Author Archives: Russel Ray Photos

About Russel Ray Photos

Forty-five years as a photographer, beginning with yearbook staff in sixth grade.

San Diego Historical Landmarks—#5: Calvary Cemetery Site

San Diego Historical Landmarks

San Diego Historical Landmark #5 is site of the old Calvary Cemetery, now Calvary Memorial Pioneer Park. It was declared a historic site on February 29, 1969, by the The City of San Diego Historical Site Board. Interestingly, I could not find a calendar showing 1969 being a leap year so I don’t know what’s going on there.

Mission Hills Pioneer Park

Mission Hills Pioneer Park

Mission Hills Pioneer Park

I have passed by Pioneer Park without knowing its name or history at least a few thousand times since moving to San Diego in April 1993. Across the street are the Mission Hills tennis courts where I played many a game of tennis in 1993-94. A block down the street used to be one of San Diego’s largest real estate offices, where I spent a great deal of time when I started my home inspection business in October 2001.

As one is driving by, though, one sees the playground and the tall trees. That’s it. For someone like me who really doesn’t like children, I never had an interest in checking out the park. Well, exploring San Diego’s Historical Landmarks, especially #5 here, has taught me a lesson: Let no park go unexplored.

San Diego doesn’t have a lot of cemeteries, probably because cremation is the preferred method of taking care of dead bodies. So when I came to Historical Landmark #5, I actually thought I already had pictures of it. When I went to prepare the pictures for this post, I realized that the pictures were of the El Campo Santo Cemetery, which is Historical Landmark #26.

I set out to find Calvary Cemetery, and one of my history books told me that it is located in Mission Hills, Randolph Street at Washington Place. I realized that I knew exactly where it was:

Pioneer Park location

Mission Hills comprises many historical landmark homes, so we’ll be visiting the area a lot throughout my San Diego Historical Landmark series. The area is up on a mesa overlooking the ocean, Mission Valley, the airport, Old Town, and downtown San Diego. It is where California was founded in 1769; see the previous four posts in this series.

I parked at the far end of the park and was getting really discouraged as I walked around the park because there was no sign of tombstones anywhere. The park is hilly, though, and as I crested one of the final hills in the southeast corner, here is what greeted me:

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I can’t tell you how excited I was.

I walked around them from my hilly crest to get more pictures.

Mission Hills Pioneer Park

The land that currently is Calvary Memorial Pioneer Park was purchased by the City of San Diego in 1876 specifically to be used as a cemetery. Named Calvary Cemetery, one source says it was to be run by Catholic and Protestant churches. Other sources say that it was a Catholic cemetery run by Father Antonio Ubach.

One source says that it was “the new Catholic cemetery” to differentiate it from the older Catholic cemetery (now called “El Campo Santo Cemetery”; historical landmark #26) in Old Town. After burials began at Holy Cross Cemetery in 1919, Calvary Cemetery was referred to as “the old Catholic cemetery,” a name reflected in mortuary records and newspaper notices of the times.

Calvary Cemetery was used extensively from 1880 to 1919. The influenza pandemic of 1918-1919 (“Spanish Flu” or “La Grippe”) killed tens of millions of people worldwide, resulting in more people being buried at Calvary Cemetery in 1918 than in any other year.

The last burial was in 1960, but the cemetery had fallen into disrepair from 1919 to 1960, although the Works Progress Administration, a New Deal Agency of the Great Depression, renovated the cemetery in 1939 according to this Park monument:

Mission Hills Pioneer Park

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

A city resolution converted the cemetery into Calvary Memorial Pioneer Park in 1970. Of the more than 600 gravestones and monuments that remained in the cemetery, 142 were preserved in the park with the others being relocated to Mount Hope Cemetery.

Mount Hope Cemetery location

The intent was for Mount Hope Cemetery to be a temporary holding area until the gravestones could be returned to the new park. My history books say that “opposition prevented this,” but I don’t know who the opposition was.

A different online source (Calvary Cemetery, San Diego, CA) reports that “the removed and discarded gravestones were buried on the grounds of San Diego’s Mount Hope Cemetery. This action destroyed these historic monuments and the only existing record of hundreds of people who were born and died before birth and death certificates became standard.”

