father Nature a thing or two! Ha!

Big, bad house in the boondocks

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

The boondocks map
(It looks like a nice subdivision on the map! Ha!
The only paved road is in yellow in the lower left corner.)Map of the boondocks
View Larger Map

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

Looking for real estate services in San Diego County?
I can highly recommend
James Frimmer, Realtor
Century 21 Award, DRE #01458572

If you’re looking for a home inspector,
I recommend Russel Ray — that’s me!Real Estate Solutions

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Custom downspout

It’s the uniquest I’ve ever seen

Snippets

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Seven years ago I did a home inspection for a young couple buying their first home. It was a fixer upper but at a good price, and they were willing to put in the work to earn sweat equity.

Recently the owners called me to come do a maintenance inspection, which is where I check to make sure things are still in good working order, still operating as intended, etc.

One of the items that regularly shows up in my home inspection reports is the lack of rain gutters and downspouts, and part of my verbiage on those downspouts is to make sure they terminate away from the foundation, at least three feet and preferably at least six feet.

The owner was quite proud to show me his custom downspout terminations, looking like aquaducts coursing through his xeriscape landscaping:

Custom downspout

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Custom downspout

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

The aquaduct carried the water all the way to the street curb. The owner said, “I don’t want any erosion on my property.” I thought it was pretty cool, definitely the uniquest (uniquest?) I have ever seen to get water through landscaping and off the property.

I don’t keep documents for more than the legally required 5½ years, and I don’t keep pictures at all if they are kind of blasé, so I don’t have before and after pictures. Drat.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

I'm Zoey the Cool Cat, and I approve this post

Looking for real estate services in San Diego County?
I can highly recommend
James Frimmer, Realtor
Century 21 Award, DRE #01458572

If you’re looking for a home inspector,
I recommend Russel Ray — that’s me!Real Estate Solutions

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Garden turtle

The week in review (7-23-12 to 7-29-12)

Out & About

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Some of my favorite pictures from this past week.

The house I inspected on Monday is under the tent on Friday:

Tented house

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Sometimes fine, furry, four-legged friends welcome me to home inspections, not always with a welcoming smile:

Fine, furry, four-legged friend

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Early fall colors:

Early fall colors

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Rope swing in a park near the house shown in the first picture (brought back childhood memories):

Rope swing

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

The view from one of the homes I inspected this past week:

Sweetwater Reservoir

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

A home that I did not inspect, other than admiring the green roof:

Hobbit House

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Best water fountain of the week:

Water fountain

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Best garden sculpture:

Garden sculpture

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Best garden animal:

Garden turtle

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Best picture from the San Diego Zoo Safari Park, two mule deer fawns looking for their mom:

Mule deer fawn

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Time to go:

Time to go

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

I'm Zoey the Cool Cat, and I approve this post

Looking for real estate services in San Diego County?
I can highly recommend
James Frimmer, Realtor
Century 21 Award, DRE #01458572

If you’re looking for a home inspector,
I recommend Russel Ray — that’s me!Real Estate Solutions

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Roof pigs

This little piggy went to market…. or did he?

Picture of the moment
PICTURE OF THE MOMENT

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

As a home inspector, I do a lot of traveling. I’m always on the lookout for interesting houses and neighborhoods, like the roof on this house:

Roof pigs

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Reminds me of the nursery rhyme, “This Little Piggy.”

This little piggy went to market.
This little piggy stayed home.
This little piggy had roast beef.
This little piggy had none.
And this little piggy went wee wee wee all the way home (and then climbed up on the roof with all the other piggies that had been punished for making so much noise on the way home).

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

I'm Zoey the Cool Cat, and I approve this post

Looking for real estate services in San Diego County?
I can highly recommend
James Frimmer, Realtor
Century 21 Award, DRE #01458572

If you’re looking for a home inspector,
I recommend Russel Ray — that’s me!Real Estate Solutions

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Roof adornments

Roof adornments for most guys and lesbians (hey, we don’t discriminate here!)

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Picture of the moment
PICTURE OF THE MOMENT

 

When I was growing up my wise old grandmother used to tell me, “April showers bring May flowers.” That might be true for Kingsville, Texas. Here in San Diego, however, December showers bring January, February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, and November flowers.

Sometimes things don’t work out quite right. I don’t know what the rainfall total here was for April 2012, but it was the wettest I can remember in the eighteen years I’ve been here.

Those April showers didn’t do anything for our May Gray, a time when the marine layer of clouds hangs over the County sometimes well into the afternoon. Same with June, except we call it June Gloom.

I was over on the campus of San Diego State University this afternoon as the sun came out. Being the good home inspector I am, I’m always looking around for interesting homes that I can take pictures of to use in my real estate blog.

Over on the edge of campus, where most of the sorority and fraternity houses are, I saw the following roof adornments and just had to take a couple of pictures:

Roof adornments

 

Roof adornments

 

As a home inspector, I cannot condone getting on your roof unless it was designed for that purpose, as some roofs in our beach communities are in order to take advantage of the ocean views.

I also noticed as I took my two pictures that lots of other folks were taking pictures too. Probably for posterity to show how hard they studied in college. :)

 

This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Looking for real estate services in San Diego County? I can highly recommend
James Frimmer, Realtor with Century 21 Award, DRE #01458572

If you’re just looking for a home inspector,
I can highly recommend Russel Ray; that’s me!