Category Archives: Halls of History

San Diego Historical Landmarks—#5: Calvary Cemetery Site (follow-up)

San Diego Historical Landmarks

For the initial post on the Calvary Cemetery Site.

After I finished yesterday’s post about the Calvary Cemetery Site, I drove first to Calvary Memorial Pioneer Park looking for the gravestone of Father Antonio Ubach. He was the overseer of Calvary Cemetery in 1876 when it was created.

I had found a picture of the gravestone, taken in 1970, and it was a pretty big gravestone, possibly the biggest in the cemetery.

I figured if it was in good condition in 1970, it was probably somewhere around.

I just had to find it, and I did:

Calvary Memorial Pioneer Park

As soon as I saw it, I realized that I already had a picture, but I was facing into the morning sun and the top of the picture was blown out. So I cropped it and saved just the bottom part of the gravestone which I showed in yesterday’s post:

Calvary Memorial Pioneer Park

I started wondering about Father Antonio Ubach, so I went looking for information about him. I found it also, more from Google than from the indexes in my San Diego history books. He’s connected to a lot of San Diego history and historical landmarks, so we’ll be hearing more about Father Ubach in future posts.

From Calvary Memorial Pioneer Park, I drove to Mount Hope Cemetery, hoping to find the site where several hundred gravestones were dumped in 1970 when Calvary Cemetery was declared abandoned and turned into Calvary Memorial Pioneer Park.

Mount Hope Cemetery location

Mount Hope Cemetery opens at 8:00, so I had an hour to drive around the area. Along with Mount Hope Cemetery, there is Holy Cross Cemetery, Greenwood Cemetery, and Hope of Peace Cemetery. I guess this is the central cemetery district for San Diego. Back in the late nineteenth century when these cemeteries were created, this area was a pretty good distance from downtown San Diego. Now they are simply in an “older” neighborhood.

I drove around the outskirts of Mount Hope Cemetery, looking for that “isolated area” where the gravestones were dumped. Research led me to believe that there were a group of gravestones marking the site, but I found no grouping in any isolated areas.

When the cemetery opened, I stopped in the Raymond Chandler Business Office and met Paulette Crawford, one of the most helpful people I think I’ve ever met. I told her what I was trying to find and she knew exactly what I was looking for, called a staff member for verification, marked it on a cemetery map, and I was on my way. I was excited.

The location in an area that was not visible from a car, so I parked and went walking in the general direction where the site was supposed to be. I came upon this:

Mount Hope Cemetery in San Diego

There in the center of the picture—the gravestone group that I was looking for. The only problem was that they are down there and I’m way up here on a cliff. I didn’t see a way down, so I kept walking along the cliff to get closer to them, thinking that there had to be a way down there.

Meanwhile, the San Diego Trolley came by a couple of times, and you know how I am about trains.

Mount Hope Cemetery in San Diego

Paulette had told me that the gravestones were visible from the San Diego Trolley, which creeps through the area at about ten miles per hour, maybe less. I don’t know why…. out of respect for the dead or because it’s a long curve through a densely populated area.

Still looking for a way down….

Eventually the cliff ended, and around the edge of the cliff was a gentle slope down to the Trolley tracks. I was pretty sure it would lead me to where I wanted to go, and it did.

Mount Hope Cemetery in San Diego

Remember, the gravestones that had been dumped there, up to 400 of them, were visible from the Trolley, and the Trolley goes through there very slowly. I can see the look of horror on Trolley rider faces as they realized that many of the gravestones had markings on them, meaning that they probably belonged to graves somewhere. “Have they no respect for the dead?”

The gravestones remained visible from 1970 to 1988, at which time they were buried and the gravestone grouping was created. As I read on several of the online sites I visited, no one bothered to get the names and other identifying information from the gravestones before they were buried. Sad, but posts like mine might keep them alive (pun intended) so that several hundred years from now, maybe alien archaeologists might stumble upon them.

Mount Hope Cemetery in San Diego

Mount Hope Cemetery in San Diego

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

For the introductory blog post
to San Diego’s historical landmarks,
click on San Diego’s Historical Landmarks.

