Category Archives: History

Music on Mondays (12-21-15)—Rise & shine, rinse & repeat

The Music Chronicles of Russel Ray

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

This being the first Christmas since 2001 that I have had a new job that requires at least 40 hours of my time each week, I thought we’d explore songs about work.

Everyone probably knows Johnny Paycheck’s 1977 hit, “Take This Job & Shove It,” a sentiment that definitely does not apply to my new job working with Amazon.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Huey Lewis & The News is one of my favorite groups from the ’80s. Here’s a minor hit from 1982:

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Dolly Parton’s “9 to 5” hit the top of the Billboard Hot 100 chart in November 1980.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Tennessee Ernie Ford had a hit the year I was born, 1955, with “Sixteen Tons.” I sang this song in the school talent show when I was in seventh grade.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Best guitar solo in a working man’s song goes to Aleksandar Živojinović, better known as Alex Lifeson, of Rush in a song titled, coincidentally, “Working Man.”

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

A good song about what to do after work: “It’s Five O’clock Somewhere” by Alan Jackson and Jimmy Buffett.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

“Five O’clock World” by The Vogues, released in 1966, probably is the first time that I can remember hearing the phrase “it’s five o’clock” and understanding what it meant.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Perhaps my favorite of all the songs I considered for this post is Bachman-Turner Overdrive’s “Taking Care of Business” from 1974. Rise & shine, rinse & repeat, day after day after day….

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Need a unique gift for a Christmas or other special occasion?

Use code YLNNRX for a $40 discount on
Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos at Fine Art America

Photographic Art logo

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

 I'm Zoey the Cool Cat, and I approve this post

The Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, California

Out & About

Many decades ago my mom took us kids down to the courthouse to get the latest polio vaccine. I remember it well because it didn’t involve a needle. In fact, the vaccine came via a sugar cube, and as an 8-year-old child, the lack of needles and someone giving me a sugar cube was pretty cool.

What we had received was an oral polio vaccine developed by Albert Sabin in the late 1950s. It underwent human trials in 1957, was selected by the U.S. National Institute of Health as the polio vaccine of preference, and licensed in 1962.

The first widely available polio vaccine, an “inactivated poliovirus vaccine,” was developed in 1952 by Jonas Salk while at the University of Pittsburgh. After two doses, 90% of the people develop protective antibodies to all three types of poliovirus. After three doses, that increases to 99%. Sadly, it is given by injection, which involves needles…….

In 1960, Salk founded the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, California, a suburban neighborhood of the City of San Diego, about 20 miles north of downtown San Diego.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

The Salk Institute is an international center for medical and scientific research. Architects and those who know architecture rave about the Salk Institute campus. Personally, I find the architecture dull, boring, and uninteresting, verging on flat-out ugly. But what do I know?

Here are some pictures of the Salk Institute campus:

img_3091 salk institute stamp img_3087 salk institute stamp img_3078 salk institute stamp img_3097 salk institute stamp img_3095 salk institute stampPictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

The Salk Institute consistently ranks among the top institutions in the United States in terms of research output and quality in the life sciences. In 2004, the Times Higher Education Supplement ranked Salk as the world’s top biomedicine research institute, and in 2009 it was ranked number one globally by ScienceWatch in the neuroscience and behavior areas.

The institute employs 850 researchers in 60 research groups and focuses its research in molecular biology and genetics, neurosciences, and plant biology.

The campus was designed by Louis Kahn. According to Wikipedia sources, “Kahn created a style that was monumental and monolithic; his heavy buildings for the most part do not hide their weight, their materials, or the way they are assembled. Louis Kahn’s works are considered as monumental beyond modernism. Famous for his meticulously built works, his provocative proposals that remained unbuilt, and his teaching, Kahn was one of the most influential architects of the twentieth century.” Suffice to say that he and his style are not among my favorites.

The original buildings of the Salk Institute were designated as a historical landmark in 1991. The entire 27-acre site was deemed eligible by the California Historical Resources Commission in 2006 for listing on the National Register of Historic Places.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Salk’s personal papers are stored at the Theodore Geisel Library at the University of California, San Diego. You might recognize the name of Theodore Geisel as that of Dr. Seuss. Geisel’s personal papers also are stored at the Library.

The Geisel Library is what I consider beautiful architecture:

Geisel Library at the University of California San DiegoPictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

(More on the Geisel Library can be found here: The Geisel Library at the University of California San Diego.)

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Need a unique gift for a Christmas or other special occasion?