I do not think there are 142 gravestones remaining in the Park. I think 142 was the total number of gravestones that were saved, of which some are now in the Park, some at Mount Hope Cemetery, and apparently some even at other cemeteries throughout the area, according to the Calvary Cemetery, San Diego, CA source.

There is a large memorial in the southeast corner of the Park with about 2,000 names listed on its six plaques:

Mission Hills Pioneer Park

Mission Hills Pioneer Park

The Calvary Cemetery, San Diego, CA source states that over 4,000 people are documented as having been buried at Calvary Cemetery, and it has some pretty cool cemetery plot maps on its site.

Sadly, there are no dates of birth or death on the Park memorial, or any other identifying information. I didn’t want to transcribe all the names on the memorial plaques, thinking that somewhere in the world would be a list of all those who had been interred in Calvary Cemetery. The previously mentioned online source and the “Guide to the Calvary Cemetery Collection” available online at the San Diego History Center are the two best resources I could find.

With the pictures in the Collection, as well as other identifying information, I can now visit Mount Hope Cemetery to see what might remain of any gravestones that were relocated there.

The oldest date on the remaining gravestones in the Park was for Julian Ames, born in 1807:

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Interestingly, records indicate that the first burial at Calvary Cemetery was in 1875, so I can’t explain Julian’s gravestone. Maybe he was reinterred from elsewhere.

I found it quite interesting to read through the details on the gravestones. There were babies, military from throughout the country, religious leaders, regular people….

Mission Hills Pioneer Park

Mission Hills Pioneer Park

Mission Hills Pioneer Park

Mission Hills Pioneer Park

Lastly, here we have proof of reincarnation:

Mission Hills Pioneer Park

The last person to be buried at Calvary Cemetery was Rose Wilson Mallicoat, buried on March 16, 1960. In addition to being the last, she died on my birthday in 1960; I was five years old.

As I was walking around the park, I had mixed feelings knowing that I was walking on gravesites. I still had mixed feelings as I was researching this post even though I discovered that on June 5, 1957, California Governor Goodwin Knight approved Assembly Bill No. 2751 that amended the state Health and Safety Code (Section 8825-8829) to establish the procedure for allowing a city or county to declare a cemetery abandoned and convert it to a pioneer memorial park. So there we have it: Calvary Memorial Pioneer Park.

According to Calvary Cemetery, San Diego, CA, on February 9, 1988, “A bulldozer was used to bury many gravestones that had been taken from Calvary Cemetery in 1970. They were buried in an isolated area on the property of The City of San Diego’s Mount Hope Cemetery. As a memorial, a small group of the headstones (that had been taken from Calvary Cemetery in 1970) were set in concrete near the site of the buried gravestones at Mount Hope Cemetery.”

With that said, I’m on my way this morning to Mount Hope Cemetery to see if I can find the site of the buried gravestones and the group that might still be standing. Check in tomorrow for the conclusion to this post!

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

For the introductory blog post
to San Diego’s historical landmarks,
click on San Diego’s Historical Landmarks.

For previous posts in the
San Diego Historical Landmarks series,
go here.

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

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Music on Mondays (11-24-14)—Me & You & A Dog Named….

The Music Chronicles of Russel Ray

Some of my favorite songs about dogs:

“Me & You & A Dog Named Boo” by Lobo

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

“I Love My Dog” by Cat Stevens

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

“Walking The Dog” by Aerosmith

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

“Martha My Dear” by The Beatles

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

“I Wanna Be Your Dog” by The Stooges

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

“My Dog & Me” by John Hiatt

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

“Old Blue” by The Byrds

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

“Shannon” by Henry Gross

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

“Old Shep” by Elvis Presley

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

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Adobe Falls now off limits

Out & About

San Diego doesn’t have many natural waterfalls. I think it has something to do with needing water to fall from the skies in order for water to flow along the ground and create waterfalls. Just a hunch.

The waterfalls that we do have, however, are pretty nice. The problem is how to get to them safely.