For previous posts in the
San Diego Historical Landmarks series,
go here.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

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San Diego Historical Landmarks—#5: Calvary Cemetery Site

San Diego Historical Landmarks

San Diego Historical Landmark #5 is site of the old Calvary Cemetery, now Calvary Memorial Pioneer Park. It was declared a historic site on February 29, 1969, by the The City of San Diego Historical Site Board. Interestingly, I could not find a calendar showing 1969 being a leap year so I don’t know what’s going on there.

Mission Hills Pioneer Park

Mission Hills Pioneer Park

Mission Hills Pioneer Park

I have passed by Pioneer Park without knowing its name or history at least a few thousand times since moving to San Diego in April 1993. Across the street are the Mission Hills tennis courts where I played many a game of tennis in 1993-94. A block down the street used to be one of San Diego’s largest real estate offices, where I spent a great deal of time when I started my home inspection business in October 2001.

As one is driving by, though, one sees the playground and the tall trees. That’s it. For someone like me who really doesn’t like children, I never had an interest in checking out the park. Well, exploring San Diego’s Historical Landmarks, especially #5 here, has taught me a lesson: Let no park go unexplored.

San Diego doesn’t have a lot of cemeteries, probably because cremation is the preferred method of taking care of dead bodies. So when I came to Historical Landmark #5, I actually thought I already had pictures of it. When I went to prepare the pictures for this post, I realized that the pictures were of the El Campo Santo Cemetery, which is Historical Landmark #26.

I set out to find Calvary Cemetery, and one of my history books told me that it is located in Mission Hills, Randolph Street at Washington Place. I realized that I knew exactly where it was:

Pioneer Park location

Mission Hills comprises many historical landmark homes, so we’ll be visiting the area a lot throughout my San Diego Historical Landmark series. The area is up on a mesa overlooking the ocean, Mission Valley, the airport, Old Town, and downtown San Diego. It is where California was founded in 1769; see the previous four posts in this series.

I parked at the far end of the park and was getting really discouraged as I walked around the park because there was no sign of tombstones anywhere. The park is hilly, though, and as I crested one of the final hills in the southeast corner, here is what greeted me:

img_8486 stamp

I can’t tell you how excited I was.

I walked around them from my hilly crest to get more pictures.

Mission Hills Pioneer Park

The land that currently is Calvary Memorial Pioneer Park was purchased by the City of San Diego in 1876 specifically to be used as a cemetery. Named Calvary Cemetery, one source says it was to be run by Catholic and Protestant churches. Other sources say that it was a Catholic cemetery run by Father Antonio Ubach.

One source says that it was “the new Catholic cemetery” to differentiate it from the older Catholic cemetery (now called “El Campo Santo Cemetery”; historical landmark #26) in Old Town. After burials began at Holy Cross Cemetery in 1919, Calvary Cemetery was referred to as “the old Catholic cemetery,” a name reflected in mortuary records and newspaper notices of the times.

Calvary Cemetery was used extensively from 1880 to 1919. The influenza pandemic of 1918-1919 (“Spanish Flu” or “La Grippe”) killed tens of millions of people worldwide, resulting in more people being buried at Calvary Cemetery in 1918 than in any other year.

The last burial was in 1960, but the cemetery had fallen into disrepair from 1919 to 1960, although the Works Progress Administration, a New Deal Agency of the Great Depression, renovated the cemetery in 1939 according to this Park monument:

Mission Hills Pioneer Park

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

A city resolution converted the cemetery into Calvary Memorial Pioneer Park in 1970. Of the more than 600 gravestones and monuments that remained in the cemetery, 142 were preserved in the park with the others being relocated to Mount Hope Cemetery.

Mount Hope Cemetery location

The intent was for Mount Hope Cemetery to be a temporary holding area until the gravestones could be returned to the new park. My history books say that “opposition prevented this,” but I don’t know who the opposition was.

A different online source (Calvary Cemetery, San Diego, CA) reports that “the removed and discarded gravestones were buried on the grounds of San Diego’s Mount Hope Cemetery. This action destroyed these historic monuments and the only existing record of hundreds of people who were born and died before birth and death certificates became standard.”

I do not think there are 142 gravestones remaining in the Park. I think 142 was the total number of gravestones that were saved, of which some are now in the Park, some at Mount Hope Cemetery, and apparently some even at other cemeteries throughout the area, according to the Calvary Cemetery, San Diego, CA source.