Use code YLNNRX for a $40 discount on
Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos at Fine Art America

Photographic Art logo

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

I'm Zoey the Cool Cat, and I approve this post

Music on Mondays (11-30-15)—Smart man….

The Music Chronicles of Russel Ray

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

As I listen to music in my collection, certain songs remind me of certain people from my past. I thought it would be interesting to feature some of those songs for today’s Music on Mondays.

“Help” by The Beatles, released in 1965, reminds me of Barbara.

I met Barbara at the Thomas D. Dee Memorial Hospital in late 1965 when I had been placed in their “troubled youth” program. Barbara was from Bakersfield, California, also a troubled youth. She was near 18 whereas I was 10. She introduced me to The Beatles, and “Help” was my favorite song. Still is near the top of my list of favorite Beatles songs.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

“Something’s Wrong With Me” by Austin Roberts was a hit in October 1972. Reminds me of Mark.

Mark was the first guy that I had a crush on. I as 17 and supposed to be interested in girls. Wasn’t working. Something was wrong with me….

Mark worked at the Exxon station across from the railroad yards, and since my granddad worked on the railroad, I had no problem hanging around the railroad to watch Mark across the street. I went to Mark’s wedding in 1984 or so…. a bittersweet event.

It took until 1993 before I realized that absolutely nothing was wrong with me. I simply had different interests….

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

“Pieces Of April” by Three Dog Night was a big hit in November 1972.

“Pieces Of April” reminds me of Sarita, one of my closest female friends from high school. She lived not far from me whereas Mark lived on the other side of town. One day Sarita walked to my house and the two of us walked to Mark’s house. As we were walking down one of the city’s major thoroughfares, I was singing songs. Sarita asked if I knew “Pieces Of April.” I did (of course; I knew all the hits!), so I sang it for her.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

“In My Life” by The Beatles reminds me of Lynda.

Lynda was the second girl I dated, and I sang “In My Life” to her in high school on Valentine’s Day 1972. In December 1973 I asked her to marry me. Her dad, a Southern Baptist preacher, said no. Smart man………

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Need a unique gift for a Christmas or other special occasion?

Use code YLNNRX for a $40 discount on
Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos at Fine Art America

Photographic Art logo

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

I'm Zoey the Cool Cat, and I approve this post

Nipple play

Picture of the Moment

I came to San Diego in April 1993 specifically to “come out” and try to reconcile my conflict as a special person with my Mormon (mom) and Catholic (dad) upbringing.

My first 11 months in San Diego were spent enjoying all the beaches in San Diego County, getting a nice tan (which I currently am paying for), meeting other sun bunnies, and studying the world’s great, and not-so-great, religions.

After 11 months, I decided that I really didn’t need religion, didn’t need to reconcile who I am with any manmade religion, only with Mother and Father Nature. I’ll just leave it at that.

The preface is for the following bas relief which I found above the main entrance doors of a monastery here in San Diego:

Bas relief at a San Diego monastery

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

The religion to which that monastery belongs was founded in the late 12th century.

Look closely at that bas relief.

We could presume that the lower figure is Christ on the cross.

Let’s presume the figure behind Christ is God.

Notice the placement of God’s left hand?

On Christ’s nipple!

I’m not presuming to know anything about this religion, but what’s with that?

Look at the expressions on the faces.

Here’s my dialogue:

Christ: First tortured, now sexually assaulted.

God: Finally, I get to play with myself.

Upper left child: Ew. Incest. Necrophilia….

Upper right child: Will God do that to us when we grow up?

Is this a foretelling of what would happen in the Catholic Church many centuries later?

Were those activities prevalent all along?

….

And, for the record in response to Monday’s post, thanks for all the tips and tricks. None of them work anymore so I’m stuck with the new WordPress editor. And, to be blunt, it really really bites………

P.S. I expect to lose a few followers who will be upset and offended. That’s okay. Still hope they have a wonderful life.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray PhotosNeed a unique gift for Christmas?

Use code YLNNRX for a $40 discount on
Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos at Fine Art America

Photographic Art logo

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

I'm Zoey the Cool Cat, and I approve this post

San Diego Historical Landmarks—#16: Whaling Station Site

San Diego Historical Landmarks

My plans to explore San Diego’s historical landmarks in numerical order came crashing down this morning when I realized that I could not get to San Diego Historical Landmark #16, Whaling Station Site, because it is smack dab in the heart of Naval Station Point Loma.