Inevitably when the rains come (another four weeks or so) and the waterfalls start falling, people who have no appreciation for the outdoors tend to make their way to the waterfalls, destroying everything in their path and sometimes destroying the waterfalls, too.

One of the rare year-round waterfalls here in the County is just a mile from me and at the side of Interstate 8, but it is extremely difficult to get to because it’s in a small canyon surrounded by highway and houses.

The reason why it is year-round is because it’s in a small canyon occupied by the San Diego River. It’s called Adobe Falls.

Adobe Falls location

It also happens to be on land owned by San Diego State University.

Because of the damage and destruction to houses and environment caused by those trying to get to the waterfalls, SDSU has decided to make the waterfalls off limits to the extent that anyone caught on that little sliver of land will be arrested.

The grapevine tells me that they mean it and have been backing up their words. Thus, I will not be going to the waterfalls this year, so you’ll simply have to enjoy these pictures from past trips.

Adobe Falls

Adobe Falls

There’s a huge building on the SDSU campus with a magnificent view of the little canyon where Adobe Falls is located, although the Falls is hidden from view in the midst of all the palm trees and brush:

SDSU building overlooking Adobe Falls

Adobe Falls

Even though there is a 12-lane freeway between Adobe Falls and that building, wouldn’t that be a great place for SDSU to station lookouts to keep an eye on trespassers to the Falls?

On my last trip to Adobe Falls, I found this little guy:

Green heron at Adobe Falls

I’m pretty sure that is a Green Heron, and it was not in the least bit frightened of me. It let me get within a few feet to get that picture! Just kept one eye on me, seeming to say, “Yeah, I’ve seen your kind around here before. I’m keeping an eye on you.”

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos

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IBOexchange update

Did you know?

If you missed my first post (and all the great comments) about IBOexchange, go here: IBOexchange.

After 17 days of using IBOexchange, I wanted to provide an update. I am having fun with it, but fun doesn’t always make money. However, in this case, income flow has started.

First, most of the IBOexchange members are in “network marketing,” “online marketing,” and “MLM” (multi-level marketing). That’s okay, though, because I’m not interested in changing careers, only in making contacts. If the network/online/MLM folks are so rich, then they should be able to buy Photographic Art at some point. All I have to do is keep making contacts because the more contacts you make, the greater the possibility of someone buying your product or service.

Two of my sites are registered with IBOexchange: my blog here and my Facebook business page. I have my WordPress blog registered because I have WordAds here, and every visitor here makes an “ad impression” for which I get paid.

Thanksgiving squirrelI have been blogging since June 2008, and I have been able to determine that blogging/liking/commenting truly does adhere to the 80/20 rule in that if I like/comment on a blog, 80 percent of those people will be by within 30 days to like/comment on my blog. Not only that, but 80 percent of those people will leave an equal number of likes and comments. If I leave 10 likes/comments, 80 percent will be by my blog within 30 days and leave 10 likes/comments.

Continuation can often result in relationships.

I’m currently following 3,033 blogs, so if I could like/comment them all today, within 30 days I’d have 2,426 likes/comments. Now picture me camping out in just 10 blogs per day for 30 days and leaving 10 likes/comments per day. Within 30 days after I finish, I’ll have 2,400 likes/comments….

….which turn into ad impressions, which makes me money!

Have I noticed an uptick in daily visits? Yes, I have, to the tune of an extra 100 hits per day, and that’s with me doing very little this past week because I’ve been sick.

Now let’s look at my Facebook business page. Facebook has this notification system whereby you can invite all of your friends to like your business page. It worked extremely well until I reached 500 likes. Once I reached that level, though, it was extremely difficult to get new likes. Of course, I got daily messages from Facebook offering to promote my page to get more likes for just $25 per day. No….

Thanksgiving squirrelFacebook likes in and of themselves won’t pay the bills. Contacts will, and Facebook knows that, but what small business has $25 per day to pay them to promote the business without any guarantee whatsoever. No….

When I started IBOexchange on November 5, my Facebook business page had 558 likes. As of a few minutes ago, 17 days later, it has 777 likes. That’s an average of almost 13 likes per day. That’s significant, even better than what Facebook was providing initially.