There is a large memorial in the southeast corner of the Park with about 2,000 names listed on its six plaques:

Mission Hills Pioneer Park

Mission Hills Pioneer Park

The Calvary Cemetery, San Diego, CA source states that over 4,000 people are documented as having been buried at Calvary Cemetery, and it has some pretty cool cemetery plot maps on its site.

Sadly, there are no dates of birth or death on the Park memorial, or any other identifying information. I didn’t want to transcribe all the names on the memorial plaques, thinking that somewhere in the world would be a list of all those who had been interred in Calvary Cemetery. The previously mentioned online source and the “Guide to the Calvary Cemetery Collection” available online at the San Diego History Center are the two best resources I could find.

With the pictures in the Collection, as well as other identifying information, I can now visit Mount Hope Cemetery to see what might remain of any gravestones that were relocated there.

The oldest date on the remaining gravestones in the Park was for Julian Ames, born in 1807:

img_8493 stamp

Interestingly, records indicate that the first burial at Calvary Cemetery was in 1875, so I can’t explain Julian’s gravestone. Maybe he was reinterred from elsewhere.

I found it quite interesting to read through the details on the gravestones. There were babies, military from throughout the country, religious leaders, regular people….

Mission Hills Pioneer Park

Mission Hills Pioneer Park

Mission Hills Pioneer Park

Mission Hills Pioneer Park

Lastly, here we have proof of reincarnation:

Mission Hills Pioneer Park

The last person to be buried at Calvary Cemetery was Rose Wilson Mallicoat, buried on March 16, 1960. In addition to being the last, she died on my birthday in 1960; I was five years old.

As I was walking around the park, I had mixed feelings knowing that I was walking on gravesites. I still had mixed feelings as I was researching this post even though I discovered that on June 5, 1957, California Governor Goodwin Knight approved Assembly Bill No. 2751 that amended the state Health and Safety Code (Section 8825-8829) to establish the procedure for allowing a city or county to declare a cemetery abandoned and convert it to a pioneer memorial park. So there we have it: Calvary Memorial Pioneer Park.

According to Calvary Cemetery, San Diego, CA, on February 9, 1988, “A bulldozer was used to bury many gravestones that had been taken from Calvary Cemetery in 1970. They were buried in an isolated area on the property of The City of San Diego’s Mount Hope Cemetery. As a memorial, a small group of the headstones (that had been taken from Calvary Cemetery in 1970) were set in concrete near the site of the buried gravestones at Mount Hope Cemetery.”

With that said, I’m on my way this morning to Mount Hope Cemetery to see if I can find the site of the buried gravestones and the group that might still be standing. Check in tomorrow for the conclusion to this post!

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

For the introductory blog post
to San Diego’s historical landmarks,
click on San Diego’s Historical Landmarks.

For previous posts in the
San Diego Historical Landmarks series,
go here.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

Need a unique gift? Have Bare Wall Symdrome?
Visit Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos at Fine Art America.
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San Diego Historical Landmarks—#4: Site of the Presidio of San Diego, part 2

San Diego Historical Landmarks

San Diego Historical Landmark #4 is the site of the Presidio of San Diego. Read part one here.

On the grounds where the Presidio of San Diego was existed—nothing but bumps in the landscape now—stands the Junípero Serra Museum, one of the most familiar landmarks in San Diego.

Junipero Serra Museum in San Diego California

Junipero Serra Museum in San Diego California

Junipero Serra Museum in San Diego California

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

The museum was built in 1928-1929 to house the collection of the San Diego Historical Society (now named the San Diego History Center), which was founded in 1928.

The museum is open only on Saturdays and Sundays.

If you love history, wandering about the museum for a couple of hours is a great way to spend some time.

Although the museum is small, it has lots of great documents, pictures, and archaeological findings.

Junipero Serra Museum in San Diego

Junipero Serra Museum in San Diego

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

In a previous post, I mentioned the El Jupiter cannon which I knew was located in the museum:

El Jupiter cannon in the Junipero Serra Museum in San Diego

El Jupiter cannon in the Junipero Serra Museum in San Diego

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

View of Fashion Valley Mall and the University of San Diego from the Serra Museum tower:

View of Fashion Valley Mall and the University of San Diego from the Serra Museum tower .