Whaling station site location

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

In other words, it is inaccessible to the general public. What! How can a historical site be inaccessible? Oh, the nerve….

The site is next to the San Diego Submarine Base, and if you take a boat tour of San Diego harbor you can sometimes get great pictures of submarines.

Submarine and tugboat

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

There’s a road, 209 on the map but Rosecrans on all the street signs, that goes through the middle of the naval base and Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery.

Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery is directly above the submarine base, so if you stop and walk to the edges of the cemetery, you can get good pictures of the submarine base and submarines currently in port.

San Diego submarine base

San Diego submarine base

Submarine base

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Continue on Rosecrans out to Cabrillo National Monument and enjoy the best views of Shelter Island, Harbor Island, North Island Naval Air Station, and downtown San Diego.

North Island Naval Air Station and downtown San Diego from Cabrillo National Monument in Point Loma

Shelter Island and submarine base

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

The Whaling Station Site is where shore whaling had its start in San Diego in the 1850s. Shore whaling involved shore sites where whalers cut up the whales they had taken in the harbor and at sea. The blubber was boiled down for oil, which was coopered and stored for shipment at the site. The San Diego whaling station produced as much as 55,000 gallons of whale oil annually.

Shortly after the United States Government took Ballast Point in 1869 for military, quarantine, and lighthouse purposes, the whaling station was forced to move.

I did find out that the Whaling Station Site is accessible one day each year, on October 14, when is when Cabrillo National Monument was founded.

I guess you know where I’m going on October 14, 2016….

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

For the introductory blog post to San Diego’s historical landmarks, click on San Diego’s Historical Landmarks.

For previous posts in the San Diego Historical Landmarks series, go here.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Need a unique gift for Christmas or a special occasion?

Use code YLNNRX for a $40 discount on
Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos at Fine Art America

Photographic Art logo

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

I'm Zoey the Cool Cat, and I approve this post

San Diego Historical Landmarks: #15—Chapel of the Immaculate Conception

San Diego Historical Landmarks

There are so many historic buildings in Old Town San Diego State Historic Park that I thought we might never leave the Park!

Now that we’re finished there, we can start exploring historic buildings elsewhere, and we’ll start by walking two blocks south of Old Town, to 3965 Conde Street, to visit the Chapel of the Immaculate Conception.

Looks like this:

Old Adobe Chapel

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray PhotosNot to be confused with the Church of the Immaculate Conception, which looks like this:

Chapel of the Immaculate Conception

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

I mention the Church because it is quite a magnificent structure as opposed to the Chapel, and the Church stands at the entrance to Old Town State Historic Park. Thus, if you’re leaving Old Town to walk to the Chapel, and you see the Church of the Immaculate Conception, you will want to think that it is the Chapel of the Immaculate Conception. It’s not. Church……. Chapel……. Different.

The Chapel of the Immaculate Conception, also known as the Old Adobe Church, was built in 1850 according to most sources. One source, though, says that resident pastor Father John C. Holbein laid the cornerstone for the Old Adobe Church in 1851. Cornerstones were laid quite early in the construction of buildings, so I’m tempted to go with 1851 as the earliest the building could have been built. However, typographical and clerical errors do occur, so maybe I’ll just go with “ca. 1850.”

Other problems arise when researching this historical landmark. There is not much information online; the most information I found Old Adobe Chapel in San Diego, Californiais on markers outside the entrance. The largest marker (►) says that the Old Adobe Chapel originally was built in 1850 as the home of John Brown. It wasn’t until 1858 that Don José Antonio Aguirre, a wealthy and devoutly religious merchant, converted it to a church, which makes one question why Father John Holbein would be laying the cornerstone in 1850 for a simple house. Nonetheless….

Don Aguirre bought the land and what was then a 2-story adobe house in February 1858 for a whopping $350. The second story was removed, leaving just a small section for a choir loft; the wooden floor was kept; and religious furnishings were brought from the old San Diego Mission and installed.

Before the church could be consecrated, vandals damaged the altar. Several months afterwards, candlesticks, wax images, and the crucifix were damaged by a drunk who was found passed out on the altar.

The Old Adobe Church was consecrated on November 22, 1858, and dedicated to the Immaculate Conception of the Most Blessed Virgin by Padre Juan Molinier, resident priest at the time. Padre Molinier entered into church records that he had blessed the new church before a large number of people of different religions, and that it had been given by the most Christian Don José Antonio Aguirre for the greater glory of God and for the good of the faithful of San Diego. Continuing, Padre Molinier wrote that after Don Antonio’s death, his body would rest within the church.