More importantly, though, Facebook provides me with a list of the people who have liked my business page. That’s key, because those are prospective customers. Now all I have to do is continue to reach out to them. It’s marketing at its most basic level.

Thanksgiving squirrelI also try to let everyone know that I made it to their Facebook page/web site/YouTube/whatever by leaving a simple comment: “Found my way here via IBOexchange.” That does two things: It lets them know that I’m serious about relationships, and it tells them that IBOexchange works if they don’t already know that.”

I also have a Photographic Art blog, a blog that hasn’t been very active. Beginning this weekend, I will endeavor to correct that deficiency and make it my Photographic Art blog, as it should be.

A good general rule of thumb might be the 80/20 rule: 80% of my posts here will be photos, music, philately, Zoey the Cool Cat, my wise old grandmother, etc., while 20% will be about my Photographic Art venture.

Thanks for stopping by! See you next time!Over at my Photographic Art blog, 80% of my posts will be about my Photographic Art venture, and 20% will be about everything else in life.

So if you want the best of both, be sure to follow both. Here’s my Photographic Art blog: Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos. That is where I will be posting specials, new Photographic Art, and happiness when someone buys something. I probably will also move my “How I Did It” series from here over to there.

If you think you might be interested in IBOexchange for your business, click on the image below:

IBOexchange

Pictures copyright 2012 Russel Ray Photos This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

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Friday Flower Fiesta (11-21-14)—San Diego late Fall flowers

Friday Flower Fiesta

I started getting sick last Monday and it hit home hard yesterday and today.

I have a horribly sore throat, no voice, and no energy.

Nonetheless, onward with Friday Flower Fiesta featuring some of our late Fall flowers here in San Diego, which also happen to be winter, spring, and summer flowers.

Never without flowers here in San Diego….

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Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos

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Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos

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Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos

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Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos

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Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos

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Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos

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Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos

Well, I thought I could do twelve flowers as I usually do but the energy is gone so you’ll have to settle for seven this week.

Photographic Art by Russel Ray Photos

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Condominium tower for wildlife

Picture of the Moment

A condominium tower for wildlife.

The seagulls have the view but the seals are closer to the swimming pool.

Buoy with seagulls and seals

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I have the answer:photograhic art taking pictures making art

Visit Russel Ray Photos at Fine Art America.

Christmas is just around the corner, so order today!

This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat

Moving the mouse in a straight line in Photoshop

How I Did It

It’s no secret that ever since the advent of the computer mouse, those of us working with drawing programs such as Corel Draw and Adobe Illustrator wanted a way to draw a straight line. It didn’t take too long before Corel and Adobe gave us the ability to draw those straight lines.

Recently I was wanting to draw a perfectly straight line in Photoshop, and that’s when it occurred to me that since Photoshop also is an Adobe product, there just might be a way to draw a straight line.

A simple Google search told me how:

Select the Pen tool.
Position the Pen tool where you want the straight segment to begin, and click to define the first anchor point (do not drag).
Click again where you want the segment to end (Shift-click to constrain the angle of the segment to a multiple of 45°).

I’m pretty much a keyboard person, using the mouse only when the keyboard is awkward, like drawing lines.

While I was drawing lines, I inadvertently hit the shortcut key to get to the eraser. In my haste and not realizing that I had switched to the eraser, I clicked where I wanted the line to begin, Shift-clicked where I wanted the line to end, and voilà!, I erased in a perfectly straight line!

My mind started working.

Some experimentation indicated that I could do anything in a perfectly straight line simply by clicking where I wanted to start and Shift-clicking where I wanted to end….

pen tool – yep
eraser tool – yep
clone tool – yep
spot healing tool – yep
brush tool – yep

Doesn’t seem to matter what you need to do, if you need to do it in a straight line, try Click, Shift-click.

Lastly, does anyone have a recommendation for software that will record my screen while I do things? That would have been very convenient for this post.

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Do you have BWS?
I have the answer:photograhic art taking pictures making art

Visit Russel Ray Photos at Fine Art America.

Christmas is just around the corner, so order today!

This post approved by Zoey the Cool Cat