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

For the introductory blog post
to San Diego’s historical landmarks,
click on San Diego’s Historical Landmarks.

For previous posts in the
San Diego Historical Landmarks series,
go here.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

Need a unique gift? Have Bare Wall Symdrome?
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History Through Philately—The Gateway Arch

History Through Philately stamp

On this date in 1965, the Gateway Arch in St. Louis, Missouri, was completed.

Scott #4044 Gateway ArchScott #4044, Gateway Arch
Issued May 27, 2006

The Gateway Arch is the tallest memorial in the United States, the tallest stainless steel monument in the world, Missouri’s tallest accessible building (you can go in it and up to the top), and the world’s tallest arch.

It is 630 feet wide at the base and 630 feet tall at its peak. My mathematics skills, admittedly lacking in today’s world of computer calculators, tells me that something 630 feet wide by 630 feet tall is a square. So why does this look like an arch?

Tidbits

  1. It was designed in 1947. Construction began on February 12, 1963; it was completed on October 28, 1965; and it opened to the public on June 10, 1967.
  2. The proposal to build a memorial on the St. Louis riverfront was first suggested in late 1933 during the Great Depression.
  3. Construction costs were estimated at $30 million, an unbelievable expenditure during the Great Depression, and an estimated 5,000 jobs were to be created for three to four years. Actual construction costs came in at $14 million, but only 100 jobs were created.
  4. On December 31, 1935, President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued Executive Order 7253 to declare the 82-acre site as the very first National Historic Site. The Order also provided $3.3 million through the Works Progress Administration and another $3.45 million through the Public Works Administration.
  5. The City of St. Louis acquired the 82 acres through public condemnation rather than purchase.
  6. A design competition for the memorial was suggested in November 1944, and such a competition opened on May 30, 1947. Submissions were first received on September 1, 1947, and the winner was announced on February 19, 1948.
  7. Not everyone supported construction of the arch. Many St. Louis residents considered it a “stupendous hairpin” and a “stainless steel hitching post.”
  8. During the height of the railroad building empire, railroads bought or were given prime property in many cities. Such was the case with St. Louis with railroad tracks passing between the location of the memorial and the riverfront. Ultimately, the tracks of the Missouri Pacific Railroad were relocated 105 feet west and lowered 18 feet below ground.
  9. Moving the railroad tracks was first suggested in early 1949. It took another ten years before an agreement was reached between the city and the railroad, and funds were made available.
  10. Construction bids were accepted through January 22, 1962. As seems to always be the case with, the lowest bidder won. Ground was broken in 1959, the foundation was completed in 1961, and construction on the actual arch began in 1963.
  11. The arch is resistant to earthquakes and is designed to sway up to nine inches in winds up to 150 mph.
  12. MacDonald Construction Company won the construction bid. Hmmm. MacDonald building a huge McDonald’s arch……………

Gateway Arch in St. Louis, Missouri

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

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San Diego Historical Landmarks—#4: Presidio of San Diego site, part 1

San Diego Historical Landmarks

San Diego Historical Landmark #4 is the site of the Presidio of San Diego.

Presidio of San Diego site

San Diego Presidio Site
Soldiers, sailors, Indians, and Franciscan missionaries from New Spain occupied the land at Presidio Hill on May 17, 1769 as a military outpost. Two months later, Fr. Junipero Serra established the first San Diego mission on Presidio Hill. Officially proclaimed a Spanish Presidio on January 1, 1774, the fortress was later occupied by a succession of Mexican forces. The Presidio was abandoned in 1837 after San Diego became a pueblo.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Only ruins of the Presidio remain, simple bumps in the ground:

Site of the Presidio of San Diego

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

A walk around the surround grounds finds many items of interest, such as a statue of “The Indian” by Arthur Putnam (1873-1930)….

The Indian, by Arthur Puinam, in San Diego California

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

….a statue of “The Padre,” also by Arthur Putnam….