According to sources, the dedication was followed by supper in La Casa de Aguirre, at which time both sentiment and wine flowed freely…. I’ll just leave it there….

Ramona, by Helen Hunt JacksonFather Antonio D. Ubach was the parish priest at the Old Adobe Chapel from 1866 to 1907. It is said (by whom, I don’t know) that he was the model for Father Gaspara in the novel “Ramona” by Helen Hunt Jackson.

The Old Adobe Chapel was rebuilt by the United States Works Progress Administration in 1937 during the Great Depression. Thus, it is not an original structure from 1850. Not only that, but it wasn’t even rebuilt at its original site! Ah, well.

Directly across Conde Street from the Old Adobe Chapel are several outdoor display windows about Old Town. One of the windows has additional information about the Old Adobe Chapel which I included in this post.

There also is a small model of the Chapel:

Old Adobe Chapel in San Diego, CaliforniaPictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

3965 Conde Street, location of Old Adobe Chapel in San Diego, California

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

For the introductory blog post to San Diego’s historical landmarks, click on San Diego’s Historical Landmarks.

For previous posts in the San Diego Historical Landmarks series, go here.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Need a unique gift? Anniversary? Birthday? Graduation? Marriage? Choose Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos at Fine Art America.

Photographic Art logo

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

I'm Zoey the Cool Cat, and I approve this post

Music on Mondays (10-26-15)—On this day in 1881

The Music Chronicles of Russel Ray

On this date in 1881, Wyatt Earp, Morgan Earp, and Virgil Earp took on the Clanton-McLaury gang at the famous Gunfight at the O.K. Corral in Tombstone, Arizona Territory, immortalized in many movies, arguably the best of which are Frontier Marshal (1939), Gunfight at the OK Corral (1957), Tombstone (1993), and Wyatt Earp (1994).

Frankie Lane sang the title song for the 1957 movie:

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Tombstone had become one of the richest mining towns in the Southwest after silver was discovered nearby in 1877.

Despite its name, the gunfight did not take place in or near the O.K. Corral but in a narrow lot on the side of C. S. Fly’s Photographic Studio, six doors west of the O.K. Corral’s rear entrance.

It was the result of a long-simmering feud between Billy Claiborne, Ike and Billy Clanton, Tom and Frank McLaury, and town Marshal Virgil Earp, Assistant Town Marshal Morgan Earp, and temporary deputy marshals Wyatt Earp and Doc Holliday. Billy Clanton and both McLaury brothers were killed. Ike Clanton claimed he was unarmed and ran from the fight, along with Billy Claiborne. Virgil, Morgan, and Doc Holliday were wounded, but Wyatt Earp was unharmed.

The Earps represented law and order in Tombstone but they also had reputations as being power-hungry and ruthless. The Clantons and McLaurys were cowboys who lived on a ranch outside of town and worked on the side as cattle rustlers, thieves, and murderers.

The gunfight lasted all of 30 seconds and is regarded by some as the most famous shootout in the history of the wild, wild west. It’s still debated who fired the first shot but most reports say that the shootout began when Virgil Earp shot Billy Clanton point-blank in the chest while Doc Holliday fired a shotgun blast at Tom McLaury.

The gunfight was not the end of the conflict. On December 28, 1881, Virgil Earp was ambushed and maimed in a murder attempt by the outlaw cowboys. On March 18, 1882, cowboys fired from a dark alley through the glass door of a saloon and shot Morgan Earp, killing him. The suspects in both incidents had alibis supplied by fellow cowboys, resulting in no indictments.

Gunfight at the O.K. Corrall has come to represent a period in American Old West when the frontier was pretty much an open range for outlaws, largely unopposed by law enforcement spread thin over vast territories.

The gunfight did not get widespread coverage until 1931, two years after Wyatt Earp died, when author Stuart Lake published a biography about him, Wyatt Earp: Frontier Marshal. The book captured the American imagination during the Great Depression and was the basis for the 1946 film, “My Darling Clementine,” by director John Ford. The shootout became known as the “Gunfight at the O.K. Corral” in 1957 with the release of the movie that year by that name.

I remember watching “The Life & Legend of Wyatt Earp” on television in the ’60s. The series originally ran from 1955 to 1961. Here’s the theme song:

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Need a unique gift for a special occasion?

Use code YLNNRX for a $40 discount on
Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos at Fine Art America

Photographic Art logo

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

I'm Zoey the Cool Cat, and I approve this post