"The Padre" by Arthur Putnam in San Diego California

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

….and a hugemonstergiganticreallyreallybig cross made out of bricks:

The Cross in Presidio Park in San Diego California

The Cross in Presidio Park in San Diego California

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Wouldn’t it be neat if we discovered that the bricks are from an old building in the area? Sadly, I could find nothing about the cross other than what is told on a plaque at the base:

In this ancient Indian village of Cosoy
Discovered and named San Miguel by Cabrillo in 1549
Visited and christened San Diego de Alcala by Vizcaino in 1602
Here the first citizen
Fray Junipero Serra
Planted civilization in California
Here he first raised the cross. Here began the first mission.
Here founded the first town, San Diego, July 16, 1769
In memory of him and his works. The Order of Panama 1913.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Just across the street from the ruins of the Presidio is the Junípero Serra Museum, one of the most familiar landmarks in San Diego.

Junipero Serra Museum in San Diego California

Junipero Serra Museum in San Diego California

Junipero Serra Museum in San Diego California

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

The Junípero Serra Museum is often mistaken for Mission Basilica San Diego de Alcalá—indeed, for many years, I counted myself among the mistaken.

The Serra Museum was built in 1928-1929 for the purpose of housing the collection of the San Diego Historical Society (now named the San Diego History Center), which was founded in 1928. William Templeton Johnson was the architect and used Spanish Revival architecture to resemble the early missions that once dominated the Southern California landscape.

Following are three pictures from the Museum’s collection of the Museum in 1929:

Architect’s elevation drawingElevation of the Junipero Serra Museum in San Diego California

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Project completedJunipero Serra Museum in San Diego California

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Dedication DayDedication day of the Junipero Serra Museum in San Diego California

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Prior to the Great Recession, the Museum was open seven days a week. Now, sadly, it is open only on weekends.

There are other markers from the past, and I’m sure I missed some because they are located in strange places, places which probably weren’t so strange many decades ago. An example is this tree, possibly as old as the ruins:

Presidio Hill in San Diego California

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

See the crooked gravestone-like marker at the right of the trunk? Obviously I had to go see what it said:

Presidio Hill in San Diego California

Dedicated in memory of
Father Francisco Palou
Biographer of Fr. Serra

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

I also discovered a huge statue of a man on a horse:

Presidio Hill in San Diego California

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

The plaque on the base is in Spanish:

DONADO A LA CIUDAD DE SAN DIEGO
POR EL SEÑOR LICENSIADO
GUSTAVO DIAZ ORDAZ
PRESIDENTE DE LA REPUBLICA MEXICANA
NOVIEMBRE DE 1970

Wikipedia tells me that Gustavo Diaz Ordaz (1911-1979) was president of Mexico from 1964 to 1970. That, however, doesn’t explain anything about this statue and why it is there. Research for another day….

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

As I said earlier, the Junípero Serra Museum is open only on Saturdays and Sundays. I went a couple of weeks ago, and in my next posting about San Diego Historical Landmarks, I’ll take you inside the Museum. It’s quite beautiful and should not be missed if you make a trip to Presidio Hill.

The San Diego Presidio Site is also California Registered Historic Landmark #59. Considering that this is where California was founded, what 58 sites could be more important?

Junipero Sera Museum in San Diego California

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

For the introductory blog post
to San Diego’s historical landmarks,
click on San Diego’s Historical Landmarks.

For previous posts in the
San Diego Historical Landmarks series,
go here.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

Need a unique gift? Have Bare Wall Symdrome?
Visit Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos at Fine Art America.
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2014 Woodie car show at Moonlight Beach in Encinicatas, California

Out & About

Each year in September, Moonlight State Beach in Encinitas, California, is host to one of the best car shows in San Diego County, featuring the Woodie:

Woody at the 2014 Woody car show in Encinitas, California

A Woodie has bodywork constructed of wood or simulated wood. The style first appeared in the early 1930s when the wood was actually a structural component of the car. Eventually it became simply an applied decoration to the side and doors. I think its heyday was with the 1950s and ’60s surfing generation.

Woody at the 2014 Woody car show in Encinitas, California

Woody at the 2014 Woody car show in Encinitas, California

Just about every car manufacturer of the ’50s and ’60s featured at least one Woodie in its car lineup, which makes seeing such lineups at Woodie car shows quite interesting.

Woody at the 2014 Woody car show in Encinitas, California

Woody at the 2014 Woody car show in Encinitas, California

Woody at the 2014 Woody car show in Encinitas, California

Woody at the 2014 Woody car show in Encinitas, California

I fell in love with all of them….

Well, except for this one:

1951 Ford Woodie

I’m the last person you would want to restore a car. By the time I finished, it would be something like what Johnny Cash described in “One Piece At A Time.”

Woody at the 2014 Woody car show in Encinitas, California

Moonlight State Beach

Go to location on Google Maps

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

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San Diego Historical Landmarks—#3: Fort Stockton

San Diego Historical Landmarks

San Diego Historical Landmark #3 is the site of Fort Stockton. From afar, all you see is a flag:

Site of Fort Stockton in San Diego, California, marked by a flag

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Fort Stockton was originally named Fort DuPont and is located on Presidio Hill. It has expansive views of Mission Valley, Old Town San Diego, the San Diego Harbor, and the Pacific Ocean, accounting for its strategic importance during the Mexican-American War of 1846-1848.

View from Presidio Hill

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

View from Presidio Hill

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

The square doohickey in the picture immediately above is the carriage for an old cannon. The cannon is on display in the Serra Museum a few hundred yards away. It was cast in 1783, bears the coat of arms of King Carlos III of Spain, the name “El Jupiter,” and a Latin phrase which translates as “Beware the King’s Thunderbolts.” I will endeavor to get a picture of the cannon this weekend.

Presidio Hill is where the first European settlement in Alta California was established in 1769. The Spanish occupied Presidio Hill until Mexico gained its independence in 1821. By the time war broke out between Mexico and the U.S. in 1846, Presidio Hill had been abandoned.

At the beginning of the Mexican-American War, in July of 1846, U.S. forces numbering 160 from the USS Cayne took San Diego and re-established a military outpost on Presidio Hill, naming it Fort DuPont after the Cayne’s captain, Samuel F. DuPont.

Ten days after capturing San Diego, DuPont and the majority of his men sailed the Cayne north to successfully take Los Angeles, leaving behind just forty men in San Diego. A Mexican offensive which began in Los Angeles in September 1846 made its way south to San Diego. By October, San Diego once again belonged to the Mexicans. Three weeks later, though, the Americans recaptured San Diego for the second time.

Old Fort Stockton in San DiegoIn November 1846, Commodore Robert Stockton, commander of the American Pacific Squadron, sailed the USS Congress into San Diego Bay. His troops took over Fort DuPont, renamed it Fort Stockton, and strengthened its defenses. Fort Stockton changed hands several times between American troops and Mexican troops during the war. When the war ended in 1848, Fort Stockton was abandoned.

Plaques, monuments, and the flag mark the spot where Fort Stockton once stood. All evidence of its existence, however, has faded into history.

Several of the plaques and monuments remind us that the famed Mormon Battalion arrived at Fort Stockton in on January 29, 1847. Originally consisting of 500 men and about 80 women and children, they had left Council Bluffs, Iowa on July 16, 1846, a grueling 2,000-mile march to San Diego. They had come as their patriotic duty to help in the war effort. But the war in California was over by the time of their arrival. Nonetheless, their patriotism and march are unparalleled in the annals of history.

Mormon Battalion plaque at Fort Stockton in San Diego

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Mormon Battalion plaque at Fort Stockton in San Diego

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Mormon Battalion plaque at Fort Stockton in San Diego

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Monument to the Mormon Battalion at Fort Stockton in San Diego

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Monument to the Mormon Battalion at Fort Stockton in San Diego

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Monument to the Mormon Battalion at Fort Stockton in San Diego

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Mormon Battalion plaque at Fort Stockton in San Diego

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Mormon Battalion plaque at Fort Stockton in San Diego

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Fort Stockton is San Diego Historical Landmark #3 and California Registered Historic Landmark #54.

Fort Stockton in San Diego

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

Old Glory at Fort Stockton historical site in San Diego

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

For the introductory blog post
to San Diego’s historical landmarks,
click on San Diego’s Historical Landmarks.

For previous posts in the
San Diego Historical Landmarks series,
go here.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

This post approved by
This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

Need a unique gift? Have Bare Wall Symdrome?
Visit Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos at Fine Art America.
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